Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Lawrence F. Cunningham, Clifford E. Young, Moonkyu Lee and Wolfgang Ulaga

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a study that examined how customers in the USA, France, and Korea perceived and classified a set of 13 services…

5067

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a study that examined how customers in the USA, France, and Korea perceived and classified a set of 13 services based on multidimensional scaling (MDS).

Design/methodology/approach

A MDS framework was used to map service classifications and actual services in the USA, Korea and France. Results from each country were then compared to the other two countries to determine similarities and differences.

Findings

Results from this research suggest that there are two underlying dimensions that explain approximately 80 percent of the total variance in service perceptions and classifications. Underlying dimensions of the classifications across the three cultures were virtually identical. Differences among the countries were based on relative positioning of classifications and/or services on the underlying dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Evidence from diverse cultures implies that consumers perceive services in a somewhat simplistic, two‐dimensional fashion rather than the complex set of classifications proposed by researchers. Although the complex classifications may be of use to service providers in organizing the delivery of services, the presentation and positioning of those services is along a much simpler framework in the minds of customers.

Originality/value

This is the first time consumer‐based perceptions of services have been examined systematically across cultures using a MDS approach.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Lawrence F. Cunningham, Clifford E. Young and James Gerlach

Few marketing studies look at service classifications for self‐service technologies (SSTs) and none directly compare consumer‐based perceptions of traditional services to…

6380

Abstract

Purpose

Few marketing studies look at service classifications for self‐service technologies (SSTs) and none directly compare consumer‐based perceptions of traditional services to SSTs. To fill this gap, this study aims to examine how customers perceived traditional services and SSTs on service classifications criteria proposed by Lovelock, Bowen and Bell.

Design/methodology/approach

In two separate studies consumer ratings for each classification method on each service were obtained. Using multi‐dimensional scaling (MDS), 13 traditional services and 12 SSTs were separately mapped onto a perceptual space of service classifications.

Findings

The comparison of the two perceptual spaces reveals that consumers viewed the classifications of convenience, person/object, and delivery for SSTs differently than that for traditional services. The classifications of traditional services were represented by two dimensions of customization/standardization and person/object. In contrast, the classifications of SSTs were represented by two dimensions of customization/standardization and separability/inseparability. Thus the description of the underlying dimensions of services varied by traditional services or SSTs.

Research limitations/implications

It is possible that the results of the MDS were influenced by the use of preset classifications. Results may also be influenced by the authors' choice of MDS method. Further research is needed regarding the classification of SSTs and the use of these classifications for SST design.

Originality/value

This research extends previous consumer‐based classification research by including SSTs. The findings identified separate typologies for SSTs and traditional services. The typologies should be of interest to both researchers and managers who are interested in how SSTs are perceived by consumers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

David W Cravens, Thomas N Ingram and Raymond W LaForge

Presents a portfolio model for multi‐sales channel effortdeployment. Shows how the approach can help sales management restructuresales channels. Notes that combining an…

1134

Abstract

Presents a portfolio model for multi‐sales channel effort deployment. Shows how the approach can help sales management restructure sales channels. Notes that combining an organization′s selling effort into multiple sales channels can be facilitated through an analytical approach that considers variations in customer requirements, buying power and contact costs. Concludes that implementing a successful multiple sales channel strategy offers impressive productivity opportunities.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Lawrence F. Cunningham, Clifford E. Young, Wolfgang Ulaga and Moonkyu Lee

In the services marketing literature, few service classifications are based on how customers view services, and fewer of these have been validated cross‐culturally. To…

2772

Abstract

In the services marketing literature, few service classifications are based on how customers view services, and fewer of these have been validated cross‐culturally. To fill this gap, this research presents the results of a study that examined how US and French customers perceived and classified a set of 13 services based on multidimensional scaling. Service classifications were developed on a perceptual space where the actual services were mapped for two countries, the USA and France. The results of the study suggest that there are two underlying dimensions that explain approximately 80 percent of the total variance in service perceptions and classifications. The dimensions and correlations for the classifications and services displayed many consistencies and some differences among American and French consumers. Directions for future academic research and managerial implications are cited and discussed.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Lawrence F. Cunningham, James H. Gerlach, Michael D. Harper and Clifford E. Young

This research aims to investigate the premise that the use of internet airline reservation systems is perceived to be riskier than traditional airline reservation shopping.

17631

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate the premise that the use of internet airline reservation systems is perceived to be riskier than traditional airline reservation shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 263 respondents investigated perceived risk at various stages of the consumer buying process.

Findings

The results reveal that perceived risk for airline reservation services follows a pattern throughout the consumer buying process. When viewed as a dynamic process, perceived risk for internet airline services shows more radical changes in risk levels than the traditional service. The analyses indicate that performance, physical, social, and financial risk are related to perceived risk at certain stages of the consumer buying process.

Practical implications

A major finding of this study is that there is a risk premium for internet airline reservation services and the risk premium permeates all stages of the consumer buying process. It is further demonstrated that the internet risk premium does affect usage levels; implying that the internet risk premium is consequential and warrants the implementation of risk mitigation strategies.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies on perceived risk that typically focused on the relationship of perceived risk and information search, this study examines the dynamics of perceived risk throughout the various stages of the consumer buying process.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Donald R. Lehmann

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Nigel F. Piercy, David W. Cravens and Neil A. Morgan

The significance of the search for sales organization effectiveness is underlined by the major costs represented by the field salesforce for many organizations, and it is…

5454

Abstract

The significance of the search for sales organization effectiveness is underlined by the major costs represented by the field salesforce for many organizations, and it is heightened by the pressures of global competition and new challenges to develop long‐term customer relationships as the foundation for competitive and sustainable marketing strategies. A study of sales management in British companies adds to an emerging research stream by identifying certain characteristics of superior performance and effectiveness in the business‐to‐business sales organization. We find that conventional measures of salesforce size, call‐rates, costs and productivity reveal relatively little about the differences between more effective and less effective sales organizations and may be dangerously misleading. The hallmarks of effective sales organizations we found to be: balanced compensation strategy; successful salesperson characteristics, in terms of motivation, customer orientation, team orientation, and sales support orientation; high performance in the drivers of sales effectiveness, i.e. sales presentation, technical knowledge, but most particularly adaptiveness, teamwork, sales planning, and sales support; the use of behaviour‐based control approaches involving effective monitoring, directing, evaluating and rewarding activities by sales managers; and, sound organizational structures. The research findings contribute benchmarks to a powerful management agenda to be addressed by executives in pursuing sales organization effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Asya Draganova

Abstract

Details

Popular Music in Contemporary Bulgaria: At the Crossroads
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-697-8

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1934

14. Peppermint extract is the flavouring extract prepared from oil of peppermint, or from peppermint, or both, and contains not less than 3 per cent. by volume by oil of…

Abstract

14. Peppermint extract is the flavouring extract prepared from oil of peppermint, or from peppermint, or both, and contains not less than 3 per cent. by volume by oil of peppermint.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Melissa J. Tetzlaff-Bemiller

Purpose – This chapter aims to present an overview of what constitutes child murder, including definitions, history, prevalence, risk factors, offender motivations, and…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter aims to present an overview of what constitutes child murder, including definitions, history, prevalence, risk factors, offender motivations, and theoretical understanding.

Design/methodology/approach – The author uses secondary data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System, Uniformed Crime Reports, and Vital Statistics to show comparisons with previously conducted research. This allows for an overview of child murder.

Findings – There are numerous inconsistencies due to methodological issues. It is hard to find studies where a large sample was used. Definitions of child vary between studies, as does the age categories used. In addition, child homicide is predicted to be grossly underrepresented due to lack of communication between agencies, lack of formalized training, lack of a formalized classification system, and lack of reporting.

Originality/value – Research on child homicide can be instrumental in many areas including policy creation, implementation, and evaluation. It can serve as a benefit for those attempting to provide preventative measures. It may also help law enforcement with investigation. It is only through continued analysis of these types of cases and vigilant research, policy, and practice that society can more effectively protect young children from exposure to potentially murderous outcomes.

Details

Homicide and Violent Crime
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-876-5

Keywords

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