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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Clinton Amos, Jesse King and Skyler King

Past research has demonstrated a health halo for food product labels (e.g. organic), resulting in inflated perceptions of a product’s healthfulness (e.g. low fat). While…

Abstract

Purpose

Past research has demonstrated a health halo for food product labels (e.g. organic), resulting in inflated perceptions of a product’s healthfulness (e.g. low fat). While past studies have focused on labeling and related health claims, the health halo of brand names has scarcely been investigated. This study aims to address this gap by investigating the health halo of brand names featuring morality- and purity-signifiers.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research uses two experiments to examine the health halo of morality- and purity-signifying brand names on perceptions of nutritional and contaminant attributes. Mediation analysis is performed to investigate perceived naturalness as the mechanism for the brand name effects while moderated mediation analysis examines this mechanism across product types (healthy vs unhealthy).

Findings

The findings reveal that both the morality- and purity-signifying brand names produce a health halo on nutritional and contaminant attributes, regardless of product healthiness. Further, mediation and moderated mediation analysis provide evidence for perceived naturalness as the underlying mechanism driving these effects.

Social implications

This research highlights unwarranted consumer inferences made based upon food brand names and, thus has implications for consumers, public policy and marketing managers.

Originality/value

While much health halo research has focused on labeling, this research examines the health halo of two brand name types which symbolically convey either morality or purity. This research provides additional contributions by investigating perceived naturalness as the underlying mechanism for the effects and is one of the few studies to investigate the health halo for both healthy and unhealthy products.

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2019

Clinton Amos, James C. Hansen and Skyler King

This paper aims to investigate inferences consumers make about organic and all-natural labeled products in both food and non-food contexts using the health halo effect as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate inferences consumers make about organic and all-natural labeled products in both food and non-food contexts using the health halo effect as a theoretical foundation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses three experiments to test the effects of organic and all-natural labeling across three product types, food, personal hygiene and household cleaning, while controlling for environmental attitudes.

Findings

The results of the experiments in the context of food, personal hygiene and household cleaning products suggest that both organic and all-natural labeling produce halo effects. Distinct findings are presented across the three product types.

Research limitations/implications

Findings indicate that consumers may make unwarranted inferences about both organic and all-natural labeled products and demonstrates that the health halo effect is a potentially robust phenomenon, pervasive across a diverse array of products. This research used a crowdsourcing platform for sample recruitment. Future research should validate the results of these experiments with other sample types.

Practical implications

This research suggests that consumers may make similar unwarranted inferences for diverse products bearing organic and all-natural labels. These inferences are particularly intriguing given the differing regulatory requirements for the labels

Originality/value

Organic and all-natural labels are ubiquitous in both food and non-food products. However, research on either label primarily exists in a food context and has not directly compared the labels. Understanding the inferences consumers make based on the labels across product types is imperative for both marketing and public policy.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 13 June 2022

Skyler King, Anthony Allred and Clinton Amos

The purpose of this paper is to provide a medium for in-class discussions on trade-offs in investments in different marketing activities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a medium for in-class discussions on trade-offs in investments in different marketing activities.

Research methodology

This case used both secondary and primary sources. An examination of the marketing academic literature on corporate social responsibility and news articles were the main sources of secondary sources. An in-depth interview with Mike Maughan, initiator of the 5 For The Fight campaign and Qualtrics’ Head of Brand Growth and Global Insights provided additional information and support for the case. The interview offered strategic insights from the initiator of 5 For The Fight that were unavailable through secondary sources alone. The interview also detailed insights into the strategic thinking of Qualtrics CEO, Ryan Smith and Jazz President, Steve Starks.

Case overview/synopsis

This case examines Qualtrics, a company that took an unprecedented approach to social responsibility. Qualtrics paid millions of dollars and provided significant promotional and administrative support for cancer research without directly identifying itself as the sponsor on the Utah Jazz National Basketball Association jersey patch.

Complexity academic level

This case is suitable for undergraduate and graduate courses in marketing, management and strategy. This case would also be of interest in a sports marketing course, as it includes an initiative by the National Basketball Association. Moreover, this case will be valuable for courses that include advanced discussions on corporate social responsibility. The case can also provide invaluable insights into innovative strategic planning for marketing and management practitioners. A portion of this case has been tested in a few undergraduate marketing courses.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Anthony Allred, Skyler King and Clinton Amos

VoiceStream was a strong brand within the digital wireless communications industry at the time CEO Robert Dodson led the company. It had a loyal following of customers and…

Abstract

Synopsis

VoiceStream was a strong brand within the digital wireless communications industry at the time CEO Robert Dodson led the company. It had a loyal following of customers and a strong reputation for value. Despite pushback from senior management, CEO Robert Dotson made the decision to undergo a rebranding strategy during a period of declining revenue and growth. As VoiceStream transitioned to T-Mobile, it had initial success, but faced the challenge of how to position the brand long term.

Research methodology

This case study was written with the historical background of a well-known company and traces key decisions made during the company’s rebranding transition. This case comes complete with insights from then current CEO, Robert Dotson.

Relevant courses and levels

This case is suitable for undergraduate and graduate courses in marketing, management or strategy, where students are studying brand management. Additionally, this case will be valuable for courses that include advanced branding strategies such as rebranding. This case could also be used for discussion in positioning and advertising techniques. This case includes, via in-depth interviews, critical strategic insights from CEO Robert Dotson. The case illustrates some of the major opportunities and threats associated with the VoiceStream/T-Mobile rebranding strategy.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Clinton Amos, Sebastian Brockhaus, Amydee M. Fawcett, Stanley E. Fawcett and A. Michael Knemeyer

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate how service perceptions influence customer views of the authenticity of corporate sustainability claims. The goal of this paper is…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate how service perceptions influence customer views of the authenticity of corporate sustainability claims. The goal of this paper is to help supply chain decision-makers better understand boundary conditions in order to design more enduring and impactful sustainability programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ behavioral experiments, subjecting two theoretically derived hypotheses to verification across five diverse industries and two distinct sustainability vignettes.

Findings

Customer service perceptions emerge as a significant boundary condition to the perceived authenticity of sustainability efforts. Subjects attributed significantly higher authenticity toward sustainability efforts in above average vs below average service quality contexts. Further, respondents attributed deceptive motivations to sustainability efforts at companies with below average service.

Research limitations/implications

The authors confirm the underlying tenet of social judgment theory, which suggests that a priori perceptions create a zone of acceptability or rejection. Ultimately, investing in sustainability can lead to counterproductive cynicism.

Practical implications

The authors infer that customers’ willingness to give companies credit for sustainability initiatives extends beyond service issues to any practice that influences a priori perceptions. Supply chain managers must rethink their role in designing both customer service and sustainability systems to achieve positive returns from sustainability investments.

Originality/value

The authors challenge the assumption that customers universally positively view sustainability efforts. If customers hold a priori negative service perceptions, otherwise well-designed sustainability programs may invoke cynical reactions. Thus, sustainability programs may not inoculate firm reputations from adverse incidents. Given they touch both service and sustainability systems, supply chain managers are positioned to holistically influence their design for competitive advantage.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2017

Anthony T. Allred and Clinton Amos

The purpose of this study is to examine the usefulness of disgust imagery in a nonprofit organization context as one part of the broader social marketing paradigm.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the usefulness of disgust imagery in a nonprofit organization context as one part of the broader social marketing paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted in the child victim segment of the market using disgust and nondisgust images. Data were collected from 167 subjects via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Dependent variables measured included donation intention, empathy and guilt. Control variables included religiosity and attitude toward helping others, along with demographic factors.

Findings

MANCOVA results indicate that while the disgust image evoked greater empathy, the nondisgust image evoked greater donation intentions. The disgust image had a nonsignificant effect on the level of guilt felt by subjects. Mediation analysis indicates that empathy serves as a competitive mediator for the disgust–donation intentions relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines the effects of disgust images on empathy, guilt and donation intentions. Although the findings indicate a contrasting effect of disgust on empathy and donation intentions, more research is needed to validate these findings with diverse samples, contexts and various donation behavior measures. Regarding charitable giving, the current findings suggest caution should be used when using disgust images to evoke empathy, as the tactic may also negatively affect donation intentions.

Social implications

Nonprofits that effectively apply marketing can change individual and community behavior. To continue their work, they rely on donors and volunteers. This study provides social marketers.

Originality/value

Past research has demonstrated the effectiveness of disgust appeals for deterring behavior. In contrast, this research provides unique insights into disgust appeals as a catalyst for motivating behavior. This research provides a much-needed empirical evaluation of disgust appeals in a social marketing context.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Iryna Pentina and Clinton Amos

This paper aims to investigate collective identity construction process and applicability of resistance dimensions to the Freegan phenomenon.

3838

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate collective identity construction process and applicability of resistance dimensions to the Freegan phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

Data triangulation approach combines netnography of the Freegan online discourses, and content analysis of mainstream consumer views of Freeganism.

Findings

Participation in shared practices facilitates Freegan collective identity construction through convergence of radical consumer resistance and market‐mediated anti‐consumption.

Research limitations/implications

Multi‐dimensional conceptualization of resistance is applicable to analyzing consumer movements.

Originality/value

Through data triangulation, this research offers an analysis of internally negotiated and externally ascribed Freegan group identities.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Clinton Amos, Iryna Pentina, Timothy G. Hawkins and Natalie Davis

This study aims to investigate the appeal of “natural” labeling and builds on past research which suggests that people may have a naïve pastoral view of nature and natural…

1461

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the appeal of “natural” labeling and builds on past research which suggests that people may have a naïve pastoral view of nature and natural entities. “Natural” labeling is pervasive in supermarkets across the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a multi-method approach to examine consumer perceptions and beliefs about products labeled “natural”. Qualitative responses are solicited to examine the images and feelings that come to mind when consumers see “natural” labeling on a food product. Two experiments are conducted to examine consumers’ evaluations of “natural” labeling on both food and supplement products.

Findings

The results of three studies suggest that “natural” labeling evokes positive feelings and sentimental imagery associated with a pastoral view of nature. These perceptions reinforce beliefs that food and supplement products labeled “natural” possess positive instrumental benefits such as health advantages, lack of contamination and safety.

Social implications

Consumers are under pressure to make better choices regarding what they put into their bodies due to pervasive concern over the prevalence of obesity and diabetes. This study provides insight into why consumers perceive food and supplement products labeled “natural” as better alternatives.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first studies to investigate the underlying perceptual forces accounting for the effectiveness of “natural” food and supplement labeling.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 23 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Francisco Guzman and Cleopatra Veloutsou

499

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Content available
Case study
Publication date: 25 August 2022

Rebecca J. Morris

Abstract

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

1 – 10 of 112