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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Clifford G. Hurst

The purpose of this paper is to expand the recent lines of inquiry into entrepreneurial cognition by focusing on the structure of values as an important aspect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand the recent lines of inquiry into entrepreneurial cognition by focusing on the structure of values as an important aspect of cognition. Value theory, or axiology, posits that the capacity to value and to make value judgments is a distinctly human function – one that is a higher order process than is pure cognition alone.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is designed as a quantitative discovery. A well-established assessment instrument from the field of value science is used to measure deep-seated, evaluative thought patterns for a sample of founders of early stage startups and a comparative sample of senior managers. Value structures underlying cognition for individuals across these samples are compared to reveal both similarities and differences between the groups.

Findings

This study identifies a cognitive process underlying opportunity recognition, evaluation and exploitation, known as integration. This study finds that entrepreneurs have stronger capacities for integrative thinking than do managers. In contrast to other published research, this study finds that early stage entrepreneurs are not characterized by hubris, an inflated sense of self-efficacy, nor an exceptional capacity for action.

Originality/value

This paper extends the study of entrepreneurial cognition by applying an empirical measure of the foundational levels of cognition. It reveals heretofore unarticulated differences, as well as similarities, between entrepreneurs and managers.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2008

Clifford G. Hurst

The purpose of this paper is to propose that consumer goodwill can best be understood as a limited, but potentially renewable resource. Like a renewable natural resource…

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2266

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that consumer goodwill can best be understood as a limited, but potentially renewable resource. Like a renewable natural resource, consumer goodwill can be over‐exploited. A review of the rise and rapid fall of the business‐to‐consumer (b‐to‐c) telemarketing industry in the USA provides evidence that over‐exploitation of consumer goodwill is precisely what happened. Using telemarketing as a case study, the paper aims to argue that direct marketing practices ought to be managed in accordance with principles of sustainability. If they are not, the consequences may be sudden and near‐permanent declines in consumer responsiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper interprets the rise and rapid fall of b‐to‐c telemarketing in the USA through the theoretical framework of sustainability. The rise of telemarketing began in the early 1990s with the adoption of predictive dialer technology. Its demise can be marked by the passage of the Federal Do Not Call Registry in 2003.

Findings

It was found that the framework of sustainability does, in fact, seem to adequately describe events surrounding the rise, then near‐collapse of b‐to‐c telemarketing in the USA during this timeframe.

Research limitations/implications

Being a conceptual paper, the principal finding is that there exists a real, but yet‐undefined threshold of consumer goodwill towards consumer telemarketing. How can that threshold be determined? How can industry self‐regulate to remain below its threshold? Can an industry that has over‐exploited its consumer threshold of goodwill ever recover? These questions are raised, not answered.

Originality/value

The paper applies the concept of sustainability to direct marketing. It will be of interest to any researchers or practitioners who seek to comprehend what worked so well then went quickly so wrong with b‐to‐c telemarketing in the USA. The findings may help to prevent similar consumer backlashes in other countries where b‐to‐c telemarketing has only begun to become common practice. These findings may also have value for practitioners who rely on consumer goodwill in other direct marketing channels, such as e‐mail and catalog marketing.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2016

Alan Walks and Dylan Simone

The precise relationships between neoliberalization, financialization, and rising risk are still being debated in the literature. This paper examines, and challenges, the…

Abstract

The precise relationships between neoliberalization, financialization, and rising risk are still being debated in the literature. This paper examines, and challenges, the Financial Instability Hypothesis (FIH) developed by Hyman Minsky and his adherents. In this perspective, the level of financial risk builds over time as participants orient their behavior in relation to assessments of past levels of risk performance, leading them to overly optimistic valuation estimates and increasingly risky behavior with each subsequent cycle. However, there are problems with this approach, and many questions remain, including how participants modify their exposure to risk over time, how risk is scaled, and who benefits from changes in exposure to risk. This paper examines such questions and proposes an alternate perspective on financial instability and risk, in light of the history of risk management within Canada’s housing finance sector. The rise of financialization in Canada has been accompanied by shifts in the sectoral and scalar locus of risk within the housing sector, from the federal state, to lower levels of government, third-sector organizations, and finally, private households. In each case, the transfer of risk has occurred as participants in each stage sought to reduce their own risk exposure in light of realistic and even pessimistic (not optimistic) expectations deriving from past exposure, contradicting basic assumptions of Minsky’s FIH. This is the process that has driven the neoliberalization of housing finance in Canada, characterized by the socialization of lender risk while households increasingly take on the financial and social risks relating to shelter.

Details

Risking Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-235-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Susan Hurst

– The paper aims to describe the effect of changes in UK higher education policy on services and staff in university libraries.

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2644

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe the effect of changes in UK higher education policy on services and staff in university libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of academic literature, higher education statistics and news pieces was used to supplement the author's 16 years' experience of academic library work to identify the main trends in academic library services as student numbers enter a period of likely decline. The paper considers the motivating factors behind these changes in library design, library collections and services and how the culture of academic libraries is changing as a result.

Findings

It is suggested that the culture of business improvement and performance measurement, which libraries have followed their university institutions in adopting, has implications for the culture of customer service in libraries; that traditional library services will continue to be marginalised by the automation of services and remote and virtual access to services; that current librarians may be ill prepared for the changing services they operate.

Originality/value

The paper offers a survey of current trends in university libraries from the point of view of a front line library service worker and should be of interest to other library professionals.

Details

New Library World, vol. 114 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2015

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for Multidisciplinary Programs: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-847-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1969

D.J. CAMPBELL

This is a very odd paper, certainly one of the oddest ever published by Aslib: odd in subject, form and author. A patient reader will find out why.

Abstract

This is a very odd paper, certainly one of the oddest ever published by Aslib: odd in subject, form and author. A patient reader will find out why.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 21 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Current issues of Publishers' Weekly are reporting serious shortages of paper, binders board, cloth, and other essential book manufacturing materials. Let us assure you…

Abstract

Current issues of Publishers' Weekly are reporting serious shortages of paper, binders board, cloth, and other essential book manufacturing materials. Let us assure you these shortages are very real and quite severe.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1981

A. Meenaghan and Peter W. Turnbull

Reviews product life cycle theory and examines empirical evidence. Reports on empirical research carried out to determine the applicability of the theory to popular record…

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2385

Abstract

Reviews product life cycle theory and examines empirical evidence. Reports on empirical research carried out to determine the applicability of the theory to popular record products. Proposes a framework of the relationship between the producer life cycle and the marketing mix.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Nicki Pombier

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process that centers and acts on the knowledge contained in and expressed by the lived experience of the disabled nonresearchers. This chapter situates narrative allyship across ability in the landscape of other participatory research practices, with a particular focus on oral history as a social justice praxis.

Approach: In order to explore the potential of this practice, the author outlines and reflects on both the methodology of her oral history graduate thesis work, a narrative project with self-advocates with Down syndrome, and includes and analyzes reflections about narrative allyship from a self-advocate with Down syndrome.

Findings: The author proposes three guiding principles for research as narrative allyship across ability, namely that such research further the interests of narrators as the narrators define them, optimize the autonomy of narrators, and tell stories with, instead of about, narrators.

Implications: This chapter suggests the promise of research praxis as a form of allyship: redressing inequality by addressing power, acknowledging expertise in subjugated knowledges, and connecting research practices to desires for social change or political outcomes. The author models methods by which others might include in their research narrative work across ability and demonstrates the particular value of knowledge produced when researchers attend to the lived expertise of those with disabilities. The practice of narrative allyship across ability has the potential to bring a wide range of experiences and modes of expression into the domains of research, history, policy, and culture that would otherwise exclude them.

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