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1 – 10 of 108
Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2014

Gervase R. Bushe and Robert J. Marshak

Extending the argument made in Bushe and Marshak (2009) of the emergence of a new species of Organization Development (OD) that we label Dialogic, to differentiate it from…

Abstract

Extending the argument made in Bushe and Marshak (2009) of the emergence of a new species of Organization Development (OD) that we label Dialogic, to differentiate it from the foundational Diagnostic form, we argue that how any OD method is used in practice will be depend on the mindset of the practitioner. Six variants of Dialogic OD practice are reviewed and compared to aid in identification of a Weberian ideal-type Dialogic Mindset, consisting of eight premises that distinguish it from the foundational Diagnostic Mindset. Three core change processes that underlie all successful Dialogic OD processes are proposed, and suggestions for future research offered.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-312-4

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Cliff Oswick, Tom Keenoy, Armin Beverungen, Nick Ellis, Ida Sabelis and Sierk Ybema

The purpose of this paper is to consider the interplay between discourse, policy and practice in relation to aspects of organization and processes of organizing.

988

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the interplay between discourse, policy and practice in relation to aspects of organization and processes of organizing.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides an introduction to the six contributions contained in this special issue and discusses how they relate to the core theme.

Findings

Highlights the need for an approach which treats discourses, policies and practices as connected and mutually implicated, rather than discrete, phenomena.

Originality/value

Presents an approach to discourse analysis which promotes an engagement with wider aspects of social activity.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 27 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Maurizio Floris, David Grant and Cliff Oswick

This chapter outlines a discursive epistemology of knowledge production through an analysis of the role of time and context in the social construction of organizational…

Abstract

This chapter outlines a discursive epistemology of knowledge production through an analysis of the role of time and context in the social construction of organizational insights, outcomes and theories. While the role of time and context has been widely acknowledged in organizational discourse analysis, it has remained unclear what is specific to knowledge generation. Drawing upon a case study of an attempted company acquisition, the authors illustrate how knowledge is discursively produced and consumed during a process of strategizing. The analysis of this study shows how knowledge producing processes (e.g., strategizing, theorizing, conceptualizing and hypothesizing) extend both the time horizon of discourses that relate to the future, and the context horizon for discourse(s) that relate to the broader context. This reconstructs the tapestry of interwoven discourses that make up a local discourse and enable new managerial knowledge to be produced.

Details

The Production of Managerial Knowledge and Organizational Theory: New Approaches to Writing, Producing and Consuming Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-183-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

David Grant, Grant Michelson, Cliff Oswick and Nick Wailes

This paper aims to examine the contribution that discourse analysis can make to understanding organizational change.

5710

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the contribution that discourse analysis can make to understanding organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

It identifies five key contributions. Discourse analytic approaches: reveal the important role of discourse in the social construction of organizational change; demonstrate how the meaning attached to organizational change initiatives comes about as a result of a discursive process of negotiation among key actors; show that the discourses of change should be regarded as intertextual; provide a valuable multi‐disciplinary perspective on change; and exhibit a capacity, to generate fresh insights into a wide variety of organizational change related issues.

Findings

To illustrate these contributions the paper examines the five empirical studies included in this special issue. It discusses the potential for future discursive studies of organizational change phenomena and the implications of this for the field of organizational change more generally.

Originality/value

Provides an introduction to the special issue on discourse and organizational change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Cliff Oswick, David Grant, Grant Michelson and Nick Wailes

This paper aims to review the discursive formation of organizational change and to consider the possible directions that change management initiatives may take in the future.

6663

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the discursive formation of organizational change and to consider the possible directions that change management initiatives may take in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This closing piece identifies a traditional change discourse and an emerging change discourse. This is achieved through a review of the extant literature and the contributions to the special issue.

Findings

The paper highlights a shift of emphases in organizational change due to environmental imperatives. In particular, it reveals a move from problem‐centred, discrete interventions to a focus on continuous improvements. It also draws attention to the emerging significance of discourse‐based approaches concerned with image, identity, organizational learning and knowledge management.

Originality/value

Provides a framework for classifying different forms of organizational change activity and posits directions for future development.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Cliff Oswick and John Montgomery

This article presents the results of a metaphor‐based investigation of managers, supervisors and team leaders drawn from the UK subsidiaries of a large US multinational…

5585

Abstract

This article presents the results of a metaphor‐based investigation of managers, supervisors and team leaders drawn from the UK subsidiaries of a large US multinational. Participants were asked two main questions, namely: if you were asked to compare your organisation to an animal – what animal would it be? and If the organisation was part of a car – what part of a car would it be? The selection of animals equates to aspects of organisational change. Images of heavy and slow moving animals exemplified low levels of change activity while lean, fast moving, and often predatory animals portray an adaptive organisation responding to a turbulent environment. The car part descriptions were largely concerned with aspects of corporate strategy and primarily conveyed the characteristics “movement” and “direction”. The article discusses these insights in relation to the case study organisation. It also considers the role, status and utility of metaphor in the study of organisations.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Cliff Oswick

561

Abstract

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Abstract

Details

The Production of Managerial Knowledge and Organizational Theory: New Approaches to Writing, Producing and Consuming Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-183-4

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Theodora Asimakou and Cliff Oswick

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact of the introduction of a commerical discourse within a scientific context (i.e. a research and development (R&D…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact of the introduction of a commerical discourse within a scientific context (i.e. a research and development (R&D) setting). It explores the reconstitution of professional identities, becoming customer focused and changing time orientations.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon the concept of recontextualization as a discursive framework for analysis, extensive fieldwork was undertaken in a multinational oil company involving informal conversations, formal interviews with R&D staff (n = 41), secondary data analysis and non‐participant observation.

Findings

The major finding is that the commercialization of R&D operations was resented, but not resisted, by established R&D scientists. The reasons for the absence of resistance are discussed.

Originality/value

This work contributes to the understanding of the recontextualization of discourse in professional settings. It also offers insights into the colonizing and commodifying effects of the commercialization discourse.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 30 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Geoff Lightfoot and Simon Lilley

The purpose of this paper is to briefly explore some recent curious interlocking of the ideology of markets and the practice of policy.

393

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to briefly explore some recent curious interlocking of the ideology of markets and the practice of policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This particular discursive combine has most visibly been apparent in the concatenated birth and death of the US Defense Department's so‐called “Policy Analysis Market” (PAM). Yet PAM is but the most notorious example of a more sustained and pervasive attempt to use the technologies and disciplines of markets to render policy both better informed and more amenable to control through robust and seemingly incontestable systems of accountability. Given its prominence, our way in is through a brief description of PAM's origins and demise.

Findings

It is found that PAM and its similar brethren of markets for use in policy formation and judgement are less concerned with the capture of reality and more with the disciplining power of a curious “objectivity”.

Originality/value

Projects such as PAM are thus not easily challengeable on grounds of their veracity. Rather research that seeks to interrogate the use of market technologies in policy must look to their context and effects.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 27 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 108