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Publication date: 7 May 2019

Holly Chiu, Dov Fischer and Hershey Friedman

Board diversity has been an important topic in corporate governance. Extant literature examines the overall diversity in the boardroom and its impact. However, since…

Abstract

Purpose

Board diversity has been an important topic in corporate governance. Extant literature examines the overall diversity in the boardroom and its impact. However, since important decisions are usually taken by the committees, it is important to also examine diversity in committees. We use the Coca-Cola Company as the case study and examine its diversity in both audit and finance committees. Our goal is to raise the awareness of researchers, board nominating committees, and diverse directors themselves, as to whether diverse directors are placed in the right positions to allow them to contribute their diverse views and experiences.

Methodology/Approach

We conducted a case study of the Coca-Cola Company using its proxy statement in both 2016 and 2018.

Findings

While Coca-Cola’s self-reported board diversity stood at 27% in 2016, and increased to 31% by 2018, the critical audit and finance committees showed a distinct lack of diversity. Focusing on gender diversity for the purposes of this chapter, we investigated two possibilities: (1) that the lack of committee diversity is due to the lack of finance and leadership skills of those board members who were from underrepresented groups, but this possibility does not seem likely, (2) that the presence of a female CFO removed the urgency to place board members from underrepresented groups on the audit and finance committees.

Value

We provide a cautionary perspective on the implementation of diversity policies at the highest levels of an organization. The pursuit of diversity, like other admirable corporate goals, can degenerate into a check-the-box mentality. When this happens, diversity can become viewed as a substitute for real competency rather than a complement to existing competencies.

Practical Implications

It is suggested that boards revise the recruiting and selecting process to include more female candidates, and be sensitive how and where those diverse directors can best contribute their perspectives and experiences.

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Ross D. Petty

This paper aims to discuss the early brand protection efforts of Coca‐Cola.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the early brand protection efforts of Coca‐Cola.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the hundreds of trademark infringement challenges brought by Coca‐Cola in courts and before the US Patent and Trademark Office and develops a tripartite system of categorizing these challenges by primary legal issue.

Findings

Coca‐Cola developed several innovations in brand identity protection including challenges to a wide variety of similar names, logos and packaging, the use of detectives in service settings and the use of consumer psychological evidence in legal proceedings. Ultimately, it protected it name against those rivals that closely imitated both words in its name or words similar to Coca or Coke. However, it was unable to obtain exclusive rights to the word cola which became the generic designation for such drinks.

Practical implications

Even today, the scope of Coca‐Cola's brand protection efforts provide a useful model for modern brands. This work also presents and summarizes important historical data.

Originality/value

This study examines Coca‐Cola's brand protection efforts and legal challenges in much greater detail than previous historical works on Coca‐Cola.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Leo Paul Dana and Claudio Vignali

Coca‐Cola is relatively standardised around the world. However, expansion into Poland was exceptionally challenging. This case is about the entry of Coca‐Cola into the…

Abstract

Coca‐Cola is relatively standardised around the world. However, expansion into Poland was exceptionally challenging. This case is about the entry of Coca‐Cola into the Polish market. The reader realises that there are important differences within Poland to consider.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Sridevi Shivarajan, Thomas DuBois and Aravind Srinivasan

Can marginalized stakeholders whose issues with the firm are unaddressed because of their resource and legitimacy constraints (low salience) increase their salience by…

Abstract

Purpose

Can marginalized stakeholders whose issues with the firm are unaddressed because of their resource and legitimacy constraints (low salience) increase their salience by capitalizing on certain inherent properties of their stakeholder environment? The purpose of this paper is to examine this question using a real life case of the Coca-Cola controversy in Kerala, India, where a group of local aboriginals succeeded against all odds in shutting down a Coca-Cola plant which was allegedly polluting their water resources. The analysis of the longitudinal data collected in this case supported the hypotheses that the ability of marginalized stakeholders to increase their salience by influencing other stakeholders depends both on the attributes of other stakeholders (favorable, unfavorable and indifferent), and the triadic relationships among them. The triadic relationships among stakeholders show a tendency toward balance, and become particularly relevant when the marginalized stakeholder’s issues are perceived to have low legitimacy due to their normative nature (which makes them difficult to be translated into economic terms). The findings offer important insights to both marginalized stakeholders and firms, on proactively managing their stakeholder environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a single case: the controversy surrounding Coca-Cola in Kerala, India, and conduct a longitudinal study examining both qualitative and quantitative data.

Findings

The findings indicate that marginalized stakeholders can capitalize on certain inherent properties of their stakeholder networks and increase their salience to influence the focal firm. Specifically, the authors find that stakeholder salience is a function of both the dyadic relationships between stakeholders, and the triadic relationships among them. These triadic relationships tend to a state of balance over time. The authors also find that when the stakeholder issue is normative in nature the triadic relationships are more important in increasing stakeholder salience.

Originality/value

The authors conduct an original case study research, with primary qualitative data collected by the authors. The authors also develop a quantitative model to examine this data to arrive at the findings. Therefore the authors contribute both theoretically and empirically to stakeholder salience literature.

Details

Annals in Social Responsibility, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3515

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2008

J. Andrew Choi

This case study examines the interactive marketing initiatives of Coca-Cola China Company for one of its marquee Olympic properties, the Olympic Torch Relay. It provides…

Abstract

This case study examines the interactive marketing initiatives of Coca-Cola China Company for one of its marquee Olympic properties, the Olympic Torch Relay. It provides insights into building increased brand interaction by adding an online interactive component to an age-old concept in Olympic activations.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Yan Tian

This is a case study of Coca‐Cola's Chinese web site. It aims to examine how Coca‐Cola, the number one brand in the world, is using its web site to communicate with the…

Abstract

Purpose

This is a case study of Coca‐Cola's Chinese web site. It aims to examine how Coca‐Cola, the number one brand in the world, is using its web site to communicate with the publics in the world's largest market.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses a qualitative text analysis.

Findings

Coca‐Cola is practicing a “glocal” strategy, which integrates the ethnocentric and polycentric model in international public relations, to communicate with the Chinese publics through its Chinese web site.

Originality/value

This study provides insights for understanding the theory and practice of global corporate public relations.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Leo Paul Dana and Teresa E. Dana

Singapore‐based F&N and Bangkok‐based Thai Pure Drinks launched a joint venture to bottle Coca‐Cola in Vietnam. However, Pepsi is the market leader here. For Coca‐Cola to…

Abstract

Singapore‐based F&N and Bangkok‐based Thai Pure Drinks launched a joint venture to bottle Coca‐Cola in Vietnam. However, Pepsi is the market leader here. For Coca‐Cola to succeed, many factors must be considered, including cultural factors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Tamar Barkay

By focusing on the intra‐organization dimension of corporate social responsibility (CSR), this paper aims to offer an ethnographic analysis of the way Coca‐Cola integrates…

Abstract

Purpose

By focusing on the intra‐organization dimension of corporate social responsibility (CSR), this paper aims to offer an ethnographic analysis of the way Coca‐Cola integrates its re‐branding and marketing strategies with CSR and the processes through which this strategic agenda is diffused into the company's national franchise in Israel.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a combined qualitative methodology of interviews with managers and employees on all levels of the organization; participant observations of formal meetings, company events and informal gatherings; and document evaluation.

Findings

This paper shows how the CSR program is purposefully and rationally designed to meet the standards of a business case approach to CSR and that, accordingly, company managers integrate it into the activities of departments and divisions such as sales, marketing, and human resources (HR). The paper further shows that the cause‐marketing and product‐branding goals underlying the global re‐branding strategy of Coca‐Cola have been mediated through employee volunteering projects that are based on the recruitment and mobilization of the physical bodies of employees not only as “bodily‐corporate‐producers”, but also as “bodily‐corporate‐ambassadors”.

Research limitations/implications

The in‐depth empirical research that focused on a single corporation enabled the author to reach a better understanding of the intricate organizational processes involved in the implementation of CSR programs and their effects. At the same time, the research plan lacks a comparative examination of similar processes in other corporations. In this regard, this paper delineates the theoretical and empirical contours for future studies on the actual effects of implementation processes of the business case model for CSR.

Originality/value

The paper enriches a missing part in the literature regarding empirical examination of the impact of CSR at close range and at the level of individual firms.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

David J. Veale

Describes Coca‐Cola Foods’ mentoring and coaching programmes. Presents directions for future research and practice based on Coca‐Cola Foods’ experience.

Abstract

Describes Coca‐Cola Foods’ mentoring and coaching programmes. Presents directions for future research and practice based on Coca‐Cola Foods’ experience.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Olivia Freeman

The purpose of this paper is to propose the activity‐based focus group as a useful method with which to generate talk‐in‐interaction among pre‐schoolers. Analytically, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose the activity‐based focus group as a useful method with which to generate talk‐in‐interaction among pre‐schoolers. Analytically, it aims to illustrate how transcribed talk‐in‐interaction can be subjected to a discourse analytic lens, to produce insights into how pre‐schoolers use “Coca‐Cola” as a conversational resource with which to build product‐related meanings and social selves.

Design/methodology/approach

Fourteen activity‐based discussion groups with pre‐schoolers aged between two and five years have been conducted in a number of settings including privately run Montessori schools and community based preschools in Dublin. The talk generated through these groups has been transcribed using the conventions of conversation analysis (CA). Passages of talk characterized by the topic of Coca‐Cola were isolated and a sub‐sample of these are analysed here using a CA‐informed discourse analytic approach.

Findings

A number of linguistic repertoires are drawn on, including health, permission and age. Coca‐Cola is constructed as something which is “bad” and has the potential to make one “mad”. It is an occasion‐based product permitted by parents for example as a treat, at the cinema or at McDonalds. It can be utilised to build “age‐based” social selves. “Big” boys or girls can drink Coca‐Cola but it is not suitable for “babies”.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into the use of the activity‐based focus group as a data generation tool for use with pre‐schoolers. A discourse analytic approach to the interpretation of children's talk‐in‐interaction suggests that the preschool consumer is competent in accessing and employing a consumer artefact such as Coca‐Cola as a malleable resource with which to negotiate product meanings and social selves.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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