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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Sumukh Hungund and Venkatesh Mani

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing small and medium enterprises’ (SMEs) adoption of innovation approaches.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing small and medium enterprises’ (SMEs) adoption of innovation approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involves two steps. First, all the variables relevant to the adoption of innovation in SMEs are identified. Subsequently, primary data are gathered from decision makers of 213 SMEs, and a multinomial logistic regression analysis is performed.

Findings

The results indicate that SMEs adopt both open innovation and closed innovation approaches. The firm-level factors such as firm age, firm size, education qualification, work experience and culture, and external factors such as customers, competition, technological advances and ecosystem influence adoption of open innovation approach compared to closed innovation approach. Factors such as culture among firm-level factors and competition among external factors influence the adoption of closed innovation approach.

Practical implications

The study helps the managers or the decision makers of the SMEs to know the suitable factors influencing the firm to adopt innovation which could potentially help the firms in their business strategy.

Originality/value

The study explores the adoption of innovation approaches of SMEs in emerging economies. The outcomes of this research have far-reaching implications for theory and practitioners in emerging economies.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2013

Pooran Wynarczyk

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of open innovation practices on the innovation capability and export performance of UK small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of open innovation practices on the innovation capability and export performance of UK small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical (quantitative) investigation is based on a sample of 64 SMEs in the UK – 33 “open” innovation firms and 31 “closedinnovation firms.

Findings

The overall results demonstrate that the international competitiveness of SMEs is highly dependent on the cumulative effects and interrelationship between two key internal components, i.e. R&D capacity and managerial structure and competencies, coupled with two external factors, i.e. open innovation practices and the ability of the firm to attract government grants for R&D and technological development.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the size of the sample, it has not been possible to undertake research within the context of specific regional disparities and/or sectoral characteristics.

Practical implications

In order to achieve and sustain competitive advantage in today's global market, SMEs need to collaborate with universities and other firms to advance and commercialise their technologies through “open innovation”.

Originality/value

Results show that open innovation activities and their impact on the international competitiveness of SMEs are complex and multi‐faceted. Essentially, they are highly related to and dependent upon the cumulative effects of, and interrelationship between, several key internal and external factors. Such factors cannot be fully explored through qualitative approaches as they require more complex and rigorous statistical analyses.

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Mohammad Alawamleh, Loiy Bani Ismail, Khaled Aladwan and Aya Saleh

The purpose of this paper is to examine critically the different influences of open/closed innovation on employees’ performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine critically the different influences of open/closed innovation on employees’ performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes into account the different influence of open and closed innovation on the performance of employees. Some previous literature was reviewed and the quantitative method used a structured questionnaire to collect primary data from participants.

Findings

The results indicated that open innovation was more influential on the performance of employees than closed innovation. It also appeared that the case study organization uses the open innovation approach in the investments department to attract more clients and investments and thus increase its benefits.

Practical implications

The paper presents a critical account of differences in the influence on employees’ performance between open and closed innovation; it also takes into account the pros and cons of both aspects and their influence on the overall performance of the organization, putting into perspective the recommendations for the best approach to guarantee a good orientation within the internal environment of the organization. Finally, it helps in understanding the best approach to attract talent and creativity to the organization.

Originality/value

It is expected that the current research will offer guidance to organizations in Jordan to draw up plans for effective management of innovative approaches both internally and externally. It highlights the practice of open innovation and its role in attracting talent to the organization, to boost employees’ performance.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Adele Parmentola, Michele Simoni and Ilaria Tutore

The purpose of this paper is to propose a comprehensive theoretical framework to explain the different diffusion dynamics of a technology realized under an open source…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a comprehensive theoretical framework to explain the different diffusion dynamics of a technology realized under an open source (OS) regime vs a technology realized under a closed-proprietary (CP) regime.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a systematic combining approach, theoretical predictions derived from literature on diffusion of innovation and on open innovation were matched with empirical observations derived from a case study of two mobile operation systems, which were released under different technological regimes.

Findings

This paper proposes a theoretical framework and a set of original theoretical propositions that can help to explain the differences in the diffusion dynamics of technologies that are released under different regimes (i.e. CP vs OS).

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides managers a better understanding of the diffusion dynamics of technologies released according to an open innovation strategy. In addition, the empirical case study improves the understanding of an important industry (the MOS industry) that has not been fully investigated from the innovation diffusion perspective. Nevertheless, the efficacy and generalizability of the theoretical framework proposed in this paper require future empirical tests.

Originality/value

This paper makes an original contribution to the open innovation and innovation diffusion literature by linking, in a conceptual model, three antecedents of the diffusion of a new technology that previous literature has considered only separately: the regime under which the technology is released (OS vs CP), the contingencies related to the characteristics of the technology and to the network of its adopters, and the resulting barriers to adoption.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Stefanie Bröring and Philipp Herzog

The purpose of this paper is to analyse different organisational tools of business development used in practice. This analysis seeks to address the question of how an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse different organisational tools of business development used in practice. This analysis seeks to address the question of how an organisation can achieve the recurring shift from exploration to exploitation and at the same time manage to balance its open and closed innovation tools.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical basis for analysing the organisational implications of open vs closed innovation is built by Creavis, the business venturing arm of Degussa AG, a specialty chemicals company headquartered in Germany.

Findings

Companies face the ambiguity of creating new business options and exploiting these at a later stage. Since exploitative and explorative units require a different organisational set‐up, it is difficult for a company to shift its exploratory endeavours to exploitative means. The presented case study offers an answer to this dilemma by showing how organisations manage to combine both by a unique organisational set‐up allowing for an evolutionary approach of shifting exploratory work into exploitative results.

Practical implications

The insights derived from the case study clearly present a way of dealing with ambidexterity in new business development. The in‐depth analysis advances the understanding of how organisations may successfully conduct business development and, in particular, which organisational tools they may use.

Originality/value

This paper is based on an original case study by the authors. It integrates management theory with a real life example to foster management research in new business development and the particular question of how to deal with the need of organisations to combine both exploratory and exploitative units and support their interaction as well as employing different approaches to innovation, i.e. open vs closed innovation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Matthias Inauen and Andrea Schenker‐Wicki

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of inside‐out open innovation (as opposed to closed innovation) on firm innovation performance. Inside‐out open…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of inside‐out open innovation (as opposed to closed innovation) on firm innovation performance. Inside‐out open innovation involves the exploitation of existing internal technologies through innovation and commercialization.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested empirically using survey data collected from stock‐listed companies in Germany, Switzerland and Austria. The data include the complete responses from 141 R&D managers for the period from 2004 to 2008.

Findings

The results reveal that companies that emphasize inside‐out open innovation are more likely to create radical innovations and tend to sell a greater number of new products. Companies pursuing closed innovation are more likely to exhibit a higher incremental product innovation performance.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional data approach and its dependency on the perceptions and experiences of the respondents has its limitations. Future research should extend the focus and concept of this study and explore additional closed and open innovation strategies.

Originality/value

The adoption of open innovation in practice has not been examined in depth. This study provides empirical insights into the open innovation approaches in German‐speaking countries and, by drawing important conclusions and implications for managers involved in the R&D processes, fills a gap in the innovation management literature.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Nancy Bocken and Paavo Ritala

Circular business models can improve resource use in a financially and environmentally feasible way. However, companies struggle to choose among the vast variety of ways…

Abstract

Purpose

Circular business models can improve resource use in a financially and environmentally feasible way. However, companies struggle to choose among the vast variety of ways to achieve circularity within a business model. The purpose of this paper is to offer a pragmatic guide for making strategic decisions on circular business models.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a conceptual model of six different strategic approaches to circular business models and provides examples to business cases and practice to illustrate these.

Findings

This study identifies two critical strategy choices companies should make. First, an innovation strategy addresses the extent to which circularity is achieved with internal or external stakeholders. Second, a resource strategy addresses how companies achieve circularity by narrowing, slowing or closing resource loops. Using examples from business practice, this study illustrates how the combinations of these two strategies can be used to design competitive circular business models. Key managerial questions are also identified to help decide upon a feasible strategy for circular business model innovation.

Originality/value

While different types of circular business models have been described, it is less clear what the strategic choices are that companies need to make to find feasible business cases for circularity in terms of value proposition, value creation and delivery and value capture. This study outlines these through a “circular business model strategy framework”.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2012

Adli Abouzeedan and Thomas Hedner

The impact of the e-globalization combined with staggering costs for R & D across industries has resulted in the call for new approach to innovation where openness…

Abstract

Purpose

The impact of the e-globalization combined with staggering costs for R & D across industries has resulted in the call for new approach to innovation where openness and interconnectivity is the role. This new approach is designated as “open innovation”. The new paradigm calls for the sharing of knowledge and resources in conducting innovation activities within and among organizations. As such, one needs to re-orient the structure of the organization to meet these new requirements. On the conceptual level, it becomes a significant undertake to try to grasp how our traditional understanding of the organization can be fitted within the requirements of the open innovation when the environment of the e-globalization is taken in consideration. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the question of how organization structure theories can be coupled to the open innovation paradigm. Out of that analysis the authors propose a new theoretical framework of organizational analysis that takes both the classical knowledge and the new economic context of e-globalization.

Design/methodology/approach

The contemporary period is recognized by the term “new economy”, as a replacement for the “old economy”. Another term of importance is “globalization”, which is coupled to the issue of economy categorization. Humanity launched the modern age of globalization some decades ago, but we are going through a new type of globalization, e-globalization. In the e-globalization, processes are induced basically by the impact of the new tools of communication and information technologies. These dynamic processes have forced a re-thinking of the traditional innovation practices. In the paper, the authors reflect on the changes in relation to the traditional knowledge about organization structure, using a deductive approach and textual analysis and relate that to the requirements of an open innovation paradigm. In the process, the authors introduce the basics of the “theory of internetisation dynamics” as a new potential organizational theoretical framework.

Findings

From the analysis, it was found that some traditional concepts about organization structure and organizing mechanism theories are responsive to the needs of the open paradigm settings while other theories are not. However, each of these is able to contribute to one of the five components of the theory of internetisation dynamics.

Originality/value

The authors argue that by using the correct framework for the analysis of the organizational structure, one can propose a set of strategic steps which would help the companies to re-structure. That would save time and effort for policy-makers and managers of firms, as well as researchers active in this field of organization and organizing processes, who are focused on the open innovation transformation requirements of the firms. Running this analysis would add some input into organizational re-orientation in troubled sectors such as in pharmaceutical industries.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Risto Rajala, Mika Westerlund and Kristian Möller

This paper seeks to explore how market orientation facilitates the strategic flexibility of business models grounded in open innovation. The authors suggest that the new…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore how market orientation facilitates the strategic flexibility of business models grounded in open innovation. The authors suggest that the new paradigm of open innovation may impact a firm's adaptability and responsiveness under conditions of environmental flux. However, extending innovation capacity by opening the innovation process poses major challenges for firms. The aims of this study are to explore the characteristics of open innovation activity and to contemplate the role of strategic flexibility in the design of business models based upon open innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws upon a qualitative research approach through a longitudinal case study in the field of open source software (OSS). The empirical case illustrates how an OSS firm utilizes signals in its environment to flexibly alter its business model.

Findings

A business model that embodies open innovation raises dilemmas between open and closed innovation paradigms. However, the authors' case highlights that an ambidextrous approach that combines market orientation with the principles of open innovation increases profitability, shortens time to market through effective market access, and enhances innovation capability.

Research limitations/implications

The results have profound implications for industrial marketers, managers, management consultants and business educators. They can use the insights gleaned from this research to guide the development of business models that involve open innovation. The results indicate that firms involved in open innovation need reactive strategic flexibility to cope with the environmental diversity and variability. However, this study analyzes a single case in the field of OSS and one should be cautious when generalizing the findings.

Originality/value

This paper improves the understanding of the relationship between flexibility and market orientation. It combines two areas that have previously been discussed separately, i.e. market orientation and open innovation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Marcus Holgersson and Ove Granstrand

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate firms’ motives to patent in general, and more specifically how some of these motives depend upon firms’ technology…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate firms’ motives to patent in general, and more specifically how some of these motives depend upon firms’ technology strategies and especially their level of open innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a questionnaire survey sent to chief technology officers (or equivalent) of the largest R&D spenders among Swedish large firms (e.g. ABB, AstraZeneca, Ericsson, and Volvo) and among Swedish small and medium-sized enterprises. Principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions were used to check the impact from open innovation upon the importance of 21 different motives to patent, with a specific focus on protection and bargaining related motives.

Findings

The most important motive to patent is to protect product technologies, but protecting freedom to operate is almost as important, followed by a number of other motives. Increasing importance of open innovation in firms is related to stronger bargaining motives to patent, and even stronger protection motives. In fact, when comparing with closed innovation, the results show that open innovation is more strongly positively related with all different motives to patent except for one (to attract customers). This indicates that firms find it more important to patent when engaged in open innovation than when engaged in closed innovation.

Originality/value

The paper reports results from the first study that links patenting motives to technology strategies. It contributes to an emerging stream of empirical studies investigating the role of patents in external technology strategies and open innovation, showing that the motives to patent are strengthened within open innovation settings.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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