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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Michael B. Duignan

London’s Candidature bid projected an irresistible legacy of lasting benefits for host communities and small businesses. Yet, local post-Games perspectives paint a…

1091

Abstract

Purpose

London’s Candidature bid projected an irresistible legacy of lasting benefits for host communities and small businesses. Yet, local post-Games perspectives paint a contrasted picture – one of becoming displaced. This paper aims to draw on event legacy, specifically in relation to rising rents, threats to small business sustainability and impact on place development by empirically examining London’s local embryonic legacies forming across one ex-hosting Olympic community: Central Greenwich.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 43 interviews with local businesses (specifically, small retailers and hospitality businesses), local authorities, London-centric and national project actors and policymakers underpin analysis, supported by official London 2012 archival, documentary and media reports, were conducted to add texture and triangulate primary and secondary data sources.

Findings

Juxtaposing ex ante projections vs emerging ex post realities, this paper reveals a local legacy of small business failure fuelled by rising commercial rents and a wider indifference for protecting diverse urban high streets. Embroiled in a struggle to survive, and barely recognised as a key stakeholder and contributor to legacy, small businesses have and continue to become succeeded by a new business demographic in town: monochromatic global and national chains. Typifying the pervasive shift toward clone town spaces, this article argues that corporate colonisation displaces independent businesses, serves to homogenise town centres, dilute place-based cultural offer and simultaneously stunts access to a positive local development legacy. This paper argues that such processes lead to the production of urban blandscapes that may hamper destination competitiveness.

Originality/value

Examining event legacy, specifically local legacies forming across ex-host Olympic communities, is a latent, under-researched but vital and critical aspect of scholarship. Most event legacy analysis focuses on longer-term issues for residents, yet little research focuses on both local placed-based development challenges and small business sustainability and survival post-Games. More specifically, little research examines the potential relationship between event-led gentrification, associated rising rents and aforementioned clone town problematic. Revealing and amplifying the idiosyncratic local challenges generated through an in-depth empirically driven triangulation of key local business, policy, governmental and non-governmental perspectives, is a central contribution of this article missing from extant literatures. This paper considers different ways those responsible for event legacy, place managers and developers can combat such aforementioned post-Games challenges.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

John Barry and Stephen Quilley

Abstract

Details

Advances in Ecopolitics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-669-0

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2009

John Barry and Stephen Quilley

The ‘Transition Town’ (TT) movement pioneered by Rob Hopkins initially in Kinsale (Ireland) and Totnes (United Kingdom) has become the fastest growing environmental…

Abstract

The ‘Transition Town’ (TT) movement pioneered by Rob Hopkins initially in Kinsale (Ireland) and Totnes (United Kingdom) has become the fastest growing environmental movement in the global north (Hopkins, 2008). With over 30 official TT initiatives in the United Kingdom, the concept is now spreading into New Zealand, Canada, and many more countries.1 The movement starts from two premises: (i) the reality and implications of rapid and potentially catastrophic climate change; (ii) the reality of ‘peak oil’ – an imminent, permanent short fall in oil supply, increasing year on year with massive geo-political, economic and social consequences.2 Whilst supporting national and multilateral efforts to reduce emissions and to develop new energy technologies and infrastructures, TT leaves climate change protest to environmental campaigning groups, NGOs and activists oriented towards a global civil society. Acknowledging the need for ‘government and business responses [to climate change and peak oil] at all levels’, the role of TT is to ‘create [a] sense of anticipation, elation and a collective call to adventure’ and that this grass-roots bottom-up, local activism could potentially prepare the way for more directly political action at the level of national government (Hopkins, 2008, p. 15).

Details

The Transition to Sustainable Living and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-641-0

Article
Publication date: 20 December 2019

Nicholas Wise

There are many ways of viewing, interpreting and even conceptualizing Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) growth. This paper considers image regeneration…

Abstract

Purpose

There are many ways of viewing, interpreting and even conceptualizing Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) growth. This paper considers image regeneration and how this helps enhance place competitiveness. A focus on events and the spectacle they create also challenges to think about sustainable futures. This paper aims to supplement this focus on image regeneration and competitiveness, it is important to discuss and outline triple bottom line impacts as a framework to consider going forward.

Design/methodology/approach

Looking at the BRICS, the growing events, tourism and leisure industries transcend private and public business practices and can help align with more contemporary sustainable development practices and regeneration agendas. Such agendas can, in turn, help enhance destination competitiveness and image. While the authors need (and should) continue to assess and address economic impacts and development, it is just as important to consider environmental impacts and social impacts on a destination and its residents when considering competitiveness.

Findings

This conceptual paper frames insight from the literature to reflect on and consider research directions linked to triple bottom line impacts. The paper puts emphasis on the need to consider the social and environmental impacts of events.

Originality/value

This paper links conceptual discussions of image regeneration and competitiveness with triple bottom line impacts to look at directions for BRICS nations. It is useful for policymakers and planners who look at the “big picture” of event hosting and argues the need for more sustainable policy and planning agendas.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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