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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Peterson K. Ozili

Purpose: This chapter discusses the need for climate change risk mitigation and why it is not the responsibility of Central Banks to mitigate climate change risk.…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter discusses the need for climate change risk mitigation and why it is not the responsibility of Central Banks to mitigate climate change risk.

Methodology: This chapter uses critical discourse analysis to explain why central banks should not have the responsibility for climate change risk mitigation.

Findings: This chapter argues that the responsibility for managing climate change risk should lie with elected officials, other groups and institutions but not Central Banks. Elected officials, or politicians, should be held responsible to deal with the consequence of climate change events. Also, international organizations and everybody can take responsibility for climate change while the Central Bank can provide assistance – but Central Banks should not lead the climate policy making or mitigation agenda.

Implication: The policy implication is that the responsibility for climate change risk mitigation should be shifted to politicians who are elected officials of the people. Also, international climate change organizations or groups can take responsibility for mitigating the climate change risk of member countries. Finally, citizens in a country or region should have equal responsibility for climate change. Climate information should be provided to every citizen to help them prepare for future climatic conditions.

Originality: This chapter propagates the idea that Central Banks should take a lead role in dealing with the problems of climate change. This chapter is the first chapter to contest a Central Bank-led climate change risk mitigation agenda.

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Judith Mair

The purpose of this paper is to consider some of the issues of vulnerability and risk, mitigation, adaptation and the adaptive capacity of events. Given the significance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider some of the issues of vulnerability and risk, mitigation, adaptation and the adaptive capacity of events. Given the significance of events to community, society and the economy, it seems imperative that the risks of any potential negative effects of climate change on this sector are understood, and that the capacity of events to adapt to and mitigate climate change is identified.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory conceptual paper considers some of the issues of vulnerability and risk, mitigation, adaptation and the adaptive capacity of events, and highlights the fact that different types of events are likely to be affected unequally by climate change.

Findings

The paper finds that different types of events are likely to be impacted in different ways by climate change. It also concludes that smaller, community events and larger hallmark events are likely to be most seriously affected by climate change, as they are types of events which rely on specific locations and venues.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations are those of a conceptual paper – although the empirical research on climate change and tourism may reflect the situation for the events industry, this has not yet been tested. Future research should test the propositions in this paper.

Practical implications

The paper suggests strongly that the events industry should incorporate strategies for adapting to climate change impacts into its policy and planning. Some of the likely climate change impacts are identified in the paper, along with potential adaptation solutions.

Originality/value

This topic has not yet been addressed in the academic literature and therefore the paper represents an important step in the understanding of climate change. The paper has academic value as a platform to underpin future research and practical value for event organisers planning for an uncertain future.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Patricia J Hartman

Keeping up with the abundance of new materials on climate change can be a challenge for selectors of library materials. There is a need for an updated list of recommended…

Abstract

Purpose

Keeping up with the abundance of new materials on climate change can be a challenge for selectors of library materials. There is a need for an updated list of recommended titles in the library literature.

Design/methodology/approach

An exhaustive literature review was performed on climate change books published within the past four years.

Findings

The following is an annotated bibliography of 22 recommended titles focused on climate change that were published within that timeframe.

Originality/value

This will be helpful to librarians seeking to develop or update climate change collections.

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Melissa Nursey‐Bray

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the development of climate change adaptation curricula. Instituting adaptation frameworks that can assist professionals to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the development of climate change adaptation curricula. Instituting adaptation frameworks that can assist professionals to respond to climate change, yet be tailored to specific sectoral needs is crucial. Professionals working at the coalface of the climate change challenge need to build new skills and create innovative solutions in social and political contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Using case studies, this paper reflects on the experience of developing climate change curricula at multiple levels and the obstacles to implementation of the links between curriculum and practice. This includes reflections on the necessity of interlinking political, social and economic aspects together in delivery of such a course.

Findings

The paper finds that a strictly content – based approach to curriculum development is inadequate. The context of an issue like climate change requires attention to the specific needs of the target audience, in addition to delivery of generic content, so as to achieve the industry uptake critical to ensuring social and political objectives are implemented on the ground.

Originality/value

The paper concludes by examining the utility of such educational initiatives to build community resilience, forge networks between multiple sectors and contribute to achieving social/institutional, political and economic outcomes for adaptation to climate change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Peterson K. Ozili

Climate change is emerging as an important issue increasing uncertainty in the business circle, and financial institutions through their inaction seem to be unmoved by…

Abstract

Climate change is emerging as an important issue increasing uncertainty in the business circle, and financial institutions through their inaction seem to be unmoved by climate change risk despite the potential for climate change events to affect the financial institutions and the financial system. In this chapter, the effect of climate change on financial institutions and the financial system are highlighted and discussed.

Details

Uncertainty and Challenges in Contemporary Economic Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-095-2

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Norma Gomez

– This paper aims to assess the vulnerability of the farmer-respondents in Southern Philippines, specifically Region XI and XII, to climate change.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the vulnerability of the farmer-respondents in Southern Philippines, specifically Region XI and XII, to climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted an empirical analysis of the impact of climate change on maize (Zea mays), banana (Musa sapientum) and durian (Durio zibethinus) production. Furthermore, it estimated the determinants of adaptation to climate change and its corresponding effect on farm productivity. The analysis used primary data from 541 farmer-respondents producing maize, banana and durian in the 6 provinces and 18 municipalities of the sample areas.

Findings

Based on the probit estimate results, farmers adaptation decisions were influenced by information about future climate change conditions, social capital, access to formal extension and farmer-to-farmer extension. The author found from the stochastic frontier estimation in the production function that climate change adaptations exerted a significant impact on farm productivity. It helped in coping with the adverse effects and risk of climate change while increasing agricultural productivities of the farmer-respondents.

Originality/value

This research paper will be an addition to the body of knowledge on the socioeconomic aspects on the climate change and adaptation on the production of maize, banana and durian in the case of a developing country like Southern Philippines. This will bring more insights into the adaptation strategies that are crucial to cope with climatic variability and change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Fetalai Gagaeolo, Sarah Hemstock and Connor Price

This chapter examines the perceived socio-cultural impacts of relocation to Fiji through the lens of target communities in Kiribati. Findings based on the perceptions of…

Abstract

This chapter examines the perceived socio-cultural impacts of relocation to Fiji through the lens of target communities in Kiribati. Findings based on the perceptions of Kiribati communities reveal that relocation is the last ‘adaptation resort’ to escape and offset individual losses caused by climate change. It is viewed as an option that will compromise their socio-cultural practices and values in the long term. This study indicates that attention should not be focused only on factors that drive human relocation but should also prioritise justifications of those who choose not to relocate. This approach will better serve community expectations for in-country climate change adaptation and help shape future strategies and/or policies on climate change-driven relocation. Finally, policies and adaptation initiatives should be holistically framed; integrating values that are important to grassroots level such as socio-cultural values; and spiritual and mobility concerns for informed decision-making at all levels.

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Oluyemi Theophilus Adeosun, Peter Asare-Nuamah and Franklin Nantui Mabe

Aside from oil, the Nigerian economy is largely agrarian, which is rain-fed. Hence the criticality of understanding climate change and its impact on agricultural output is…

Abstract

Purpose

Aside from oil, the Nigerian economy is largely agrarian, which is rain-fed. Hence the criticality of understanding climate change and its impact on agricultural output is more pressing than ever. This is in line with Sustainable Development Goal 13 which is to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts. Regardless, Nigeria has in the past five decades experienced a significant increase in temperature, in the range of 10 to over 30 degree Celsius. Therefore, managing the effect of climate change on agricultural output now has the colouration of a developmental challenge.

Design/methodology/approach

In light of this, this study gives due consideration to the impact of climate change on agricultural output between the years 1986 and 2015. For the purpose of analysis, descriptive statistics, unit root test and the ordinary least square (OLS) estimation technique were employed.

Findings

Findings from the study reveal that the average annual rainfall, temperature and forest area positively influence agricultural output, whereas drought, floods and agricultural nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions have negative impact on agricultural output. The study suggests the need for a regulatory framework and also an explicit national agricultural policy essential to offset the negative effects of climate change especially on agricultural output.

Originality/value

As Nigeria look to diversify her economy which relied on oil, agriculture is among the alternative sector hoping to drive her economic growth, therefore, it is pertinent to examine the current output in the sector given the effects of climate change.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Subhash Abhayawansa and Carol Adams

This paper aims to evaluate non-financial reporting (NFR) frameworks insofar as risk reporting is concerned. This is facilitated through analysis of the adequacy of climate

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate non-financial reporting (NFR) frameworks insofar as risk reporting is concerned. This is facilitated through analysis of the adequacy of climate- and pandemic-related risk reporting in three industries that are both significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and are at risk from climate change. The pervasiveness of pandemic and climate-change risks have been highlighted in 2020, the hottest year on record and the year the COVID-19 pandemic struck. Stakeholders might reasonably expect reporting on these risks to have prepared them for the consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

The current debate on the “complexity” of sustainability and NFR frameworks/standards is critically analysed in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and calls to “build back better”. Context is provided through analysis of risk reporting by the ten largest airlines and the five largest companies in each of the hotel and cruise industries.

Findings

Risk reporting on two significant issues, pandemics and climate change, is woefully inadequate. While very little consideration has been given to pandemic risks, disclosures on climate-related risks focus predominantly on “risks” of increased regulation rather than physical risks, indicating a short-term focus. The disclosures are dispersed across different corporate reporting media and fail to appreciate the long-term consequences or offer solutions. Mindful that a conceptual framework for NFR must address this, the authors propose a new definition of materiality and recommend that sustainable development risks and opportunities be placed at the core of a future framework for connected/integrated reporting.

Research limitations/implications

For sustainable development risks to be perceived as “real” by managers, further research is needed to determine the nature and extent of key sustainable development risks and the most effective mitigation strategies.

Social implications

This paper highlights the importance of recognising the complexity of the issues facing organisations, society and the planet and addressing them by encouraging robust consideration of the interdependencies in evolving approaches to corporate reporting.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the current debate on the future of corporate reporting in light of two significant interconnected crises that threaten business and society – the pandemic and climate change. It provides evidence to support a long-term oriented and holistic approach to risk management and reporting.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Jacob A. Miller

The purpose of this paper is to explain the US society’s insignificant mitigation of climate change using Niklas Luhmann’s (1989) autopoietic social systems theory in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the US society’s insignificant mitigation of climate change using Niklas Luhmann’s (1989) autopoietic social systems theory in ecological communication. Specifically, the author’s analysis falls within the context of Luhmann re-moralized while focusing on particular function systems’ binary codes and their repellence of substantive US climate change mitigation policy across systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The author achieves this purpose by resituating Luhmann’s conception of evolution to forgo systems teleology and better contextualize the spatial-temporal scale of climate change; reinforcing complexity reduction and differentiation by integrating communication and media scholar John D. Peters’s (1999) “communication chasm” concept as one mechanism through which codes sustain over time; and applying these integrated concepts to prominent the US climate change mitigation attempts.

Findings

The author concludes that climate change mitigation efforts are the amalgamation of the systems’ moral communications. Mitigation efforts have relegated themselves to subsystems of the ten major systems given the polarizing nature of their predominant care/harm moral binary. Communication chasms persist because these moral communications cannot both adhere to the systems’ binary codes and communicate the climate crisis’s urgency. The more time that passes, the more codes force mitigation organizations, activist efforts and their moral communications to adapt and sacrifice their actions to align with the encircling systems’ code.

Social implications

In addition to the conceptual contribution, the social implication is that by identifying how and why climate change mitigation efforts are subsumed by the larger systems and their codes, climate change activists and practitioners can better tool their tactics to change the codes at the heart of the systems if serious and substantive climate change mitigation is to prevail.

Originality/value

To the author’s knowledge, there has not been an integration of a historical communication concept into, and sociological application of, ecological communication in the context of climate change mitigation.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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