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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2011

Kelly M. Mack, Claudia M. Rankins and Cynthia E. Winston

The nation's first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) were founded before the end of the U.S. Civil War. However, most were established in the post-Civil…

Abstract

The nation's first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) were founded before the end of the U.S. Civil War. However, most were established in the post-Civil War era, through the Freedmen's Bureau and other organizations such as the American Missionary Association (AMA) when the U.S. federal government initiated an organized effort to educate newly freed slaves (Hoffman, 1996). Additional support for HBCUs arose from the second Morrill Act of 1890, which provided opportunities for all races in those states where Black students were excluded from public higher education. Thus, since their founding in the 1800s, the nation's HBCUs have had as their missions to provide access to higher education for the disenfranchised and underprivileged of our society. Today, these institutions continue to make significant contributions in educating African American and other underrepresented minority students, particularly in the areas of science and engineering. Although they comprise only 3% of U.S. institutions of higher education, HBCUs in 2008 awarded 20% of the baccalaureate degrees earned by Blacks in science and engineering (National Science Foundation, 2011).

Details

Beyond Stock Stories and Folktales: African Americans' Paths to STEM Fields
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-168-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2011

Abstract

Details

Beyond Stock Stories and Folktales: African Americans' Paths to STEM Fields
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-168-8

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Kelly Mack, Claudia Rankins, Patrice McDermott and Orlando Taylor

More than 10 years after its founding, the STEM Women of Color Conclave® has emerged as the largest safe brave space in the United States for women faculty of color in the…

Abstract

More than 10 years after its founding, the STEM Women of Color Conclave® has emerged as the largest safe brave space in the United States for women faculty of color in the academic science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. Originally intended to be a national assembly, the Conclave® has evolved into a safe brave space that serves as a refuge for STEM women faculty of color who are regularly taxed with the struggle of having to navigate the unwelcoming, and often hostile, environments of the ivory tower in very unique ways. This chapter narrates how the Conclave's founding members journeyed toward creating and sustaining this safe brave space. The reader is awakened to deeper awareness of and sensitivities for the ways in which safe brave spaces must address both the complexities related to struggle – and liberation from that struggle – for both occupiers and observers of safe brave spaces. However, just as the quantum observer can disturb the system just by observing it and, ultimately, change or even nullify the results, we recognize that merely observing the Conclave® would nullify its intended purpose and, in the end, render it unsafe. Therefore, the reader can anticipate an absence of direct observations, reports of outcomes, or specific accounts of progress related to the occupiers of our safe brave space. Rather, the chapter offers an invitation to the reader to explore the authors' lived experiences as occupiers who designed a safe brave space. We invite the reader, particularly those who are also observers of safe brave spaces, to join us in protecting these valuable spaces.

Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Claudia J. Gollop and Sandra Hughes-Hassell

This chapter argues that despite efforts to increase the diversity of the library and information science profession, little has changed in the last four decades.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter argues that despite efforts to increase the diversity of the library and information science profession, little has changed in the last four decades.

Methodology/approach

This chapter presents historical and current data on diversity within the profession and examples of initiatives to improve diversity in schools of library and information science.

Findings

The chapter explores the ways in which the racial climate of the profession has impacted all of these efforts to improve diversity in the field.

Details

Celebrating the James Partridge Award: Essays Toward the Development of a More Diverse, Inclusive, and Equitable Field of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-933-9

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Abstract

Details

Re-conceptualizing Safe Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-250-6

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2018

Judith Müller-Maatsch, Johannes Jasny, Katharina Henn, Claudia Gras and Reinhold Carle

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the consumers’ perception of natural and artificial food colourants. Furthermore, attitudes towards the application of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the consumers’ perception of natural and artificial food colourants. Furthermore, attitudes towards the application of carmine, being technically important and ubiquitously used to impart red shades, are assessed and analysed. Originating from insects, carmine is considered as natural but may arouse disgust.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 625 individuals were surveyed using an online, self-administered questionnaire to represent a broad cross-section of the German population.

Findings

Independent of their origin, the application of colourants was rejected by 57.0 per cent of the interviewees. In total, 31.8 per cent of the participants stated a neutral attitude, while only 11.2 per cent expressed a positive notion. Most respondents preferred colourants from natural sources to artificial ones. While consumers perceive natural food colourants composed of genuine plant pigments positively, 61.6 per cent of respondents disliked the application of animal-derived colourants, 24.8 per cent of them did neither reject nor like it, and only 13.6 per cent of the interviewees stated a positive attitude towards them. The findings of this paper further indicate consumers’ preference for colourants to be either artificial or plant-derived rather than carmine. Food colourants are being rejected, possibly due to misleading information and confusing labelling. Consequently, information about carmine, including its origin and production, did not increase the aversion to products that are dyed with it, but increased their acceptance.

Originality/value

This study outlines consumer perception and attitudes towards food colourants. For the first time, the findings of this paper report the effect of revealing information about an additive, which initially aroused disgust, and its influence on consumer perception.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Aidan Rankin

300

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Andrea Bramberger and Kate Winter

This chapter introduces the purpose and structure of this edited volume, including why safe spaces are needed in educational settings, how to think about what makes a…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the purpose and structure of this edited volume, including why safe spaces are needed in educational settings, how to think about what makes a space safe for different individuals or groups, and aspects to consider in creating and maintaining safe spaces. It describes the two broad sections, the first of which comprises chapters that introduce the problem, context, need for safe spaces (Chapter 2), the broad conceptual frames supporting them (Chapter 3), and detail and deconstruct examples of various safe spaces created in diverse educational settings (Chapter 4). Chapters in Section II include aspects of the conceptual foundations and details about the purpose, development, and implementation processes, and outcomes of various efforts to create and/or maintain a safe space for education.

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Sara De Pelsmaeker, Joachim J. Schouteten, Xavier Gellynck, Claudia Delbaere, Nathalie De Clercq, Adrienn Hegyi, Tünde Kuti, Frédéric Depypere and Koen Dewettinck

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of anticipated emotions (AE) on behavioural intention and behaviour to consume filled chocolates and to give an…

1199

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of anticipated emotions (AE) on behavioural intention and behaviour to consume filled chocolates and to give an indication on the possible differences in consumer behaviour between two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was used to explain the consumption of chocolate. In this study, TPB is extended with a construct for AE.

Findings

A total of 859 consumers in Belgium and Hungary participated in the study and results showed that including AE increases the predicted variance of the TPB. Moreover, AE have a positive effect on the intention and the actual behaviour of consumers. Next, the study suggests that Belgian consumers are more influenced by their emotional and control beliefs and that Hungarian consumers are also driven by opinion of family and friends and some behavioural beliefs.

Practical implications

Overall, TPB can contribute to the understanding of behavioural intention and behaviour towards eating filled chocolate. Moreover, it can help to develop a marketing plan for specific consumer segments as it can identify influencing factors and consumer beliefs towards a product.

Originality/value

This is the first study that compares the fit of the TPB model with and without the construct of AE. The work contributes to the growing literature on emotions as it does not focus on emotions elicited during or after consumption, but explores if the AE also play a significant role in behaviour.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2003

David B Bills

Contemporary labor economics has a ready explanation for the role of job training in the labor market. The human capital framework pioneered by Becker (1962, 1993) and…

Abstract

Contemporary labor economics has a ready explanation for the role of job training in the labor market. The human capital framework pioneered by Becker (1962, 1993) and Mincer (1962) and now extended by many, many others sees training as an investment in productive capacity that benefits both workers and employers. Employers enhance the productivity of their firms by investing in the skills of their workers, and these productivity gains are passed on to workers in the form of higher wages. Key to all of this is the distinction between general and specific skill. According to the theory, employers will not pay for or provide general skills (i.e. those that are transferable and hence valuable to other employers), because they are averse to being “poached” by more high-wage employers. They will, however, invest in workplace-specific skills, which assure them a return on their training investments.

Details

The Sociology of Job Training
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-886-6

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