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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Christopher E. Clark and Lindsey F.P. Smith

This qualitative study examined the views of clinical governance leads in South West England on the development of clinical governance, and its relationship to education

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1157

Abstract

This qualitative study examined the views of clinical governance leads in South West England on the development of clinical governance, and its relationship to education in primary care. Information was obtained from semi‐structured interviews with clinical governance leads, and supplementary methods were used to confirm key findings. Four principal themes emerged: education, support, barriers, and evolution. Education is central to achieving the clinical governance agenda. There is a range of educational needs within primary care and these must be integrated into practice professional development plans, which will be shaped by national and local priorities. A need for PCG clinical governance tutors to support this process emerged. A range of supporting mechanisms was identified, as were barriers: principally inadequate resources and a rigid agenda imposed from above. Existing educationalists will need to change their role within the new structures, and this should be an evolutionary rather than a revolutionary process.

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British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Ann-Charlotte Bivall, Maria Gustavsson and Annika Lindh Falk

Clinical placement is an important formalised student activity for linking healthcare education and healthcare practices. The purpose of this study is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical placement is an important formalised student activity for linking healthcare education and healthcare practices. The purpose of this study is to investigate the organising of clinical placements by examining conditions for collaboration between higher education and healthcare organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on interviews with central actors at a university and two healthcare organisations with official duties of organising clinical placements.

Findings

The findings indicate that collaboration in the organising of clinical placements is a complex matter of interconnected actors in different organisational positions, at both strategic and operative levels. The university and the healthcare organisations approached the clinical placement with a shared commitment.

Practical implications

The findings provide important guidance for improving collaboration in the organising of clinical placements. This may have an impact on how contextual conditions of the educational framing and daily healthcare practices are viewed and how the interdependency between the long-term strategic issues and the short-term needs of healthcare organisations is approached.

Originality/value

This research emphasises the need for careful consideration of the collaborative practices on an organisational level between higher education and healthcare organisations as different needs, motives and logics have to be considered.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2016

Gemma Smyth

The initial purpose of this study was to examine the educational needs and perceptions of students and clinicians in Canadian legal clinics.

Abstract

Purpose

The initial purpose of this study was to examine the educational needs and perceptions of students and clinicians in Canadian legal clinics.

Methodology/approach

The author conducted a literature review of leading educational materials in Canada and the United States focusing on required or preferred competencies for law students. The author then interviewed law students, clinicians, social workers, and community legal workers from across Ontario, Canada, all of whom were working or studying at law school-affiliated legal clinics. Interview subjects were asked a series of questions about their learning experiences in hopes of informing the creation of clinical teaching and learning materials.

Findings

The data revealed an under-reliance of the affective elements of teaching, learning, and practice in both existing literature and current teaching practices. The data also revealed deep structural divides between doctrinal and clinical teaching and learning approaches.

Originality/value

Without further integration between these two approaches, students and, ultimately, communities and clients will not reap the benefits possible from an integrated curriculum.

Details

Integrating Curricular and Co-Curricular Endeavors to Enhance Student Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-063-3

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Katri Manninen, Elisabet Welin Henriksson, Max Scheja and Charlotte Silén

This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students’ experiences of learning at a clinical education ward.

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1567

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students’ experiences of learning at a clinical education ward.

Design/methodology/approach

The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students’ encounters with patients, supervisors, students and other health care professionals. A total of 19 students were interviewed. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis investigating both the manifest and the latent content.

Findings

The most important components in students’ learning are mutual relationships and a sense of belongingness. A mutual relationship between the students and the patients is created and becomes the basis of students’ learning. Belongingness means the students’ experience of being for real a part of the team taking care of the patients.

Research limitations/implications

The study, while linked to a particular teaching hospital, offers insights of more general nature by linking the findings to a theory of transformative learning.

Originality/value

This study adds a deeper understanding of students’ perspectives of significant characteristics to take into account when organizing clinical practice in health care education. Being entrusted and supported by a team of supervisors to take care of patients at a clinical education ward early in the education program provides an experience of internal and external authenticity. The students learn from, with and through the patients, which contributes to meaningful learning, understanding nursing, and professional development.

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Michelle Veyvoda, Thomas J. Van Cleave and Laurette Olson

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged…

Abstract

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged teaching and learning can prepare students to become ethical healthcare practitioners. The authors infuse examples from their own courses throughout the chapter, mostly from the clinical fields of speech-language pathology, audiology, and occupational therapy. However, the chapter is applicable and generalizable to faculty from a wide scope of allied health training programs. The chapter introduces considerations for establishing campus–community partnerships in an ethical manner, as well as ways to foster student self-reflection and critical thinking through an ethical lens. Principles from the codes of ethics of various allied health professions are incorporated throughout the chapter along with examples of how each can be applied in community-based clinical experiences. Through a review of relevant literature, analysis of professional codes of ethics, case-based examples, and a step-by-step guide to course development, this chapter provides readers with a mechanism to ground their courses in professional ethics in a way that is relatable and relevant to students.

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

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Book part
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Irene Antonopoulos and Omar Madhloom

The global Clinical Legal Education (CLE) movement transcends borders as law teachers worldwide try to inculcate law students and future legal practitioners with social…

Abstract

The global Clinical Legal Education (CLE) movement transcends borders as law teachers worldwide try to inculcate law students and future legal practitioners with social justice values. One method of achieving this is through developing reflective practitioners. Kolb, finding common ground in the work of Lewin, Dewey, and Piaget, formulated the four stages in the experiential development of concrete experience, reflective observation, abstract conceptualization, and active experiment. Although Kolb’s model is used in legal education literature, students may not be provided with the relevant conceptual tools required to engage in reflective practice. This often results in students providing subjective analysis of their work, which fails to fully contribute to their educational experience. One of the reasons for omitting analytical tools is that reflective practice suffers from a lack of conceptual clarity. According to Kinsella, the “concept remains elusive, is open to multiple interpretations, and is applied in a myriad of ways in educational and practice environments”. A further issue hindering reflective practice relates to Donald Schön’s critique of the positivist approach adopted by law schools.

This chapter will apply a human rights framework to CLE to develop reflective practitioners. The two main reasons for this are, first, human rights as formulated by the Universal Declaration on Human Rights are universal, interrelated, and indivisible and, second, reflection based on these universal human rights values will benefit cross-jurisdictional societies in assisting vulnerable clients affected by emerging implied and direct human rights challenges.

Details

International Perspectives in Social Justice Programs at the Institutional and Community Levels
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-489-9

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Mark Hecimovich and Simone Volet

The purpose of this paper is to review critically the published research investigating how guided practice into the profession contributes to increased professional…

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2423

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review critically the published research investigating how guided practice into the profession contributes to increased professional confidence in health care students, with a view to identifying its impact on the development of professional confidence.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature search was performed using MEDLINE and ERIC (1980‐2009), which identified guided practice into the profession as being the most commonly examined educational opportunity increasing professional confidence. Empirical studies that had rigorous research design and methods were selected for in‐depth review. However, in light of the paucity of the extant research, a few studies reporting anecdotal accounts of the development of professional confidence through guided practice were also included.

Findings

The review revealed how guided practice into the profession can contribute significantly to students' development of professional confidence. The review also points to arguable relationships between confidence and competence and the importance of better understanding and addressing the issue of under‐ and over‐confidence. The review highlights when evidence of the effectiveness of learning opportunities was insufficient or unreliable, with some directions for future research.

Research limitations/implications

The review was based on a selection of papers most representative of research examining the effectiveness of guided professional practice learning opportunities to promote the development of professional confidence, and therefore is not a systematic review of all the extant literature.

Originality/value

It provides insight into the conditions under which guided practice into the profession can contribute to enhancing professional confidence, which is important, given the nature of its relationship with professional competence.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2018

Chin-Yuan Lai and Yung-Chin Yen

This paper aims to illustrate how mobile devices could be applied to substantiate cognitive apprenticeship model to optimize nursing students’ learning experiences in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate how mobile devices could be applied to substantiate cognitive apprenticeship model to optimize nursing students’ learning experiences in clinical settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight female students from a nursing college in Taiwan were recruited in this study. They enrolled in a three-week nursing clinical practicum session in the area of psychiatric nursing.

Findings

Analysis of interview data from students and instructor showed that use of the mobile technology could promote the effectiveness of cognitive apprenticeship model, especially for processes of reflection, coaching, scaffolding and articulation.

Originality/value

The present study intended to bridge the gap between mobile technologies and cognitive apprenticeship. This study explores students’ experiences and expectations of using mobile technology in clinical nursing courses and clarifies how the cognitive apprenticeship model fits students’ experiences during using mobile technology in the clinical nursing course.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Jane Currie, Jane Mateer, Damien Weston, Elizabeth Anderson and Jackson Harding

In 2012, Headquarters 17 Combat Service Support Brigade (HQ 17 CSS Bde) implemented a clinical governance framework. The framework is intended as a quality improvement…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2012, Headquarters 17 Combat Service Support Brigade (HQ 17 CSS Bde) implemented a clinical governance framework. The framework is intended as a quality improvement tool through which excellence in deployed healthcare is achieved. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of this clinical governance framework to 17 CSS Bde and present feedback provided by users on their application of the clinical governance framework.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic survey was disseminated to the four 17 CSS Bde deployable health battalions (n=1,061). Qualitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data using thematic analysis.

Findings

In total, there were 105 responses providing valid data for analysis. The data identified mixed understanding and awareness of clinical governance amongst participants, and pinpointed aspects of the framework that needed refinement.

Practical implications

The results highlight important challenges implementing a clinical governance framework for deployable health units. The authors propose embedding clinical governance education in all army soldier and officer health courses to remedy deficits in knowledge and understanding. Recommendations for further development of the clinical governance framework are also made with particular emphasis on education, clinical risk and clinical evaluation.

Originality/value

This paper offers unique insight into the implementation of a clinical governance framework to the 17 CSS Bde, Australian Army. The results suggest that levels of understanding and awareness of clinical governance are stalling its translation through the military hierarchy. The data identify that implementation of a clinical governance framework is not easy, even within a military environment where the culture is to follow orders and obey the chain of command.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2019

Luming Li, Nikhil Gupta and Tobias Wasser

Mental health providers will be increasingly called on to lead psychiatric efforts to improve care and care redesign. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health providers will be increasingly called on to lead psychiatric efforts to improve care and care redesign. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in the USA requires residency programs to teach quality improvement (QI) and systems-based practice (SBP) to all trainees as part of training requirements. However, teaching QI and SBP concepts without a clinical context can be challenging with low trainee engagement. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors describe curricular redesign with a specialized educator faculty task force that aimed to create a longitudinal curriculum that integrated abstract QI concepts into clinical practice settings, and helped trainees apply SBP concepts throughout residency. In addition, the authors describe the utilization of resident prescriber profiles to contextualize clinical practice habits, and the implementation of an educational case conference series with emphasis on QI-specific educational tools such as root cause analysis (RCA).

Findings

Formal resident feedback from 2016 to 2018 has demonstrated improved trainee satisfaction. The resulting curricular change has also led to a new chief resident role and sustained engagement in QI and SBP education by trainees.

Research limitations/implications

The faculty task force and curricular design changes described in this paper were implemented at one large academic institution. Thus, additional assessment and research is necessary to address the generalizability of the interventions described.

Originality/value

Since QI and SBP are becoming more prominent requirements for medical education accrediting bodies such as the ACGME, the innovative curricular design can benefit other residency and medical student education programs that attempt to integrate clinical practice with education incorporating QI and SBP concepts.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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