Search results

1 – 10 of over 46000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 July 2018

Mohammad Tanvi Newaz, Peter Rex Davis, Marcus Jefferies and Manikam Pillay

Safety climate and its impact on safety performance is well established; however, researchers in this field suggest that the absence of a common assessment framework is a…

Abstract

Purpose

Safety climate and its impact on safety performance is well established; however, researchers in this field suggest that the absence of a common assessment framework is a reflection of the state of development of this concept. The purpose of this paper is to propose a five-factor model that can be used to diagnose and measure safety climate in construction safety research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was adopted, and following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, 574 articles were selected at the start of the study based on a developed review protocol for investigating safety climate factors. While examining the factor analysis of different studies, data reliability and data validity of the individual research findings were considered and frequency of factors uploaded was used to determine the significance as a quantitative measure to develop the ranking of safety climate factors.

Findings

The review identified that, from the established measures of safety climate in construction, there is little uniformity on factor importance. However, management commitment safety system role of the supervisor; workers’ involvement and group safety climate were found to be the most common across the studies reviewed. It is proposed these factors are used to inform a five-factor model for investigating safety climate in the construction industry.

Originality/value

The findings of this study will motivate researchers and practitioners in safety to use the five-factor safety climate model presented in this paper and test it to develop a common factor structure for the construction industry. The fact that the model is comprised of five factors makes it easier to be used and implemented by small-to medium-sized construction companies, therefore enhancing its potential use.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Meriam Ismail

The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of two independent variables, creative climate and learning organization, on innovation separately and simultaneously.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of two independent variables, creative climate and learning organization, on innovation separately and simultaneously.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used was multiple regression analysis executed on the data collected. Apart from that, the study also used T‐tests to compare the means of variables between the randomly selected local organization and MNCs. ANOVA was also conducted to compare the means of the variables between three different employee categories of job levels, namely the top, middle/lower management and supporting staff.

Findings

The results indicated that both learning culture and creative climate contributed 58.5 percent to the explanation of the observed variances in the innovation construct. The learning organization culture separately was found to have a significantly stronger relationship with innovation (r=0.733) than did the organizational creative climate (r=0.473). This implied a larger contribution from the learning organization variable towards innovation. The findings also showed that there were no significant differences in the mean scores (P>0.05) among the three organizational job levels included, namely the top management, middle/lower management and staff, in the members' perceptions of innovation, creative climate and learning culture. The study also found no significant differences in the mean scores (P>0.05) among the small, medium, large and very large organizational population sizes in the members' perceptions on innovation, creative climate and learning culture.

Originality/value

The study involved a sample of 18 private organizations selected at random from a list of 165 organizations across various core businesses. The instrument used for innovation is developed by the researcher, validated by post hoc factor analysis involving 259 respondents.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Stephanie A. Andel, Derek M. Hutchinson and Paul E. Spector

The modern workplace contains many physical and interpersonal hazards to employee physical and psychological health/well-being. This chapter integrates the literatures on…

Abstract

The modern workplace contains many physical and interpersonal hazards to employee physical and psychological health/well-being. This chapter integrates the literatures on occupational safety (i.e., accidents and injuries) and mistreatment (physical violence and psychological abuse). A model is provided linking environmental (climate and leadership), individual differences (demographics and personality), motivation, behavior, and outcomes. It notes that some of the same variables have been linked to both safety and mistreatment, such as safety climate, mistreatment climate, conscientiousness, and emotional stability.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Wayne K. Hoy, James Hoffman, Dennis Sabo and James Bliss

Middle schools are becoming increasingly more pervasive ‐ all but replacing traditional junior high schools. Because they are neither elementary nor high schools, the…

Abstract

Middle schools are becoming increasingly more pervasive ‐ all but replacing traditional junior high schools. Because they are neither elementary nor high schools, the organizational climates of middle schools are unlikely to be adequately tapped by standard measures designed for other structures. Conceptualizes and develops a measure of the organizational climate of middle schools, generates a typology of school climates based on openness, and tests the relationship between climate and authenticity in teacher and principal behaviour. Finds that openness in the school climate is directly related to authenticity in both.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Indrani R. Halady and Purba H. Rao

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether awareness to climate change and its adverse impacts have any significant linkages to behavioral changes amongst…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether awareness to climate change and its adverse impacts have any significant linkages to behavioral changes amongst individual managers who undertake initiatives to minimize/mitigate the impacts.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework based on different aspects of awareness possibly leading to behavior change has been proposed. Subsequently, the results from an empirical research based on a survey questionnaire as research instrument, are analyzed using exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to validate the framework and the research question.

Findings

Awareness to the climate change phenomenon does lead to significant behavioral change amongst managers in the industry, alleviating the potential and existing threats of climate change phenomenon. In particular, the awareness to health impacts of climate change has significantly impacted individuals taking up the cause to lead climate change campaigns to counter its onslaught.

Research limitations/implications

The research is conducted in a population confined to a single region in India. Its scope needs to be broadened to encompass the entire country.

Originality/value

The findings should lead to widespread awareness campaigns emphasizing on awareness to adverse health disorders as a direct result of climate change and its other adverse impacts, and also the individual initiatives that can be taken up as well as what the industry can do.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Gro Ellen Mathisen, Torvald Øgaard and Ståle Einarsen

The purpose of this paper is to simultaneously examine individual‐ and team‐level predictors of workplace victimization by applying two‐level modeling. Previous workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to simultaneously examine individual‐ and team‐level predictors of workplace victimization by applying two‐level modeling. Previous workplace victimization research has primarily been conducted on the individual level of analysis, which may be insufficient when assessing organizational‐ and team‐level predictors of workplace victimization. The authors examined the relationships between target personality (Big Five personality factors), perceived stressors, work climate, and perceived workplace victimization.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted in organizations within the restaurant sector; the data were obtained using questionnaires completed by employees and supervisors (n=207) in 70 restaurants.

Findings

A model that included all variables fitted the data well. However, individual‐level perceived stressors was the only variable that was significantly related to workplace victimization. The facts that our model included team‐level climate factors and individual‐level personality traits, and both individual‐ and team‐level victimization showed good fit to the data, with only one specific variable in the model showing any significant relationship with bullying, may indicate that bullying is more a consequence of the total risk factors than related to specific factors, on an individual or team level. Hence, it is the additive effect of the factors that matters more than each individual factor.

Practical implications

Of practical relevance is that the paper provides evidence that both individual and team‐level factors are related to workplace victimization, indicating that bullying cannot be prevented by focusing on clearly defined risk factors either on team or individual levels. As a manager, one must work on all aspects of the social working environment, including the total vulnerability of one's employees and their respective levels of work stress.

Originality/value

From a methodological viewpoint, the paper demonstrates that an analysis of clustered individual‐level data, without the application of proper multilevel analysis, may lead to biased results.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Mohamed Alblooshi and Mohammad Shamsuzzaman

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the intangible impacts of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) and organisational innovation climate factors and proposes a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the intangible impacts of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) and organisational innovation climate factors and proposes a conceptual model to link them. This paper ultimately aims to extend the range of LSS application by proposing LSS as a tool for fostering organisational innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper followed a qualitative research approach to identify, analyse and categorize the intangible impacts of LSS by reviewing previous literature on its application and conducting in-depth interviews with its experts. Then, a detailed description of organisational innovation climate was provided to highlight its main factors. Finally, a conceptual model was developed to illustrate the relationships among the collected information.

Findings

LSS was found to have many intangible impacts categorized as organisational or individual related. Organisational innovation climate is determined by a number of factors that were found to be positively influenced by many of LSS's intangible impacts. Thus, a number of propositions between LSS's intangible impacts and organisational innovation climate factors were proposed, as illustrated by a conceptual model.

Originality/value

Studying the relationship between LSS and innovation by considering LSS's intangible impacts and linking them to organisational innovation climate factors is a relatively new approach that makes the contribution of this research valuable and significant to academics and professionals.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Todd D. Smith and David M. DeJoy

The purpose of this paper is to test an initial model of safety climate for firefighting. Relationships between safety climate, safety behaviors and firefighter injuries…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test an initial model of safety climate for firefighting. Relationships between safety climate, safety behaviors and firefighter injuries were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 398 professional firefighters in the southeastern USA. Structural equation modeling, using a zero-inflated Poisson regression method, was used to complete the analyses.

Findings

Safety climate, as a higher order factor, was comprised of four factors including management commitment to safety, supervisor support for safety, safety programs/policies and safety communication. Both safety compliance behaviors and safety participation behaviors were significantly, positively associated with safety climate. Both behaviors were deemed protective and were associated with reductions in injury. Safety climate relations to injury were interesting, but somewhat ambiguous. Safety climate significantly predicted membership in the “always zero” injury group. For those not in the “always zero” group, the relationship between safety climate and injury was positive, which was not completely surprising as direct relationships between safety climate and injury have been insignificant and opposite to predictions in studies using retrospective data and may be attributed to reverse causation.

Originality/value

This novel study illustrates the importance of both organizational and work unit factors in helping shape safety climate perceptions among firefighters. The results also support the safety climate – behavior – injury model and show that a positive safety climate encourages safer behaviors among firefighters. Lastly, the findings confirm that both safety compliance behaviors and safety participation behaviors are important to reducing individual firefighter injury experience.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Abubakr Suliman and Bader Al Harethi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential relationships between perceived work climate and work performance in security organizations. Furthermore, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential relationships between perceived work climate and work performance in security organizations. Furthermore, the relationship of various factors related to work climate and work performance are studied and investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected from a public security organization in the UAE. Using a self‐managed questionnaire, a sample of 500 full‐time employees was surveyed – randomly selected from top, middle and lower level of management.

Findings

The results show that organizational climate and its components significantly predict work performance and its factors.

Practical implications

The theoretical and managerial implications of the findings are discussed in the paper, together with some recommendations for managing work climate and performance in security organizations.

Originality/value

The paper examines the links between climate and performance for the first time in public security organizations in the UAE and the Arabic context.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Andreas Matzarakis

Climate change will affect tourism at several temporal and spatial levels. This chapter focuses on the quantification of effects and the development of strategies to…

Abstract

Climate change will affect tourism at several temporal and spatial levels. This chapter focuses on the quantification of effects and the development of strategies to reduce extremes and frequencies as well as thresholds in tourism areas. Knowledge about possibilities for mitigation and adaptation of current and expected climate conditions requires interdisciplinary approaches and solutions. Several examples are presented, including the effects of trees against climate change and extreme events (heat waves), behavior adaptations, urban and regional planning measures, bioclimatic conditions in the Mediterranean and human–biometeorological conditions under climate change conditions, and user-friendly computer tools for the quantification of urban bioclimate conditions.

Details

Tourism and the Implications of Climate Change: Issues and Actions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-620-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 46000