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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Xiande Zhao, Jinxing Xie and W.J. Zhang

This paper presents a study on the impacts of information sharing and ordering co‐ordination on the performance of a supply chain with one capacitated supplier and…

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5840

Abstract

This paper presents a study on the impacts of information sharing and ordering co‐ordination on the performance of a supply chain with one capacitated supplier and multiple retailers under demand uncertainty. In particular, a computer model is proposed to simulate inventory replenishment decisions by the retailers and production decisions by the supplier under different demand patterns and capacity tightness. It is found that information sharing and ordering co‐ordination significantly impact the supply chain performance in terms of both total cost and service level. It is also found that the value of sharing information and ordering co‐ordination is significantly affected by demand patterns and capacity tightness. Guidelines are developed for companies to share information and co‐ordinate orders under different conditions. These guidelines can help companies reduce costs and improve customer service levels in the supply chain.

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Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1992

Haydee S. Sheombar

Argues that, in order to use electronic data interchange (EDI)optimally, the current ways of working need to be redesigned. Here thesubject‐matter for redesign is the…

Abstract

Argues that, in order to use electronic data interchange (EDI) optimally, the current ways of working need to be redesigned. Here the subject‐matter for redesign is the boundary‐crossing logistical processes in the value‐adding partnerships of two organizations. The business redesigner needs, among other things, an understanding of the basic capabilities of EDI and of the concept of interorganizational co‐ordination. From the analysis of co‐ordination a classification of the information needed by logistical organizations results. Together with three basic co‐ordination mechanisms and a classification of messages, the classification provides a sound basis of understanding for the business redesigner.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Andrea Omicini and Franco Zambonelli

The increasing need to access and elaborate dynamic and heterogeneous information sources distributed over the Internet calls for new models and paradigms for application…

Abstract

The increasing need to access and elaborate dynamic and heterogeneous information sources distributed over the Internet calls for new models and paradigms for application design and development. The mobile agent paradigm promotes the design of applications where agents roam through Internet sites to locally access and elaborate information and resources, possibly co‐operating with each other. Focuses on mobile agent co‐ordination, and presents the TuCSoN co‐ordination model for Internet applications based on mobile information agents. TuCSoN exploits a notion of local tuple‐based interaction space, called a tuple centre. A tuple centre is a tuple space enhanced with the capability of programming its behaviour in response to communication events. This enables properties to be embedded into the interaction space, and a mobile agent to be designed independently of the peculiarities of the information sources. Several issues critical to Internet applications can then be charged on tuple centres transparently to agents. The effectiveness of the TuCSoN model is first shown by means of an application example in the area of Internet information retrieval, then discussed in the context of workflow management and electronic commerce.

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Internet Research, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Sebastiaan J.H. Rietjens, Hans Voordijk and Sirp J. De Boer

This paper seeks to contribute to a more effective co‐ordination of humanitarian operations by military and civilian organizations involved in a peace support mission in…

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1655

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to contribute to a more effective co‐ordination of humanitarian operations by military and civilian organizations involved in a peace support mission in response to a complex emergency.

Design/methodology/approach

The information processing view, in particular Galbraith's typology of generic mechanisms for achieving co‐ordination, is taken as the theoretical framework. This framework is subsequently applied to the co‐ordination of humanitarian operations by military and civilian organizations. Empirical data are derived from a set of expert interviews with both military and civilian respondents in The Netherlands and a four week visit to Kabul and Baghlan, a province in northern Afghanistan. During this visit 40 military respondents have been interviewed and over 60 meetings have been held with local authorities, humanitarian organizations, small entrepreneurs, refugees and local villagers. Finally, conclusions are drawn and recommendations are provided with regard to a more effective co‐ordination of humanitarian operations in a peace support mission.

Findings

The article's main finding is that “self‐contained tasks” in combination with lateral relations are the dominant co‐ordination mechanisms. “Slack resources”, though observed in practice, is not considered a viable co‐ordination mechanism since this implies an excess, and thus waste, of scarce resources. “Information systems” are, unfortunately, not well‐developed leading to mismatches between policy and practice. Keeping “self‐contained tasks” as the major co‐ordination mechanism, the main recommendation is to develop and implement innovative “information systems”, that can also be used to support “lateral relations”, in particular those between military and civil actors.

Originality/value

The paper applies the information processing perspective to a unique and important subject, namely co‐ordination between military and humanitarian organizations in peace support missions.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Winter Nie and Scott T. Young

Consensus building plays an important role in strategy formulation and implementation. Previous researchers have attempted to find a link between goal consensus among top…

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1760

Abstract

Consensus building plays an important role in strategy formulation and implementation. Previous researchers have attempted to find a link between goal consensus among top management and organizational performance, mainly in manufacturing settings, with varying results. Few extant studies have examined goal consensus at the functional level. Aims to expand our knowledge of the goal consensus/performance relationship by focusing on the relationship between operations and marketing in the service setting. Attempts to identify the types of co‐ordination mechanisms that help achieve functional goal consensus between operations and marketing. Finds a positive relationship between goal consensus of the marketing and operations managers and performance based on return on equity and return on assets. Concludes that consensus is correlated with the use of process and programming co‐ordination mechanisms and not correlated with the use of interpersonal co‐ordination mechanisms.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Rachel L. Finn and David Wright

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether existing organisations that seek to integrate a range of stakeholders (i.e. senior citizens, industry, academics, public…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether existing organisations that seek to integrate a range of stakeholders (i.e. senior citizens, industry, academics, public authorities, civil society organisations and the media) in the field of information and communication technology (ICT) and ageing are adequately meeting the needs of each of these stakeholder groups, and to determine whether a new, or re‐organised, mechanism is needed to better meet the needs of stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify, describe, assess and compare the adequacy of various candidate multi‐stakeholder mechanisms in order to improve stakeholder co‐operation.

Findings

The authors' principal finding is that the stakeholder co‐ordination mechanisms discussed in this paper are not adequate to foster e‐inclusion co‐operation, co‐ordination and collaboration among all different types of stakeholders.

Practical implications

This analysis offers direction in how a new organisation, or the expansion of an existing mechanism, could ensure that currently un‐met needs are addressed. The strengths and weaknesses of the stakeholder co‐ordination mechanisms discussed here demonstrate that some organisational types are better for performing certain tasks and for integrating particular types of stakeholder. Thus, a federated, multi‐dimensional organisation offers one possibility for addressing the needs of all different types of stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper provides an avenue of response to various calls for closer stakeholder collaboration by the European Commission and other stakeholders, in order to improve the quality of life for older persons and to meet European social objectives.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Humberto Maturana Romesín

To reflect on the matter of self‐consciousness.

Abstract

Purpose

To reflect on the matter of self‐consciousness.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose is achieved through the process of answering four questions presented to me by Heinz von Foerster in the course of our many conversations.

Findings

It is not possible to understand the nature of self‐consciousness without understanding the operation of human beings as living systems that exist as emotional languaging living systems: self‐consciousness is a manner of living.

Practical implications

We human beings can become more aware of our responsibility in the design of robots that imitate us.

Originality/value

Reflects on what makes us humans special, on subjective experience, and on the world we bring forth.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

John L. Kent

Presents a conceptual framework and a set of research hypotheses that are intended to help explain the interfunctional co‐ordination between the logistics and information…

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1518

Abstract

Presents a conceptual framework and a set of research hypotheses that are intended to help explain the interfunctional co‐ordination between the logistics and information technology functions. Much has been written over the past decade regarding the strategic potential of the logistics and information technology functions for creating customer value, process efficiencies, and differential advantage for the firm. Additionally, the interrelationships that exist within business organizations have received considerable discussion within the literature. However, little attention has been paid to the co‐ordination of the logistics and information technology functions. The framework presented is based on a combined review of the logistics, information technology, and interfunctional co‐ordination literature. The constructs of interaction and collaboration are utilized to explain how differing levels of interfunctional co‐ordination affect the firm’s logistics information system. Initial support for the conceptual framework is provided by qualitative research. Finally, research results and concluding comments on implications for practitioners and future research are discussed.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Alice E. Hills

Co‐ordination is seen as a key element in UK disaster‐response planning,although the term is used synonymously with co‐operation and liaison byboth the Home Office and the…

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934

Abstract

Co‐ordination is seen as a key element in UK disaster‐response planning, although the term is used synonymously with co‐operation and liaison by both the Home Office and the organizations involved. This lack of clarity shows the ad hoc nature of both the legislation and management practices governing the response. Argues that, as a result, co‐ordination may be an inappropriate goal; co‐operation may be preferable and more accessible. Highlights key elements influencing current trends, together with practical and theoretical issues from the move towards a simplified response. Concludes that co‐ordination by feedback will continue to dominate because it is in accord with past practice. This will ensure that co‐ordination is both confined to specific functions and used as a general exhortation, even though co‐operation may be a more accurate description of the key element in UK disaster response.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Wolfram Elsner

The paper starts from the increasing spatial and functional fragmentation of value‐added chains, global de‐regulation and dis‐embedding of “markets”, and interdependencies…

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1636

Abstract

The paper starts from the increasing spatial and functional fragmentation of value‐added chains, global de‐regulation and dis‐embedding of “markets”, and interdependencies among the Net‐based digital technologies. It develops a socio‐economic setting with ubiquitous direct interdependencies and interactions, Net‐externalities, “strategic” strong uncertainty, and omnipresent collective‐good and social‐dilemma problems. These entail co‐ordination failures, either in the form of conventional market failure (i.e. collective blockages of action) or of “wrong” or outmoded institutional co‐ordination and, thus, wide‐spread technological “lock‐ins” that are indicative of insufficient ability of collective action. This is particularly true for de‐regulated, individualistic cultures. In contrast, sustainable innovation, used in a broad, i.e. technological and institutional, sense, requires an effective collective action competence. This, in turn, requires a new and increased co‐ordination. Against this background, the global corporate economy has spontaneously developed private individualist substitute arrangements to cope with the new complexity, such as local clusters and hub‐and‐spoke networks, which all have severe shortcomings. With reference to what we call the “Linux” paradigm, the paper discusses the possibility of a spontaneous evolutionary, i.e. collectively learned, institutional co‐ordination through emergent collective action and networks with “good” governance. The paper argues that only a hybrid system that consists of “well‐governed” networks and a new approach towards more comprehensive and deliberate “interactive” and “institutional” public policy, supporting collective learning and emergent institutional co‐ordination, is capable of solving the complexity and co‐ordination problems of the “new” economy by increasing certainty, stability and more continuous and comprehensive innovation. This new policy approach is outlined at the end.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 31 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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