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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Nicole Cunningham and Christine De Meyer-Heydenrych

Within the highly competitive clothing retail industry, retailers (both affordable and premium) need to consider which customer experience elements drive customer…

1360

Abstract

Purpose

Within the highly competitive clothing retail industry, retailers (both affordable and premium) need to consider which customer experience elements drive customer satisfaction and repurchase intentions. The purpose of this study is to determine whether customer expectations are different for various types of clothing retailers, and what customers specifically expect when purchasing from a retailer.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, a positivistic quantitative research design and a non-probability convenience sampling method were used. A total of 222 useable questionnaires were used to conduct descriptive statistics. Confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modelling and multi-group analysis were run to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that customers expect affordable retailers to provide them with convenience and to create a positive shopping experience, while premium clothing retailers should offer added-value and convenience. In addition, the presence of other customers influences the experience. For both groups, satisfaction was a predictor of loyalty, which, in turn, was a predictor of repurchase intentions.

Originality/value

The study is unique as it compares the customer expectations for satisfaction and repurchase intentions for both affordable retailers and premium retailers. The study is conducted in an emerging market context where the growth of the retailing industry is visible. By conducting this study, both affordable and premium clothing retailers are more informed with regards to their customer's expectations and how those expectations should be managed in order to ensure satisfaction and repurchase intention.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Bart L. MacCarthy and P.G.S.A. Jayarathne

The study seeks to classify retailer‐driven clothing supply networks to provide new insights on their structure and operation and examine whether or not differences are…

4063

Abstract

Purpose

The study seeks to classify retailer‐driven clothing supply networks to provide new insights on their structure and operation and examine whether or not differences are evident in the types of networks operated by different types of retailer.

Design/methodology/approach

A large‐scale empirical investigation is conducted of 73 supply networks operating with 26 Sri Lankan apparel manufacturers, representing 39 major retailers. In‐depth interviews and survey methods are used, representing qualitative and quantitative approaches, respectively.

Findings

Six primary types of clothing supply network are identified. A strong association is shown between retailer type and network type, specifically for networks operated by established brand retailers and by value players such as supermarket retailers. The typical attributes of the supply networks of each type of retailer are compared.

Research limitations/implications

Although the empirical study is large, it is limited to supply networks with prime manufacturing partners located in Sri Lanka. The country is important in global clothing production, serving many prominent global retailers. Studying and comparing supply networks anchored in other regions will provide a valuable comparison with the findings here.

Practical implications

The study has implications for clothing retailers in analyzing, managing and developing their networks. For manufacturers, it provides insights to understand the network structures operated by different types of retailer for different classes of garment. The study also offers insights for policy makers in clothing producing regions.

Originality/value

A new empirically based classification is presented for clothing supply networks. The diversity in network types has not previously been shown. The comparison of networks of established brand retailers and value players provides empirical evidence of differences not reported previously. The findings enrich both the theoretical and empirical bases for sector‐specific supply network studies.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Ravi Pappu and Pascale G. Quester

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether retailer brand equity levels vary between department store and specialty clothing store categories.

5790

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether retailer brand equity levels vary between department store and specialty clothing store categories.

Design/methodology/approach

Retailer brand equity is conceptualized in this paper as a four‐dimensional construct comprising retailer awareness, retailer associations, retailer perceived quality and retailer loyalty. Categorization theory is used to explain the differences in retailer equity across the two different store categories. A doubly multivariate design is incorporated in a structured questionnaire used to collect data via mall‐intercepts in an Australian state capital city.

Findings

Results suggest that retailer brand equity varies significantly between department store and specialty store categories. Department store brands yielded significantly higher ratings for all the retailer brand equity dimensions than specialty store brands.

Originality/value

Researchers have argued that retailers possess brand equity. However, extant research does not provide any specific guidance in relation to the question of whether retailer brand equity levels vary from one store category to another. The present research fills an important gap by demonstrating that retailer brand equity levels vary significantly between department store and specialty clothing store categories.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Helen Goworek, Tom Fisher, Tim Cooper, Sophie Woodward and Alex Hiller

This paper aims to investigate consumers' perspectives on sustainable clothing consumption and to examine ways in which this information could influence retailers' policies.

19193

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate consumers' perspectives on sustainable clothing consumption and to examine ways in which this information could influence retailers' policies.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was conducted using focus groups, home tasks and workshops with 99 participants. The sample represented different groups of consumers in relation to their sustainability behaviour.

Findings

Focus group participants had a limited awareness of the sustainability impacts of clothing. Where participants displayed pro‐environmental behaviour, this was not necessarily intentional, but was largely a response to other influences. The respondents' maintenance and disposal of clothes were found to be influenced mainly by existing habits and routines, which usually take precedence over awareness of sustainable practice. The research indicated that consumers could be persuaded to change their behaviour in relation to sustainability by being encouraged and enabled to reflect more on their behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses qualitative research and is limited to UK consumers. Future research in this field could incorporate quantitative methods or in‐depth interviews. Academics could conduct further research and generate theories which apply to the sustainable consumption of clothing.

Social implications

The findings have implications for retailers, academics and society. Retailers can develop and implement more sustainable policies and practices in relation to clothing production and consumption. There are wider implications for society and the environment in that retailers' practices can impact greatly on the sustainability of the planet's resources.

Originality/value

This paper's originality lies in its assessment of the implications for retailers of consumers' views on the sustainable consumption of clothing.

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Helen Goworek

The purpose of this paper is to assess the issues currently involved in social and environmental sustainability in the clothing industry.

20007

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the issues currently involved in social and environmental sustainability in the clothing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a case study approach to investigate a business that operates successfully in this challenging market.

Findings

As a consequence of increasing demand for ethical clothing, it has become standard practice for UK clothing retailers to develop CSR policies which impact upon their methods of garment sourcing and partnerships with suppliers. There is also a significant trend for retailers to offer ethical clothing ranges made from organic cotton or produced by Fair Trade manufacturers. The paper includes a case study on People Tree, which sells Fair Trade clothing sourced from developing countries. People Tree is rare amongst clothing companies in that it provides customers with a transparent view of its production sources via the internet. The company provides an example of how socially responsible and environmentally sustainable global sourcing can be applied in practice.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on aspects of sustainability in an individual retailer. This could be extended to other ethical retailers in different countries, and a longitudinal study of such companies could be conducted.

Originality/value

Literature on ethical fashion companies and their use of socially responsible strategies is sparse, and there is a lack of research that covers both social and environmental sustainability in this market. This paper fills some of the gaps.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Erik Sandberg, Rudrajeet Pal and Jukka Hemilä

The purpose of this paper is to explore the processes of value creation and appropriation among companies in a reverse clothing supply chain.

1581

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the processes of value creation and appropriation among companies in a reverse clothing supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on an inductive case study approach at fashion retailers, charity organisations, commercial recyclers, and specialised sorting companies involved in take-back schemes for used clothes in the reverse clothing supply chain.

Findings

Value creation and appropriation processes are illustrated for different members of the reverse clothing supply chain. Results of different types of value and value co-creation explain the relatively high degree of collaboration among members in the “beginning” of the reverse supply chain. Here, collaboration outmanoeuvres the traditional value appropriation mechanism of price negotiation.

Research limitations/implications

This research does not cover all tiers in this global industry, and practices among different regions may hamper the generalisability of the findings presented.

Practical implications

This research allows a comprehensive picture of the members in the reverse clothing supply chain and outlines some of the major processes involved, decisive for value creation, and appropriation.

Originality/value

The research draws upon the value concept and combines processes of value creation and appropriation in one, single empirical study. By doing that, the research disseminates the reverse clothing supply chain in a new way and facilitates improved understanding of the structure and rationales for members taking part in it.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Terry M. Robinson and Jayne Bailey

Discount retailing in the UK has taken on a higher profile over recentyears owing to the effects of the recession. Interest has largelycentred on the growth of discount…

3635

Abstract

Discount retailing in the UK has taken on a higher profile over recent years owing to the effects of the recession. Interest has largely centred on the growth of discount grocery retailing and the potential emergence of US‐style warehouse clubs. Nine discount clothing retailers currently present in “conventional” retail environments were studied. Examines in particular the nature of discounting and the business practices employed by those discount retailers. Suggests that discount clothing retailing in the UK is characterized by: both core business discounters and clearance outlets; a high degree of planned purchasing as a result of own‐label activity, information technology and relationships with manufacturers; importance of image and service in attracting customers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Mike Pretious and Mary Love

This paper investigates purchasing ethics within the UK clothing retail sector in the context of structural changes in the sector and the growth of international sourcing…

15048

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates purchasing ethics within the UK clothing retail sector in the context of structural changes in the sector and the growth of international sourcing as a necessary strategic tool to maintain competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the background to retailer interest in sourcing ethics and the development of codes of conduct to guide retail purchasing professionals. The primary research is an exploratory examination of the experiences of UK retail buying personnel working in the global market for garments, who are required to make decisions “on the ground” that reflect the ethical codes of their companies, yet who are also constrained by the need to make profitable sourcing decisions.

Findings

The conclusions assess what can be learnt from these experiences and offer suggestions for future research.

Originality/value

The paper is of interest to any retail academics, personnel and employees.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Rudrajeet Pal

The purpose of this paper is to identify the major reverse logistics design aspects in used clothing value chains, and those enabling and challenging manifestation of…

2503

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the major reverse logistics design aspects in used clothing value chains, and those enabling and challenging manifestation of value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on an exploratory study of 12 established organizations in Swedish used clothing networks. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews, secondary sources, and subsequent field visits.

Findings

Empirical insights on how various design aspects influence value creation in used clothing value chains are provided. Crucial among these are strategic and consistent collection, presence of multi-channel sales, and communication of post-retail concepts for manifesting value by bolstering consumer satisfaction, environmental motivation, and corporate image. Inter-organizational collaboration in reverse logistics processes and workplace training, further renders higher economic, environmental and information values.

Research limitations/implications

The paper proposes a holistic framework of design aspects in reverse value chains, and extends existing knowledge on how these aspects manifest value creation. By doing so, a nuanced view of the design aspects is offered by highlighting how they can differentially, either enable, or challenge value creation. In this connection, seven supporting propositions are developed for in-depth future research.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the devising strategic solutions for higher value creation, by understanding of the key enablers and challenges, for many actors in the used clothing networks.

Originality/value

The role of various design aspects in reverse value chains for manifesting multifaceted stakeholder value creation is explicitly defined in the paper.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2019

Karan Khurana and Ruth Tadesse

This paper aims to highlight the relevance of second-hand clothing (SHC) in the Ethiopian textile and apparel value chain by investigating its potential and establishing a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the relevance of second-hand clothing (SHC) in the Ethiopian textile and apparel value chain by investigating its potential and establishing a connect to sustainability from a consumption point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary and secondary methods of research were used in this research. Structured observational technique was used to identify the retailers in the city. In total, 70 retailers of SHC were identified and 15 big size retailers were interviewed with open end questions through judgment sampling method.

Findings

From the analysis of the field research and scientific literature, the authors strongly believe that SHC has an important space in the consumer retail segment of the country. This trade remains in the shadow but is sustaining livelihoods of citizens. The SHC trade provides an automatic balance to the future excessive consumption which is a result of mass production and hence should be encouraged further on various dimensions.

Originality/value

Existing literature exhibits statistics of the trade and impact in East African Community (EAC) missing out on Ethiopia as it is not a member of the EAC. Moreover a connection of SHC to sustainability established has never been established in the past for under-developing countries, and it is one of the critical factors in the success of used clothing and future of textile and apparel business. This research also provides channelized solutions to the business for smooth implementation of SHC in Ethiopia and other under-developing countries.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

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