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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Delphine Gibassier, Giovanna Michelon and Mélodie Cartel

The purpose of this paper is to review the contributions of the special issue papers while presenting four broad research avenues.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the contributions of the special issue papers while presenting four broad research avenues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a review of current literature on climate change and carbon accounting.

Findings

The authors propose four broad avenues for research: climate change as a systemic and social issue, the multi-layered transition apparatus for climate change, climate vulnerability and the future of carbon accounting.

Practical implications

The authors connect this study with the requested institutional changes for climate breakdown, making the paper relevant for practice and policy. The authors notably point to education and professions as institutions that will request bold and urgent makeovers.

Social implications

The authors urge academics to reconsider climate change as a social issue, requiring to use new theoretical lenses such as emotions, eco-feminism, material politics and “dispositifs” to tackle this grand challenge.

Originality/value

This paper switches the authors’ viewpoint on carbon accounting to look at it from a more systemic and social lens.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2018

Ksenia Chmutina, Peter Fussey, Andrew Dainty and Lee Bosher

A number of severe weather events have influenced a shift in UK policy concerning how climate-induced hazards are managed. Whist this shift has encouraged improvements in…

Abstract

Purpose

A number of severe weather events have influenced a shift in UK policy concerning how climate-induced hazards are managed. Whist this shift has encouraged improvements in emergency management and preparedness, the risk of climate change is increasingly becoming securitised within policy discourses, and enmeshed with broader agendas traditionally associated with human-induced threats. Climate change is seen as a security risk because it can impede development of a nation. The purpose of this paper is to explore the evolution of the securitisation of climate change, and interrogates how such framings influence a range of conceptual and policy focused approaches towards both security and climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon the UK context, the paper uses a novel methodological approach combining critical discourse analysis and focus groups with security experts and policymakers.

Findings

The resulting policy landscape appears inexorably skewed towards short-term decision cycles that do little to mitigate longer-term threats to the nation’s assets. Whilst a prominent political action on a global level is required in order to mitigate the root causes (i.e. GHG emissions), national level efforts focus on adaptation (preparedness to the impacts of climate-induced hazards), and are forming part of the security agenda.

Originality/value

These issues are not restricted to the UK: understanding the role of security and its relationship to climate change becomes more pressing and urgent, as it informs the consequences of securitising climate change risks for development-disaster risk system.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Bruno Locatelli, Giacomo Fedele, Virginie Fayolle and Alastair Baglee

As adaptation and mitigation are separated in international and national policies, there is also a division in the financial resources mobilized by the international…

Abstract

Purpose

As adaptation and mitigation are separated in international and national policies, there is also a division in the financial resources mobilized by the international community to help developing countries deal with climate change. Given that mitigation activities can benefit or hinder adaptation, and vice versa, promoting activities that contribute to both objectives can increase the efficiency of fund allocation and minimize trade-offs, particularly in land-related activities such as agriculture and forestry. The purpose of this study is to analyze how climate funding organizations consider the integration of adaptation and mitigation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed representatives of climate funds directed toward forestry and agriculture to gain a better understanding of how they perceive the benefits, risks and barriers of an integrated approach; whether they have concrete activities for promoting this approach; and how they foresee the future of adaptation–mitigation integration.

Findings

Interviews revealed a diverse range of perceived benefits, risks and barriers at local, national and global scales. Most interviewees focused on the local benefits of this integration (e.g. increasing the resilience of forest carbon projects), whereas others emphasized global risks (e.g. decreasing global funding efficiency because of project complexity). Despite the general interest in projects and policies integrating adaptation and mitigation, few relevant actions have been implemented by organizations engaged in climate change finance.

Originality/value

This paper provides new insight into how the representatives of climate funds perceive and act on the integration of adaptation and mitigation in forestry and agriculture. The findings by the authors can inform the development of procedures for climate change finance, such as the Green Climate Fund. While managers of climate funds face barriers in promoting an integrated approach to adaptation and mitigation, they also have the capacity and the ambition to overcome them.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Josep‐Francesc Valls and Rafael Sardá

The purpose of this paper is to analyse perceptions among European tourism experts specialising in tourism planning regarding the impact that climate change may have on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse perceptions among European tourism experts specialising in tourism planning regarding the impact that climate change may have on tourism management.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used was the double convergent Delphi Method. A total of 70 European experts in tourism planning were surveyed to determine their opinions. Two focus groups of experts were organised, first to fine‐tune the questionnaire before implementing the Delphi method and, second, to check the results afterwards.

Findings

The most noteworthy findings expressed were: climate change has already begun; life in the forthcoming decades will be subject to constant uncertainty; there is a clear perception of responsibility; there is a reluctance to accept repressive taxation but support for renewable energy incentives; and there is a call for responsible growth based on integrated destination management, public‐private co‐responsibility and the application of mitigation/adaptation measures. Additionally, climate change is already threatening tourist enterprises, and an efficient integrated management system in companies and tourist destinations will be required to cope with its negative effects.

Research limitations/implications

The limits of this research are those inherent in the Delphi method itself, which is highly opinion‐based. To reduce this, the sample was broadened to include 70 interviewees instead of the 30 traditionally used.

Practical implications

The practical implications lie in offering an exploratory vision of climate change from experts' perception; their outlook considerably broadens the field of reflection.

Originality/value

Additionally, the value of the paper is to allow discussion on the perception of experts in tourism planning regarding climate change in the Euro‐Mediterranean region.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 64 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Anne Touboulic and Lucy McCarthy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the current focus of supply chain management (SCM) research; it considers field level and societal constraints and consequently the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the current focus of supply chain management (SCM) research; it considers field level and societal constraints and consequently the potential for change. It details the underlying assumptions in the field, considering the dominant paradigms and stakeholders, and how this has shaped the research we have engaged in as a community of scholars.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a reflective inquiry that seeks to deconstruct the dominant discourses and paradigms in SCM. It offers alternative avenues of inquiry to “traditional” research, considering how different questions, perspectives and approaches might yield different learning for the field. offering alternative avenues to traditional research.

Findings

This is a call for collective action, for solidarity, for a re-imagining of what research in SCM could look like. Research activism is challenging and potentially risky but necessary for the research community to engage in, particularly in light of the global societal grand challenges. Change can take place in the SCM field through collective action and solidarity. Three levels of activism are explored here – acting to solve the grand challenges, acting to change the field and acting as individuals.

Originality/value

This is a “speak-out” piece, which embraces and encourages reflexivity, new methods of doing and writing research as well as different perspectives, and especially a consideration for context and multiple players in the supply chain. The authors contend that it is urgent to re-appropriate our own agency as SCM researchers.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Early Careers in Education: Perspectives for Students and NQTs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-585-9

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Belinda Wheaton

This chapter evaluates research from the past 10 years suggesting that surfing can help develop ecological sensibilities and, in turn, lead to more environmentally…

Abstract

This chapter evaluates research from the past 10 years suggesting that surfing can help develop ecological sensibilities and, in turn, lead to more environmentally sustainable lifestyles and practices.

The first part of the chapter reviews some of the key themes in the movement toward more sustainable surfing, including surfers' lifestyle practices. The second part of the chapter offers more in-depth case studies of (1) the production and consumption of surfboards and (2) the emergence of wave pools. Through these two case studies the chapter explores more promising practices that are driving more desirable human–surfing–environment relationships.

The chapter highlights the key tensions in debates over the so-called sustainable surfing movement. While surfers continue to see themselves as environmentally connected and having special relationships to the environment and sustainability, there are many contradictions and inconsistencies in this relationship. The negative environmental impact of the surfing industry remains notable, including in tourism, board manufacturing, and surfing events. The chapter highlights the limitations of relying on market-based, technologically dependent approaches to sustainable development.

The chapter shows the potential and promise of technological innovation for more environmentally sustainable practices, while recognizing the ongoing challenges in changing attitudes in the surf industry, and among many participants/consumers. It echoes broader literatures showing that attitudes and behaviors around environmental issues are complex and paradoxical.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Igor Hadjamberdiev

Courses on sustainable development (SD) are taught in several institutes of Kyrgyzstan. However, courses for the specialties “eco‐technology”, and “ecological exploitation…

Abstract

Courses on sustainable development (SD) are taught in several institutes of Kyrgyzstan. However, courses for the specialties “eco‐technology”, and “ecological exploitation of natural resources” are only offered by two institutes. There are two alternative courses: for students; and (two months) for decision makers. The theoretical‐cognitive base of the courses includes Rio 92 documents, Club of Rome Reports, Brundlandt Report, Vernadsky biosphere‐nooshere theory, and the Kyrgyzstani Comprehensive Development Framework 2001‐2010. Three problems are also included: administrative apparatus reform; economy restoration (mining, water‐soil‐energy); and poverty alleviation. Philosophy, recent nature concept, regional and global problems are also included in the courses. A focus point in the courses is to restore balances between nature conservation and nature‐using activities, especially in the energy field (oil, gas, coal, and alternative energy from sun and wind). Sun, including collectors for water, building heating and processes for drying crops and vegetables by sunlight, are also included in the course. Small hydroelectric power stations (1‐22KW) might be used in the country's mountain range. The courses also deal with Central Asian ethnic problems (sharp divisions by ethnicity such as Turkish, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Iranian, Tadjik). There is also a course in emotional form, using poetry and (sometimes religious) verses. The courses have been taught since 1998. Thus far 400 students and 92 administrators passed the course. In this paper, the specific approach of the course, investigating SD at a conceptual as well as an emotional level, will be evaluated. Reflects on the question of how successful this approach might be for developing countries in general.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

If there's just one thing a global recession can teach us it is that nations' economies are dependent on each other. Never before has the phrase “global village” been so true. Emerging market organizations have been making their presence felt and doing it in a way which can be quite startling for some traditionalists of the “western world”.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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