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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2011

Juhaini Jabar, Claudine Soosay and Ricardo Santa

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of organisational learning (comprising absorptive capacity, nature and type of alliances and learning environment…

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4914

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of organisational learning (comprising absorptive capacity, nature and type of alliances and learning environment) through strategic technology alliances on technology transfer and new product development. The paper is based on a larger research on alliances in the Malaysian manufacturing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The antecedents and outcomes of organisational learning were tested using structural equation modelling, based on data collected from 335 organisations through an online survey questionnaire.

Findings

The findings depict that absorptive capacity, nature and type of alliances and learning environment significantly affect technology transfer in Malaysian manufacturers, but not necessarily new product development simultaneously. Nevertheless, the results establish technology transfer as an effective means for building innovative capabilities in developing new products. This is imperative for attaining Malaysia's current goal in improving the manufacturing industry and becoming an industrialised nation by the year 2020.

Research limitations/implications

The findings advocate further deliberations for manufacturers in Malaysia in shaping their strategies and learning objectives when embarking on collaborative relations, as these can result in technological competencies and ultimately the capacity to develop new innovative products.

Practical implications

The paper offers useful insights for manufacturers when forming technology alliances; and facilitate decisions by current practitioners in managing collaborations. The paper also informs Malaysian Government institutions in developing mechanisms, economic policy strategies and business support services for enhancing the economic and commercial viability of Malaysian manufacturing activities and products.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in discerning the current capabilities and strategies of manufacturing firms in developing nations in order to remain competitive.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Claudine Soosay, Andrew Fearne and Benjamin Dent

The paper shows how sustainable value chain analysis (SVCA) can be used as a diagnostic tool to identify misalignment between resource allocation and consumer preferences…

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9423

Abstract

Purpose

The paper shows how sustainable value chain analysis (SVCA) can be used as a diagnostic tool to identify misalignment between resource allocation and consumer preferences, using a case study of the Oxford Landing wine chain, from South Australia to the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The study incorporates a combination of value chain analysis (VCA) and life cycle analysis (LCA) in a single methodology to determine which activities, at each stage in the supply chain, create value (in the eyes of consumers) and the contribution of these activities to greenhouse gas emissions.

Findings

The case study demonstrates the value of comparing the consumer value associated with a particular activity with the emissions associated with that activity, as this draws the attention of managers, at each stage of the supply chain, to the potential trade‐offs that exist and the danger of focusing on either one (adding value or reducing emissions) in isolation.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the research methodology is that the study focuses on a single product (Oxford Landing) and a single chain to a single country (UK). Thus, it is difficult to generalise from the results of this single case study to the (South Australian) wine industry in general, without further information from other wineries and consumer perceptions of their brands in different parts of the world.

Practical implications

The case study highlights the importance of taking a holistic view when considering the sustainability of a product, process or chain – trade‐offs between environmental benefits and consumer perceptions of value can have significant commercial implications. It also illustrates the potential for SVCA to be used as a guide for the allocation of research and development expenditure (public and private) in pursuit of sustainable competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The study is the first to combine LCA with VCA in a context that allows researchers, practitioners and policymakers to identify areas for improvement, in what they do and how they do it.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Claudine A. Soosay, Paul W. Hyland and Mario Ferrer

The purpose of this study is to investigate how collaborative relationships enhance continuous innovation in the supply chain using case studies.

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16581

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how collaborative relationships enhance continuous innovation in the supply chain using case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from semi‐structured interviews with 23 managers in ten case studies. The main intention was to comprehend how these firms engaged in collaborative relationships and their importance for successful innovation. The study adopted a qualitative approach to investigating these factors.

Findings

The findings demonstrate how differing relationships can impact on the operation of firms and their capacities to innovate. The ability to work together with partners has enabled firms to integrate and link operations for increased effectiveness as well as embark on both radical and incremental innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The research into the initiatives and strategies for collaboration was essentially exploratory. A qualitative approach using case studies acknowledged that the responses from managers were difficult to quantify or gauge the extent of these factors.

Practical implications

The findings have shown various methods where firms integrated with customers and suppliers in the supply chain. This was evident in the views of managers across all the firms examined, supporting the importance of collaboration and efficient allocation of resources throughout the supply chain. They were able to set procedures in their dealings with partners, sharing knowledge and processes, and subsequently joint‐planning and investing with them for better operations, systems and processes in the supply chain.

Originality/value

The case studies serve as examples for managers in logistics organisation who are contemplating strategies and issues on collaborative relationships. The study provides important lessons on how such relationships can impact on the operation of firms and their capability to innovate.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Connie Zheng, Paul Hyland and Claudine Soosay

The purpose of this study is to explore a range of training practices adopted by multinational companies (MNCs) operating in Asia. It investigated the level of training…

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7150

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore a range of training practices adopted by multinational companies (MNCs) operating in Asia. It investigated the level of training expenditure, the nature of training programs offered and the concerns about training in MNCs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained through a survey of 529 MNCs operating in six Asian countries to examine the average cost spent on training and the type of training programs offered to different groups of employees. The respondents were also asked to indicate their perceptions on the training provided and how effective the training has on firm performance.

Findings

It appears that MNCs invested significantly in training. Training was found to be more widespread in service organisations than manufacturing organisations operating in Asia. The majority of training emphasised managerial and professional staff development; and was generally conducted externally. Respondents were concerned mainly with the quality and relevance of training programs offered externally.

Originality/value

The results provide MNCs, especially those headquartered in European and other Western countries with insights into designing and offering more relevant and better quality training programs to their employees located in Asian subsidiaries.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Ross L. Chapman, Claudine Soosay and Jay Kandampully

Service industries hold an increasingly dynamic and pivotal role in today’s knowledge‐based economies. The logistics industry is a classic example of the birth and…

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6635

Abstract

Service industries hold an increasingly dynamic and pivotal role in today’s knowledge‐based economies. The logistics industry is a classic example of the birth and development of a vital new service‐based industry, transformed from the business concept of transportation to that of serving the entire logistical needs of customers. Quantum advances in science, technology, and communication in the new millennium have compelled firms to consider the potential of the so‐called new “resources” (technology, knowledge and relationship networks) that are essential if firms are to operate effectively within the emerging business model, and to utilise the opportunities to innovate and gain market leadership. Through an extensive literature review, this paper examines the factors that nurture innovation in logistics services, identifies the contributions of the new “resources” and, using industry examples, examines the application of these resources to logistics firms as they assume an extended role within the new business model.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2009

Claudine Soosay

The increasing mix of international and domestic students in many Australian universities provides more challenges and opportunities for those who are responsible for…

Abstract

The increasing mix of international and domestic students in many Australian universities provides more challenges and opportunities for those who are responsible for students, their successful interactions, and understanding of differences in their identity development. It also compels increased pedagogical reflections in teaching and learning strategies. This exploratory study investigates students’ perspectives on teaching and learning in a third year undergraduate course they had recently completed. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with five international and five domestic students to seek their views on the current teaching and learning methods and activities. The findings depict several implications and opportunities to improve the course delivery to enable more effective learning outcomes. It was also found that cultural diversity in the classroom can impact on student engagement; and therefore as educators, we need to examine and take action on ensuring equity, access and culturally appropriate pedagogy and curriculum.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Claudine Antoinette Soosay and Paul Hyland

This paper aims to conduct a systematic review of the literature on supply chain collaboration published over a 10-year period from 2005 to 2014. It explores the nature…

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7046

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conduct a systematic review of the literature on supply chain collaboration published over a 10-year period from 2005 to 2014. It explores the nature and extent of research undertaken to identify key themes emerging in the field and gaps that need to be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review a sample of 207 articles from 69 journals, after using an iterative cycle of defining appropriate search keywords, searching the literature and conducting the analysis.

Findings

Key themes include the meaning of collaboration; considerations for supply chain collaboration theory; emerging areas in collaboration for sustainability, technology-enabled supply chains and humanitarian supply chains; and the need for a more holistic approach, multi-tier perspectives and research into B2C collaborations.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides discussion and scope for future research into the area which would contribute to the field tremendously.

Originality/value

There have been very few reviews in the past on supply chain collaboration, and this is one of the first extensive reviews conducted to address how well the body of knowledge on supply chain collaboration corresponds with our contemporary society.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Mohsen Varsei, Claudine Soosay, Behnam Fahimnia and Joseph Sarkis

This paper aims to provide a framework which can assist focal companies in the development of sustainable supply chains. Sustainable development from an industrial…

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9908

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a framework which can assist focal companies in the development of sustainable supply chains. Sustainable development from an industrial perspective has extended beyond organisational boundaries to incorporate a supply chain approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature related to sustainable supply chain management is reviewed by incorporating concepts from four organisational theories, including the resource-based, institutional, stakeholder and social network perspectives, to illustrate key drivers and enablers of sustainability initiatives in the supply chain. A conceptual multidimensional framework is then developed that can be used for the initial assessment of supply chain sustainability.

Findings

Development and assessment of sustainability in supply chains are being increasingly incorporated as part of supply chain management today. This paper presents a multidimensional framework which can serve as a tool for research scholars and supply chain practitioners in identifying and assessing various economic, environmental and social performance indicators.

Research limitations/implications

The framework and approach presented are conceptual, and require additional and broader validation. Additional theories, at differing levels, such as individual behaviour theory, should be utilised to further enhance and evaluate the framework. Developing and integrating analytical models for prescriptive and practical supply chain solutions can enhance the applicability of the framework.

Practical implications

The framework adopts a multidimensional approach to assessing and designing sustainable supply chains, as it not only incorporates economic and environmental dimensions but also provides a practical approach to quantifying and embedding the social dimension into decision-making. The framework helps industry practitioners in initial exploration of trade-offs among economic, environmental and social performance of supply chains, which, in turn, could assist them in creating a business case for sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper is one of few studies that incorporates some of the key aspects of all three dimensions of sustainability in a single overarching framework for supply chains and offers significant theoretical contribution and implications for sustainable supply chain management.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Claudine Soosay, Breno Nunes, David John Bennett, Amrik Sohal, Juhaini Jabar and Mats Winroth

The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation of local sustainable production in Australia and Sweden aimed at exploring the factors contributing to survival and…

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2778

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation of local sustainable production in Australia and Sweden aimed at exploring the factors contributing to survival and competitiveness of manufacturing companies.

Design/methodology/approach

In Australia, six companies were studied in 2010, with comparisons being made with three of them from earlier projects. In Sweden, eight manufacturing companies were studied on two occasions 30 years apart, in 1980 and 2010. To provide a valid comparative perspective a common format for data collection and analysis was used.

Findings

There has been a shift in the nature of competition in both Sweden and Australia due to an increasing complexity of the global business environment as well as changes in technology and customer expectations. Despite the differences in country context, the findings suggest that all the manufacturing companies have a good awareness of the elements of the market environment and the relationships with their competitive strategy. However, in general, the Swedish companies have more experience of managing the risks and benefits from operating in the international environment.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the research are based on a relatively small sample of case companies in a limited number of industrial sectors. There are methodology implications for future research in the area.

Practical implications

The research results have practical implications for the manufacturing industry, especially for companies operating in a competitive international environment.

Originality/value

The paper is based on original case research and comparative analysis of data from different geographical contexts. It contributes to both theory and management practice about the strategic resources, decision choices, competitive environments and firm values needed to address external market demands as well as in building internal capabilities.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Paul W. Hyland, Claudine Soosay and Terrence R. Sloan

This paper reports on research into continuous improvement and learning in logistics. It is generally acknowledged that in today's dynamic and turbulent environment, firms…

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4242

Abstract

This paper reports on research into continuous improvement and learning in logistics. It is generally acknowledged that in today's dynamic and turbulent environment, firms have to develop capabilities that allow them to be very flexible and agile, and at the same time, be able to incorporate new (product and process) technologies that enable them to develop and exploit better practices in supply chains. This flexibility and agility calls for companies to increase their effectiveness, exploit synergies, and learn throughout all areas of their operations. This research extends a model developed by Australian and European researchers who examined learning in the product innovation process. The research developed a model of continuous innovation in the product development process and a methodology for mapping learning behaviours (termed the CIMA methodology) that was the starting point for this project. This paper focuses on ten case studies of Australian and Singaporean companies operating distribution centres.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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