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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Andrew Ebekozien, Clinton Aigbavboa, Solomon Oisasoje Ayo-Odifiri and Nuzaihan Aras Agus Salim

The occurrence of fire accidents in hospital buildings has become a serious challenge and more serious in developing nations. The purpose of this paper intends to assess…

Abstract

Purpose

The occurrence of fire accidents in hospital buildings has become a serious challenge and more serious in developing nations. The purpose of this paper intends to assess fire safety measures in Nigerian hospital facilities. The significance of this study is to ensure that the design and construction of hospital facilities enhance the safety of users and properties.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected via a case study and questionnaire survey and administered to the facility users. The study survey is to assess the respondents' perception of fire safety measures in hospital facilities and suggest possible policy measures that will be employed to enhance safety.

Findings

This paper found that 91% of the respondents have awareness of fire safety measures in hospital facilities. Electrical faults and combustible materials were identified as the frequent causes of fire occurrences in hospital facilities. This can be averted where flammable materials and electrical appliances are correctly installed, and safety rules enforced. Findings show that safety rules are lax in public than standard private hospitals.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to fire safety measures in Nigerian healthcare facilities. Future research is needed to evaluate the level of compliance from design, construction and post-construction of precautionary fire safety measures in hospital facilities in Nigeria.

Practical implications

This paper recommended that designers and hospital administrators should improve on fire safety measures via the development of fire safety management plan and education. Thus, enforcement of fire safety measures in hospital facilities as specified in building codes should be implemented and monitored during and after the design of the hospital buildings. Findings provide valuable lessons on how to improve the fire safety measures in healthcare facilities across the states and other developing countries with similar healthcare situations.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that the stakeholders, especially government agencies concern with approval and enforcement of fire safety measures in healthcare facilities need to reawaken to her responsibility because of the lax implementation across the states.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2020

Titus Ebenezer Kwofie, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa and Wellington Didibhuku Thwala

The South African Construction Industry (SACI) in recent times has been characterized by a strong emphasis towards achieving sustainable building practices in…

Abstract

Purpose

The South African Construction Industry (SACI) in recent times has been characterized by a strong emphasis towards achieving sustainable building practices in infrastructural delivery. However, the lack of progress encountered in making gains in achieving sustainable practices has raised concerns over the effectiveness and understanding of the extent to which life cycle assessment (LCA) techniques may aid in meeting requirements of sustainable construction. Most efforts at LCA have been blighted with numerous barriers that have not been rigorously pursued and aggregated. Ironically, there is a lack of knowledge and understanding of the limitations and barriers to these methodologies, especially in the South African context. The purpose of this study is to delineate the cluster of barriers to the adoption of LCA methodologies in the SACI.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was carried out from a deductive research design elicit primary data based on the experience of purposively sampled stakeholders in LCA in the SACI on the extent they perceived the presence of well-established barriers in LCA adoption culled from the extensive literature review.

Findings

Through the use of factor analysis, three aggregated clusters of key barriers to LCA adoption in the SACI were identified, which were knowledge and enabling conditions constraints, cost and time constraints and technical constraints. The results confirm that indeed human and technical barriers have been notable in limiting gains in LCA adoption and achieving sustainable practices.

Originality/value

These findings are, thus, useful in overcoming challenges to LCA methodologies in achieving sustainable building practices in building and infrastructural delivery in SACI.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Titus Ebenezer Kwofie, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa and Wellington Didibhuku Thwala

In spite of the urge among stakeholders to increase sustainability in the built environment, the South African Construction Industry (SACI) continues to suffer from low…

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the urge among stakeholders to increase sustainability in the built environment, the South African Construction Industry (SACI) continues to suffer from low level of adoption of strategies such as life cycle assessment (LCA) to increase sustainable building practices in building and infrastructure delivery, hence the need to increase the adoption of sustainable concepts and sustainability practices is an emergent necessity. This study aims to identify the measures that can increase the adoption of LCA toward overcoming the practical difficulties, theoretical concerns and structural differences encountered in making gains in achieving sustainable practices in the SA construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a deductive research design using a questionnaire survey with mean scores, Kruskal–Wallis and least square regression analysis done.

Findings

The study determined ten measures that can significantly influence about 88 per cent improvement in the success of LCA adopting in the SA industry. Also, there was a higher level of consensus in the findings which offers credence and good representation of the practical reality in the LCA adoption in South Africa.

Originality/value

These measures could be seen to embrace behavioural, social, technical and policy dimensions of LCA adoption. The findings are thus crucial in overcoming challenges to LCA methodologies in achieving sustainable building practices in the construction process in building and infrastructural delivery in SACI.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Douglas Omoregie Aghimien, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa and Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke

The construction organisations in developing countries are lagging in digital technology usage; hence, they are still characterised by poor project delivery and…

Abstract

Purpose

The construction organisations in developing countries are lagging in digital technology usage; hence, they are still characterised by poor project delivery and technological backwardness. To checkmate this problem, partnering with other organisations was proposed, while critical factors needed for successful digital partnering of construction organisations were assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative research approach. Delphi method was used to get experts' opinion on some identified factors necessary for successful digital partnering. The experts for the study were selected using defined criteria, and a combination of interquartile deviation, Kendall's coefficient of concordance and chi-square was used to achieve robust consensus among respondents. Mann–Whitney U test was also used to ascertain the difference in perception of experts.

Findings

The findings revealed trust in digital partners, top management support and digital partner selection as the three key success factors for partnering. Other factors that can be considered alongside these main factors are the creation of a common goal, a long-term commitment, effective communication, proper conflict resolution and structured as well as continuous digital training, workshops and meetings.

Practical implications

Instead of going through the digitalisation journey alone, construction organisations, particularly in a developing country like South Africa, stand a better chance of surviving the dynamic construction and digital environment by partnering with other organisations within and outside the industry. Carefully selecting the right partner, trusting in their capability and ensuring constant commitment is necessary for the success of the process.

Originality/value

The value of this study lies in its ability to showcase the critical success factors needed for effective digital partnering, an aspect that lacks adequate consideration in the digitalisation of construction industry discourse.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2019

Douglas Omoregie Aghimien, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa and Wellington Didibhuku Thwala

This paper aims to present the result of an assessment of the challenges of sustainable construction (SC) in two developing countries (Nigeria and South Africa). This was…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the result of an assessment of the challenges of sustainable construction (SC) in two developing countries (Nigeria and South Africa). This was done with a view to improving sustainable project delivery, which is a problem among most developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quantitative survey approach with questionnaire used as the instrument for data collection from quantity surveyors, construction and project managers from both countries. Data analysis was done using a four-step analysis approach and relevant descriptive and inferential statistics were adopted.

Findings

The study revealed a considerable level of awareness of SC and involvement in the use of the same among the assessed professionals. Also, it was discovered that SC materials are mostly used in the aspect of surface finishing and masonry construction. Further findings revealed that resistance to change, client’s preference, fear of the increased cost of investment and inadequate knowledge and understanding of the concept of sustainability are some of the major challenges of SC in these countries.

Originality/value

The strength of this study lies in the assessment of happenings from two developing countries and its recommendation can to a large extent promote improved SC in developing countries particularly in Africa were construction activities are similar.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Douglas Omoregie Aghimien, Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke and Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa

The purpose of this paper is to determine the barriers to the adoption of value management (VM) in the construction industry of developing countries with a view to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the barriers to the adoption of value management (VM) in the construction industry of developing countries with a view to providing possible measures in avoiding these barriers and increasing the usage of the system within the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The level of knowledge and adoption of VM practices, as well as the barriers to its adoption in the construction industry were assessed through a survey design. Construction professionals were sampled from the six geo-political zones in Nigeria through the use of a structured questionnaire. Factor analysis was conducted on data gathered on the barriers of VM.

Findings

The study revealed a moderate level of knowledge of VM among construction professionals. This implies that the problem of VM is not that of awareness, but readiness to adopt the system. The study also reveals that the barriers to the adoption of VM can be categorised under the general stakeholder’s barriers, training and education barriers, client barriers and government/top management barriers.

Practical implications

This study was conducted across the six geo-political zones of the country as against common practice of selecting a particular region or states to represent the entire country. The findings therefore show a true reflection of the barriers to VM adoption in the country and its recommendations can to a large extent promote the adoption of VM in the country and also other developing countries where construction projects are executed through similar method, style and approach.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the possible barriers to the adoption of VM in Nigeria construction industry and provides ways to avoiding these barriers in order to achieve better quality construction and value for money.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, David John Edwards, Erika Anneli Pärn, Maxwell Fordjour Antwi-Afari and Clinton Aigbavboa

This research aims to investigate and identify knowledge transfer (KT) enablers within the developing country of Ghana. These enablers act as mechanisms to stimulate…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate and identify knowledge transfer (KT) enablers within the developing country of Ghana. These enablers act as mechanisms to stimulate knowledge creation, knowledge protection and build effective knowledge-sharing (KS) behaviour in construction companies – consequently, they are crucial to business survival in a globally competitive market.

Design/methodology/approach

A perception questionnaire survey was used to elicit responses from construction practitioners using purposive and snowballing non-probability sampling techniques. Summary statistical analysis and a chi-square test was used to uncover relationships between the independent and dependent variables.

Findings

An empirical examination of data collected indicated that knowledge strategy, organizational culture, information technology and knowledge leadership as knowledge enablers have a significant positive relationship with KT. Future research is however required to measure transfer within an organization vis-à-vis measure perception of such.

Originality/value

The work presents a rare glimpse of the relationship between knowledge enablers and KT (particularly in a developing country context) and as such provides utility to policymakers and construction firms to enhance their knowledge capabilities.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Christopher James Roberts, Erika Anneli Pärn, David John Edwards and Clinton Aigbavboa

Advancements in digital technologies have provided significant opportunities to improve the Architecture, Engineering, Construction and Owner-operated (AECO) sector’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Advancements in digital technologies have provided significant opportunities to improve the Architecture, Engineering, Construction and Owner-operated (AECO) sector’s performance through superior data management, streamlined processes and cooperative working practices. However, whilst academic literature widely espouses these benefits during the design and construction phases of development, research suggests that the operational phase of a building’s lifecycle has yet to fully realise performance improvements available through the application of digital modelling technology. The purpose of this paper is to synthesise extant digital modelling, asset management and emergent digital asset management literature, to report upon the beneficial implications of digitalised asset management and identify obstacles hampering its adoption in industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A componential synthesis of future work reported upon in extant literature is organised into thematic categories that indicate potential research avenues and a trajectory for digital asset management research and practice.

Findings

Themes identified include: imprecise Building Information Modelling definitions; isolated software development; data interoperability; intellectual property and virtual property rights; and skills and training requirements. Notably, increased environmental performance also arose as a theme requiring further research but received considerably less academic coverage than the other obstacles identified.

Originality/value

The work presents a comprehensive review of digital technologies utilised within the AECO sector and as such provides utility to researchers, policy makers and practitioners to enhance their knowledge capabilities.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Lee H. Fisher, David John Edwards, Erika Anneli Pärn and Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa

This paper aims to investigate the impact that building design has upon the quality of life for residents of a care home who have dementia. To present a balanced…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact that building design has upon the quality of life for residents of a care home who have dementia. To present a balanced perspective, carers within the care home also participate in the research.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodological approach was adopted using one care home, ten residents and five staff as a sample frame. During interviews conducted, participants were asked semi-structured questions on how building design features impact upon the quality of life of residents. Questions posed focussed upon key design principles that emerged from a detailed review of extant literature.

Findings

Building design for people with dementia must consider a complex array of features to provide a safe and habitable living space for residents and family members who visit. This living space must also be suitably utilitarian and provide a workable environment for staff. Hence, an appropriate balance between these two competing requirements must be attained, and often a tailor-made solution is required that fits the individual’s level of dementia. Three prominent areas that study participants expressed a desire for were a safe environment; support for wayfinding, orientation and navigation; and access to nature and the outdoors.

Originality/value

The work reports upon the rarely discussed issue of building design for people with dementia and could be used by policymakers and construction firms to enhance their knowledge capabilities in this area. The research concludes with direction for future research which should seek to provide more evidence-based research vis-a-vis perception enquiry and extend this seminal work to a larger sample of care homes or people with dementia living at home.

Details

Facilities, vol. 36 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Douglas Aghimien, Clinton Aigbavboa, Lerato Aghimien, Wellington D. Thwala and Lebu Ndlovu

Considering the need for standard and cost-effective housing delivery in South Africa, this study aims to make a case for three-dimensional (3D) printing in housing…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering the need for standard and cost-effective housing delivery in South Africa, this study aims to make a case for three-dimensional (3D) printing in housing delivery through an assessment of the inherent benefits and the factors that could acts as barriers to its adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a survey of construction professionals currently actively involved in a construction project in the country. Analysis of data gathered was done using a four-step analysis approach and relevant descriptive and inferential statistics were adopted.

Findings

The study revealed through factor analysis that 3D printing in housing delivery promises better cost delivery, increased productivity and stakeholder satisfaction, socio-economic benefits, improved quality and faster housing delivery. While these benefits exist, factors such as technical and operational issues of the 3D printing itself, organizational and personnel issues as well as lack of awareness of the inherent benefits and understanding of the technology among stakeholders can prove to be barriers to the adoption of the technology.

Practical implications

In the quest to achieve standard and affordable housing which is part of its National Development Plan 2030, the government can adopt 3D printing which promises significant benefits in terms of cost, time, quality, productivity and stakeholders’ satisfaction. Property developers can also adopt the technology to improve their housing delivery, competitive advantage and the economic value of their properties.

Originality/value

The study contributes significantly to the body of knowledge as it reveals the benefits and barriers of adopting 3D printing in housing delivery in South Africa – an aspect that has not gained significant attention in the fourth industrial revolution and housing delivery discuss in the country.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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