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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1985

Gerard P. Finnegan

Investigates has worker co‐operatives undertake their marketingactivities and the ways in which they differ from conventional businesses.States that marketing activities…

Abstract

Investigates has worker co‐operatives undertake their marketing activities and the ways in which they differ from conventional businesses. States that marketing activities of the traditional wholesale or retail co‐operative movement are not of concern here. Notes that there has been a marked increase in the number of worker co‐operatives since the 1970s. Suggests that they will only survive it they arm to meet the needs of their customer groups better than their competitors rather than giving precedence to their social objectives.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Gordon Foxall

The United Kingdom differs from most of its partners in the European Community in that its farmers generally prefer non co‐operative channels of distribution for their…

Abstract

The United Kingdom differs from most of its partners in the European Community in that its farmers generally prefer non co‐operative channels of distribution for their produce. The proportion of farm produce distributed through co‐operatives is considerably smaller than is generally the case in Europe. This paper is concerned with the contribution of co‐operative organisational structure and behaviour to the variations in co‐operative market shares found in European agriculture. It is argued that there is a clear relationship between organisational factors and the market position of the co‐operative sector in each country and that this has implications for the encouragement of co‐operative organisation which is an aim of UK public policy.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Getu Hailu, Scott R. Jeffrey and Ellen W. Goddard

The agribusiness co-operative sector in Canada has been affected by ongoing changes in economic, political, and social policies. Increased competition from local…

Abstract

The agribusiness co-operative sector in Canada has been affected by ongoing changes in economic, political, and social policies. Increased competition from local investor-owned firms and multinational companies, deregulation and globalization of trade and increased concentration of suppliers and purchasers have put tremendous competitive pressure on agribusiness marketing co-operatives. The enhanced level of competitive rivalry may force co-operatives into lowering costs and prices. Improvement in cost or operating efficiency of agribusiness marketing co-operatives may be crucial as changes in regulation, technology, and other market developments bring into question the long-term viability of co-operative businesses. Therefore, information as to the efficiency with which agribusiness co-operative firms operate would be useful.

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Cooperative Firms in Global Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1389-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1992

J.T.J. Lamont

Reports on a comparative study of the types and degrees ofhorizontal and vertical integration within the seed potato industries ofThe Netherlands and Northern Ireland…

Abstract

Reports on a comparative study of the types and degrees of horizontal and vertical integration within the seed potato industries of The Netherlands and Northern Ireland. Using an integration analysis grid, presents descriptive models of the integrative functions in both industries. Given the superior marketing performance of the Dutch industry, and the way in which this is facilitated by its highly integrated organizational structure, makes a case for the utilization of both horizontal and vertical integration in improving marketing performance in seed potato industries.

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Case study
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Mukund R. Dixit

This case describes the challenges faced by Amul in organising dairy farmers into a co-operative and creating continuous opportunities for value addition. Participants in…

Abstract

This case describes the challenges faced by Amul in organising dairy farmers into a co-operative and creating continuous opportunities for value addition. Participants in the case discussion are required to review the developments in the organisation and recommend a strategy for the future.

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Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Tim Mazzarol, Geoffrey Soutar and Elena Mamouni Limnios

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a large-scale survey of members of co-operative and mutual enterprises (CMEs) that examines the factors influencing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a large-scale survey of members of co-operative and mutual enterprises (CMEs) that examines the factors influencing members’ intentions to remain loyal to the enterprise and to provide word of mouth (WOM).

Design/methodology/approach

A model was suggested and tested to examine the interrelationships between constructs measuring emotional, functional and financial value, affective and continuance commitment, intention to remain loyal to a CME and WOM communication. A large sample was drawn from a range of co-operative and mutual enterprises, and the suggested model was estimated using a partial least squares approach.

Findings

Significant relationships were found between all constructs. However, emotional value and affective commitment were found to have particularly strong relationships. Emotional value had a strong influence on both affective and continuance commitment, while affective commitment had a strong influence on loyalty and WOM.

Originality/value

This paper provides empirical support for suggestions about the factors that influence member loyalty within CMEs and the relative importance of non-financial motivations. It also provides a strong foundation upon which directors and executive managers of CMEs can build more effective member marketing and communications strategies.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Book part
Publication date: 11 April 2012

Reidar Almås and Jostein Brobakk

Purpose – Dairy has been the backbone of agriculture in regional Norway, and the processing of milk has been dominated by co-operatives owned by milk farmers. During the…

Abstract

Purpose – Dairy has been the backbone of agriculture in regional Norway, and the processing of milk has been dominated by co-operatives owned by milk farmers. During the social democratic order (1945–1979), productivist agriculture thrived, while a more multifunctional agriculture was developed after 1980. As a measure against overproduction, a quota system was introduced in 1983. The purpose of this study is to see if there are signs of a neo-productivism revival after climate change and other global shocks, like the food crisis, featured prominently on the political agenda.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter reviews the radical structural changes in Norwegian dairy production since the early 1960s, which reduced the number of milk farms radically from 148,000 in 1959 to almost 16,000 in 2009. According to the Agricultural Agreement between the Norwegian government and the farmers' organisations, the co-operatives are given an important semi-public role as market-price regulators and stock keepers. This Norwegian system may be described as a classical regulated dairy regime. The Norwegian dairy regime has been through several deregulations and re-regulations over the last 20 years, partly forced by internal pressures and partly inspired by liberalisation tendencies abroad.

Findings – After mid-1990s, there has been an increase in the number of joint dairy farms, where individual ownership of land is maintained while herds, buildings and machinery are merged. Three thousand six hundred thirty dairy farmers are now participating in 1,510 joint farming firms, producing 29 per cent of the milk in Norway. This rapid growth of joint farming is transforming the dairy sector in Norway. Analysis has shown that its evolution is closely tied to farmer socio-economic demands, including social benefits, such as increased leisure time, and security during illness. While there has been pressure to increase productivity, the food crisis changed attitudes, making the current policy of import tariffs and subsidies easier to defend.

Originality/value – This chapter shows that neo-liberalism in Norway was not pursued as far as in most other OECD countries, although some deregulation was taking place. Norwegian agricultural policies are still regulating the sector to a substantial degree, with the annual Agricultural Agreement negotiations serving as a centrepiece. Norway has ambitious climate goals, and by 2020 greenhouse gases emissions should be reduced to 30 per cent of the 1990 rate. A further goal is that Norway will be carbon neutral by 2030. As part of the implementation of its climate policy, a White Paper on agriculture and climate change was put forward in May 2009. For Norwegian food production as a whole, a change towards more grazing at the expense of crops would improve carbon storage and reduce the overall use of fertiliser. Such a shift in land use would benefit the dairy sector, in part because of easier access to domestically grown cow feed.

Details

Rethinking Agricultural Policy Regimes: Food Security, Climate Change and the Future Resilience of Global Agriculture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-349-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Chrysoula Lamprinopoulou, Angela Tregear and Mitchell Ness

Many previous studies have indicated that by acting collectively, agrifood SMEs can improve performance and enhance their contribution to local areas. Although collective…

Abstract

Purpose

Many previous studies have indicated that by acting collectively, agrifood SMEs can improve performance and enhance their contribution to local areas. Although collective action between agrifood SMEs proliferates in many southern European countries, relatively few successful cases appear to exist in Greece. The purpose of this paper is to explore the reasons for this, by relating the theoretical conditions of successful collective action to evidence from existing studies on the Greek situation.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the literature on small firm networks, and previous empirical studies of agrifood SMEs in Europe, the paper identifies six conditions that underpin successful collective action: three contextual (type of market, social cohesiveness, institutional involvement) and three behavioural (market orientation, co‐operative spirit, existence of an initiator).

Findings

Relating these conditions to existing evidence on Greek agrifood SMEs, the analysis suggests that socio‐cultural factors and institutional involvement are often barriers to successful collective action. However, the presence of at least some examples of strong agrifood SME networks in Greece indicates that such barriers can be overcome. The paper concludes by identifying the research questions to be tackled by future empirical study of Greek agrifood SMEs.

Originality/value

The paper explores the important phenomenon of small firm networks in the under‐researched country of Greece. In addition, the paper also presents an original synthesis of key conditions under which collective action thrives, drawn from many previous studies of networks and collective action in the agrifood sector throughout Europe.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Yvonne von Friedrichs Grängsjö

Owing to the complexity of the tourist product most firms in a tourist destination are interdependent on one another. As well as being competitors they also have to work…

Abstract

Owing to the complexity of the tourist product most firms in a tourist destination are interdependent on one another. As well as being competitors they also have to work together on creating the overall quality of the total tourist product. It is difficult to separate co‐operation from competition. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a co‐opetitive theory of business derived from the results given by a networking study of marketing a tourist destination dominated by micro businesses and independent entrepreneurs. The results of the study show that there are two different sets of values in the destination and these determine and distinguish the way firms are involved in networking.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Hristos Vakoufaris, Ioannis Spilanis and Thanasis Kizos

The purpose of this paper is to present the existing forms of collective action in the Greek agrifood sector and to focus on co‐operatives, the dominant form of collective…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the existing forms of collective action in the Greek agrifood sector and to focus on co‐operatives, the dominant form of collective action in the agrifood sector of the North Aegean region.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on six contextual and behavioural conditions under which collective action may emerge.

Findings

This paper shows that very successful co‐operatives, according to the six contextual and behavioural conditions, co‐exist with unsuccessful ones, which are characterised by inflexibilities and inability to respond to a constantly changing market. Moreover, the legal status of some co‐operatives (obligatory co‐operatives) is of great interest.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to categorise existing forms of collective action in the Greek agrifood sector. Moreover, it gives information about the co‐operatives of the North Aegean region, based on three research programmes that were conducted in the region.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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