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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Louise M. Wallace, Matthew Boxall and Peter Spurgeon

Clinical governance is an organisational approach to improving the quality of clinical services. A survey was conducted of 33/40 NHS trusts 2.5 to three years after a…

Abstract

Clinical governance is an organisational approach to improving the quality of clinical services. A survey was conducted of 33/40 NHS trusts 2.5 to three years after a baseline survey of the 46 trusts was conducted in the West Midlands region. Reported outcomes were achieved more often than expected at baseline. Patient outcomes and documented changes in clinical behaviour were both expected and reported in over three quarters at both periods. A more open culture was expected in 65 per cent at baseline and achieved in 84 per cent at time 2. Strategies for change continued to rely on both periods in optional, educative, audit and protocol procedures. The new approaches of critical incident review and consultant appraisal were welcomed. External review and league tables had adverse impacts where results were poor, but minimal impact if results were positive. Conclusions are drawn about more effective means of catalysing change.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Jenny Firth‐Cozens

This paper reports on a study to ascertain the development needs in terms of clinical governance of 220 health service staff across all the key professions from primary…

Abstract

This paper reports on a study to ascertain the development needs in terms of clinical governance of 220 health service staff across all the key professions from primary and secondary care, including chief executives and clinical governance leads. Interviews suggested that the development of clinical governance was progressing through the structures created by the leads, and that there was considerable goodwill shown towards it in most of the interviews conducted. Of the participants 69 per cent had heard of clinical governance, though detailed knowledge was rare. The author suggests that development overall needs to be carried out using a multi‐disciplinary and multi‐agency approach where possible, perhaps using pathways of care. It needs also to take account of the expressed fears from medical staff of discussing their care in a multi‐disciplinary setting, and of the two potential conflicting themes that are apparent to chief executives of change towards no‐blame cultures, while encouraging accountability and the recognition of risk.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Rachel Edworthy and Najat Khalifa

The purpose of this paper is to present the arguments for sustaining a clinical database, assess its feasibility in a low-secure service, examine the data that can be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the arguments for sustaining a clinical database, assess its feasibility in a low-secure service, examine the data that can be captured and discuss what this means for practice implications and service development. The paper aims to demonstrate how a clinical database can provide information on three key areas: what patients are like before admission, what is done with them whilst they are in hospital and what happens to them when they are discharged. The paper also aims to examine the practical, legal and ethical implications of building such a database.

Design/methodology/approach

This is conducted in the form of a feasibility study charting the development and implementation of an inpatient clinical database for a low-secure inpatient service.

Findings

The feasibility of creating and maintaining a clinical database in a low-secure service has been assessed and the paper has found that they are an invaluable source of data that all mental health services should strive to develop. They will enable services to track their own outcome measures and tailor their service and interventions according to the needs of service users. However, ethical and legal issues surrounding building clinical databases are complex and require careful consideration.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small-scale study that captured the experience of one service. Ideally this research should be expanded with nationwide clinical database development.

Practical implications

This paper includes implications for the implementation of a clinical database, the resources needed for the running of this and the development of standardised outcome measures for mental health services.

Originality/value

This is potentially an innovative way of developing a clinical database for a low-secure unit and some of the first research into the feasibility of a database for this population. Its practical application is relatively new and potentially innovative in how it is applied.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Maureen A. Flynn, Thora Burgess and Philip Crowley

The purpose of this paper is to present a description of the Irish national clinical governance development initiative and an evaluation of the initiative with the purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a description of the Irish national clinical governance development initiative and an evaluation of the initiative with the purpose of sharing the learning and proposing actions to activate structures and processes for quality and safety. The Quality and Patient Safety Division of the Health Service Executive established the initiative to counterbalance a possible focus on finances during the economic crisis in Ireland and bring attention to the quality of clinical care.

Design/methodology/approach

A clinical governance framework for quality in healthcare in Ireland was developed to clearly articulate the fundamentals of clinical governance. The project plan involved three overlapping phases. The first was designing resources for practice; the second testing the implementation of the national resources in practice; and the third phase focused on gathering feedback and learning.

Findings

Staff responded positively to the clinical governance framework. At a time when there are a lot of demands (measurement and scrutiny) the health services leads and responds well to focused support as they improve the quality and safety of services. Promoting the use of the term “governance for quality and safety” assisted in gaining an understanding of the more traditional term “clinical governance”. The experience and outcome of the initiative informed the identification of 12 key learning points and a series of recommendations

Research limitations/implications

The initial evaluation was conducted at 24 months so at this stage it is not possible to assess the broader impact of the clinical governance framework beyond the action project hospitals.

Practical implications

The single most important obligation for any health system is patient safety and improving the quality of care. The easily accessible, practical resources assisted project teams to lead changes in structures and processes within their services. This paper describes the fundamentals of the clinical governance framework which might serve as a guide for more integrative research endeavours on governance for quality and safety.

Originality/value

Experience was gained in both the development of national guidance and their practical use in targeted action projects activating structures and processes that are a prerequisite to delivering safe quality services.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

David M. Rea

The Resource Management Initiative (RMI) is a central ingredient inplans to instil market‐based relationships in health care and medicine.However, these plans have not…

Abstract

The Resource Management Initiative (RMI) is a central ingredient in plans to instil market‐based relationships in health care and medicine. However, these plans have not benefited from any adequate assessment of “resource management”. Demonstrates how earlier experience with resource management provides little guidance as to how it might be made to work. While resource management implies that measures of cost and activity were to be related to each other, its purposes are confused and confusing. While seemingly offering a variety of advantages, resource management is characterized by struggles and negotiations over its operational substance. Moreover, the initiative failed to resolve crucial issues over how to account for activities. Experience of tackling these issues as market‐based relationships came into effect during 1992‐3 demonstrates that resource management provides limited assistance to managers of the service.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Niamh M. Brennan and Maureen A. Flynn

This paper seeks to review prior definitions of the umbrella term “clinical governance”. The research question is: do clinical governance definitions adequately…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review prior definitions of the umbrella term “clinical governance”. The research question is: do clinical governance definitions adequately distinguish between governance, management and practice functions? Three definitions are introduced to replace that umbrella term.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis is applied to analyse 29 definitions of clinical governance from the perspective of the roles and responsibilities of those charged with governance, management and practice.

Findings

The analysis indicates that definitions of the umbrella term “clinical governance” comprise a mixture of activities relating to governance, management and practice which is confusing for those expected to execute those roles.

Practical implications

Consistent with concepts from corporate governance, the paper distinguishes between governance, management and practice. For effective governance, it is important that there be division of duties between governance roles and management and practice roles. These distinctions will help to clarify roles and responsibilities in the execution of clinical activities.

Originality/value

Drawing on insights from corporate governance, in particular, the importance of a division of functions between governance roles, and management and practice roles, the paper proposes three new definitions to replace the umbrella term “clinical governance”.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Timmy Frawley, Annabel Meehan and Aoife De Brún

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of organisational and structural change on the evolution of quality and safety in health organisations, specifically in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of organisational and structural change on the evolution of quality and safety in health organisations, specifically in mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews. In total, 25 executive management team members in both public and private mental health services were interviewed and data were analysed using Burnard’s framework.

Findings

Three overarching themes emerged: organisational characteristics, leadership and accountability; sustaining collaboration and engagement with stakeholders; and challenges to and facilitators of quality and safety. Taken together, the findings speak to the disruptive and disorienting impact of on-going organisational change and restructuring on leaders’ ability to focus on, and advance, the quality and safety agenda.

Research limitations/implications

Typical with qualitative research of this nature, the potentially limited generalisability of the findings must be acknowledged.

Practical implications

There is a need for strategies to implement change that are informed by evidence and theory and informed by decades of research on this topic, rather than introduced ad hoc. Change agents must pair effective change management and implementation science strategies to specific contexts, depending on what is being implemented and ensure appropriate evaluation of organisational change to bolster the evidence base around quality and safety and inform future decision-making.

Originality/value

The study explores an identified gap in the literature on the impact of on-going organisational re-structuring and transformation on the evolution of quality and safety in mental health services.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Daryl Mahon

Organisations are increasingly understanding the need to be trauma informed. However, how trauma therapies in such organisations apply the principles of choice and…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations are increasingly understanding the need to be trauma informed. However, how trauma therapies in such organisations apply the principles of choice and collaboration is less understood. The present paper applies two trans-theoretical methods for involving clients in their therapy through preference accommodation and feedback-informed treatment (FIT). A case vignette is provided demonstrating how to involve clients in trauma therapy by listening to their preferences, needs and by providing them with a voice on their experience of the process and outcome of care.

Design/methodology/approach

A focused review of the literature was conducted, with relevant randomised control trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses sourced. The resulting information informed the design and this model for working with those in trauma therapy.

Findings

The research regarding trauma-specific therapies being more effective is far from conclusive. At the same time, early attrition and negative outcomes make up a large percentage of those seeking therapy. Using preference accommodation and FIT is one possibly way to mitigate against these experiences in therapy and to provide choice, preference and collaboration consisting with the principles of trauma-informed approaches.

Research limitations/implications

Methods to improve the experiences of those seeking trauma therapy have been identified and discussed. According to the author’s knowledge, this is the first known paper aligning trauma therapy and trauma-informed approaches with preference accommodation and FIT. Future empirical studies may wish to examine the relative effectiveness of this approach.

Practical implications

Methods to improve outcomes for those seeking trauma therapy are at the disposal of practitioners. Improving outcomes, while also providing choice, voice and collaboration is a clinical setting.

Originality/value

This is a novel paper adding to value and extending how practitioners can use principles of trauma-informed approaches within trauma therapy.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2019

Alesia Moulton-Perkins, Alexandra Wressle, Nick Grey and Rebecca Sired

Applications for clinical psychology training far outstrip places and relevant work experience is key. Paid opportunities are limited and therefore many choose…

Abstract

Purpose

Applications for clinical psychology training far outstrip places and relevant work experience is key. Paid opportunities are limited and therefore many choose volunteering, with well-connected graduates faring best. To promote equal opportunities a coordinated psychology graduate voluntary internship programme was established in a National Health Service Trust in the South of England. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate intern and supervisor outcomes, equality of access and adherence to governance standards.

Design/methodology/approach

Three cohorts of interns, unappointed applicants and supervisors were surveyed. Between 2013 and 2016, 270 psychology graduates applied, 119 were recruited and 151 either refused a place or were unsuccessful. In total, 91 supervisors provided service-level feedback.

Findings

Interns and applicants were predominantly young, able-bodied white British heterosexual females. Demographic profiles were similar and broadly representative of psychology graduates nationally. While fewer were from Black and Ethnic Minority backgrounds, proportions were greater than the local population. Participants were more socioeconomically privileged than undergraduates nationally. The scheme was popular and well governed according to interns and supervisors. Post-internship employment prospects were improved, with most interns gaining paid mental health roles like assistant psychologist. Most supervisors commented on the positive contribution made by interns to service outcomes.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant contribution to the literature on voluntary psychology graduate posts, an area under-researched until now. Our results suggest that a coordinated, transparent approach can benefit both interns and services by minimising exploitation and maximising developmental opportunities for the new graduate. The programme makes an important contribution to addressing inequalities experienced by psychology graduates attempting to enter mental health careers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Sixtus Dane Ramos

The therapeutic community (TC) is a widely used intervention program in treating substance use disorders. Despite its documented utility, researchers and practitioners are…

Abstract

Purpose

The therapeutic community (TC) is a widely used intervention program in treating substance use disorders. Despite its documented utility, researchers and practitioners are still perplexed on how it exactly works. The purpose of this paper is to suggest the role of attachment styles and treatment motivation in the TC process.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying an explanatory correlational research, this notion was tested by examining the responses of 200 patients with substance use disorder in a TC using mediation analysis.

Findings

The results revealed that attachment styles indirectly affect client’s clinical progress by the path of treatment motivation. Although the current study cannot conclude causality, the results provide empirical evidence suggesting that attachment activates motivation in treatment within the social dynamics of the TC, thus influencing clinical progress.

Originality/value

From these findings, recommendations for the modification of TCs along with considerations for further research, and socio-political implications are discussed.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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