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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

M. Afzalur Rahim, David Antonioni and Clement Psenicka

This study tested a structural equations model of the five French and Raven bases of supervisory power (coercive, reward, legitimate, expert, and referent), styles of…

Abstract

This study tested a structural equations model of the five French and Raven bases of supervisory power (coercive, reward, legitimate, expert, and referent), styles of handling conflict with supervisor (problem solving and bargaining), and job performance. Employees (N = 1,116) completed questionnaires on power and conflict styles, and their job performance was evaluated by their respective supervisors (N = 398). The data were aggregated for the subordinates associated with a given manager (N = 398) to make sure that independent observation assumption is not violated. The LISREL 8 analysis of data indicates that legitimate power influenced referent power positively and coercive power negatively, and reward and legitimate powers positively influenced expert power, which in turn, positively influenced referent power. Referent power, in turn, positively influenced problem solving (i.e., using more integrating and less avoiding styles) and negatively influenced bargaining (i.e., using more dominating and less obliging styles) conflict‐management styles, and finally, problem solving style, but not bargaining style, positively influenced job performance.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

M. Afzalur Rahim and Clement Psenicka

This study investigated the relationships of emotional intelligence—empathy and social skills—of supervisors to the effectiveness of their leader role. Questionnaire data…

Abstract

This study investigated the relationships of emotional intelligence—empathy and social skills—of supervisors to the effectiveness of their leader role. Questionnaire data on emotional intelligence were collected in four countries (U.S., Greece, China, and Bangladesh, N = 1,184 dyads) from employed MBA students (observers), but the data on the effectiveness of leader role were collected from the colleagues of MBA students who had the same supervisor. Responses from each dyad were matched. Data analysis showed that empathy was a mediator of the relationship between social skills and the effectiveness of leader role in the U.S., Greece, and Bangladesh, but not in China. Implications for management, directions for future research, and limitations of the study are discussed.

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International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

M. Afzalur Rahim, Clement Psenicka, Panagiotis Polychroniou, Jing‐Hua Zhao, Chun‐Sheng Yu, Kawai Anita Chan, Kwok Wai Yee Susana, Maria G. Alves, Chang‐Won Lee, Sahidur Ralunan, Shameema Ferdausy and Rene van Wyk

The study investigated the relationships of the five dimensions of emotional intelligence: self‐awareness, self‐regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills of…

Abstract

The study investigated the relationships of the five dimensions of emotional intelligence: self‐awareness, self‐regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills of supervisors to subordinates' strategies of handling conflict: problem solving and bargaining. Data (N = 1,395) for this study were collected with questionnaires from MBA students in seven countries (U.S., Greece, China, Bangladesh, Hong Kong and Macau, South Africa, and Portugal). Psychometric properties of the measures were tested and improved with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and analysis of indicator and internal consistency reliabilities, and the hypotheses were tested with a structural equations model for each country. Results in the U.S. and in the combined sample provided support for the model which suggests that self‐awareness is positively associated with self‐regulation, empathy, and social skills; self regulation is positively associated with empathy and social skills; empathy and social skills are positively associated with motivation; which in turn, is positively associated with problem solving strategy and negatively associated with bargaining strategy. Differences among countries in these relationships are noted and implications for organizations discussed.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2007

Charmine E.J. Härtel and Debra Panipucci

Just as a rotten apple makes other apples around it begin to decay, so too can people influence others within their vicinity, particularly in terms of destructive emotions…

Abstract

Just as a rotten apple makes other apples around it begin to decay, so too can people influence others within their vicinity, particularly in terms of destructive emotions and behaviors. Trevino and Youngblood (1990) adopted the term ‘bad apples’ to describe individuals who engage in unethical behaviors and who also influence others to behave in a similar manner. In this chapter, the ‘bad apple’ metaphor is adopted to describe the employee whose actions and interactions create and maintain destructive faultlines and unethical exclusion behaviors that negatively impact the emotional well-being and effective and ethical performance of the team. In particular, the chapter examines the way in which ‘bad apples’ use destructive emotion management skills through the manipulation of emotional levers of others, what motivates them to do so and the implications it may have on management.

Details

Functionality, Intentionality and Morality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1414-0

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