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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Godson Ayertei Tetteh

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the student’s class attendance and learning strategies that will influence Bloom et al. (1956) learning outcome or…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the student’s class attendance and learning strategies that will influence Bloom et al. (1956) learning outcome or performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from undergraduate students in their final year. Student identification number was subsequently matched to observe initial, final assessments and responses from questionnaire using parts of MSLQ (Pintrich et al., 1991). Hypotheses were tested, and data were analyzed using multiple regression analysis and multinomial logistic regression analysis.

Findings

Students’ learning strategies and class attendance are in fact related. Thus, class attendance, students’ study time and the mid-semester exams could explain more than 34.0 per cent of the variance. The results show that class attendance, mid-semester exams and study time had a significant positive influence on the learning outcome.

Research limitations/implications

This study used undergraduate students in a university in Ghana, and may not necessarily be applicable universally. Also, teachers’ expectancies were not controlled. Another potential limitation was that TQM was the only subject area used for this study.

Practical implications

This study will recommend teachers to work individually with students in setting appropriate goals for each exam and frequently offer feedback. The results may influence on-line teaching and the student’s role in teaching and learning in the class.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to literature by examining how the student’s learning strategies, class attendances, study time, gender, status (part time student or full time student) influence the learning outcome or performance. This paper findings will provide educators new ways to understand student behavior and to assist them in achieving learning success.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Astrid Schmulian and Stephen Coetzee

Other business education literature, particularly in the field of economics, has developed theories in respect of the reasons for non‐attendance of lectures and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Other business education literature, particularly in the field of economics, has developed theories in respect of the reasons for non‐attendance of lectures and the positive correlation between class attendance and academic performance. The aim of this paper is to determine the generalizability of these theories to a large accounting class in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a differentiated replication of the study by Paisey and Paisey, who provided initial evidence of the generalizability of these theories to a small accounting class in Scotland, employing a research questionnaire and the analysis of quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

The reasons given for the non‐attendance of lectures generally correspond with those previously reported. Certain differences that are identified are likely a result of specific country or economic factors. This study found a significant positive correlation between class attendance and academic performance; however, the correlation is low and not very meaningful. Further analysis reveals some difference between language groups suggesting that culture and ethnicity may have an effect on the relationship between class attendance and academic performance.

Originality/value

This paper raises questions as to the generalizability of prior research on class attendance and academic performance. The findings of this study suggest other factors, including students' economic, cultural and ethnic backgrounds, are likely to affect associations between class attendance and academic performance.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Pranab Kumar Pani and Pallavi Kishore

There is growing evidence that learning is faster, measurably better and more productive in a classroom setting when a student attends classes regularly. Each student…

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing evidence that learning is faster, measurably better and more productive in a classroom setting when a student attends classes regularly. Each student brings in his/her experience, skills, and unique learning styles to a class – thus a classroom environment can potentially create positive externalities through which a student can gain substantially from various strengths of his/her peers. However, students do remain absent from their classes for a variety of reasons. One of the measurable effects of regular non-attendance in a university class, where students from various cultures and regions interact, is the academic performance. The purpose of this paper is to determine if there is any potential causal link between absenteeism (attendance) and academic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were culled from the records of three batches of students in a British university campus in the Middle East. Quantile regression methods were used to establish the causal relationship between absenteeism and academic performance.

Findings

A quantile regression analysis reveals that absenteeism has negative impact on academic performance. This also suggests that low performers are worse affected by absenteeism as compared to the high performers.

Research limitations/implications

Inclusion of some other factors, such as study habits, additional hours spent on quantitative modules, student’s ethnicity background, particularly in the context of United Arab Emirates, could have emboldened the robustness of the study. Non-availability or paucity of this information, to some degree, has limited the conclusions of this study.

Originality/value

Proponents of mandatory attendance argue that there is a positive correlation between attendance and performance. But, one very important issue which gets overlooked is who actually benefits more by attending classes – are the shirkers who have a poor attendance record or the ones who are more sincere, more regular, and active participants in a class? This study uses quantile regression analysis to address this issue.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2016

Tom Downen and Becky Hyde

The purpose of the study is to examine the effects of “flipping the classroom” on student performance, evaluation, and attendance in managerial accounting principles.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine the effects of “flipping the classroom” on student performance, evaluation, and attendance in managerial accounting principles.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a crossed within-participants research design (each student experiencing both traditional instruction and simplified flipped instruction) allowing for control of individual differences between students; repeated-measures regression analysis for overall effects; quantile regression for performance-segregated effects.

Findings

Flipping the classroom resulted in significant performance improvement, particularly for lower performing students. Course evaluations indicate a few instructor-related ratings were lower for the flipped approach. Attendance was lower under the flipped approach for initial class meetings where the instructional manipulation occurred.

Research limitations/implications

The study design included a weak form of flipping. A stronger form of flipping with greater incentives for class preparation as well as lecture videos could have stronger results.

Practical implications

Flipping the classroom could be effective for application-oriented accounting courses, particularly for lower performing students.

Originality/value

This is one of very few studies on flipping providing evidence of effectiveness using a crossed within-participants research design.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-969-5

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2012

W. Bradford Wilcox, Andrew J. Cherlin, Jeremy E. Uecker and Matthew Messel

Purpose – We examine trends in religious attendance by educational group, with an emphasis on the “moderately educated”: individuals with a high school degree but not a…

Abstract

Purpose – We examine trends in religious attendance by educational group, with an emphasis on the “moderately educated”: individuals with a high school degree but not a four-year college degree.

Methodology – We conduct multivariate ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression models using data from the General Social Survey (from 1972 to 2010) and the National Survey of Family Growth (from 1982 to 2008).

Findings – We find that religious attendance among moderately educated whites has declined relative to attendance among college-educated whites. Economic characteristics, current and past family characteristics, and attitudes toward premarital sex, each explain part of this differential decline.

Implications – Religion is becoming increasingly deinstitutionalized among whites with moderate levels of education, which suggests further social marginalization of this group. Furthermore, trends in the labor force, American family life, and attitudes appear to have salient ramifications for organized religion. Sociologists of religion need to once again attend to social stratification in religious life.

Details

Religion, Work and Inequality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-347-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Randa Diab-Bahman, Abrar Al-Enzi, Wael Sharafeddine and Sapheya Aftimos

This paper aims to examine the correlation between academic performance and attendance of e-learning, away from the conventional classroom setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the correlation between academic performance and attendance of e-learning, away from the conventional classroom setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates the impact of attendance in the final grades of 389 undergraduate first- and second-year undergraduates taking Business Management classes online for the first time over the span of three consecutive academic semesters during an academic year.

Findings

The results show that there was a negative correlation between attendance and grades. However, splitting the results by year provided some insightful information as there was a difference between the relationships for first- and second-year students. Therefore, it can be concluded that both attendance and the year of the students did have a statistically significant influence on grades.

Originality/value

Although the impact of students' attendance on their academic performance has not been the subject of extensive research, especially in the field of Management studies and in an online delivery medium, it is likely to be of interest to academics and policymakers as the pandemic continues to make e-learning more popular.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

L.P. Steenkamp, R.S. Baard and B.L. Frick

Student success and attrition, especially in the first year, has received increasing attention both in South Africa and internationally. The purpose of this article is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Student success and attrition, especially in the first year, has received increasing attention both in South Africa and internationally. The purpose of this article is to explore peer tutoring as a possible approach to facilitate first‐year student success in Financial Accounting.

Design/methodology/approach

The perspectives of tutors and students attending tutor sessions (tutees) were investigated by means of questionnaires, which were complemented by an analysis of the tutees' performance in the subject compared with their participation in the tutor programme. Two cohorts of students (2008/2009) were included in the study.

Findings

The results suggest that the tutees experienced the tutor programme positively and were in favour of similar initiatives in their second year of study. The tutors thought the programme had beneficial consequences for tutees. Regular attendance of tutor sessions seemed to benefit at least some students, even though it is difficult to determine causality. English‐speaking students benefited from attending the tutor sessions.

Research limitations/implications

The results are not generalisable beyond the scope of the particular institution, but provide guidance for other institutions considering a similar intervention.

Originality/value

The implementation of a tutor programme entails investments in terms of both money and time. This paper considers the benefits derived from these investments, specifically in an Accounting and South African context.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Sarah Bryans Bongey, Gerald Cizadlo and Lynn Kalnbach

To explore the benefits, challenges, and impact of podcasting in higher education and also to provide educators with anecdotal and practical advice and information on how…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the benefits, challenges, and impact of podcasting in higher education and also to provide educators with anecdotal and practical advice and information on how to create and distribute podcasts.

Design/methodology/approach

In support of a traditional college course, a biology professor implemented podcasts to explore the value of coursecasting and its role in student learning. Direct observation, attendance counts, and server statistics supplement a survey that was distributed to 246 students involved in the project. Five survey questions focused on whether the podcasts affected the students' attendance of class, students' preferences for listening to and processing of lecture material, and students' perceptions of the academic impact associated with the podcast availability.

Findings

Taken together, the responses to the main questions from the survey and the student self‐reported comments strongly suggest that having podcast lectures available to students does not lead to large declines in class attendance. For the specific courses that were examined by this survey, students overwhelmingly preferred the actual lectures to the recorded podcasts. In addition, the large majority of students were using the podcasts to increase their understanding of material covered in specific lectures. All of these findings seem to indicate that students perceive the podcasts as really useful additional resources available to help them succeed in their courses rather than as a substitute for more traditional methods of learning.

Practical implications

In addition to research‐based findings on the podcasts' positive impact on the teaching and learning process, this paper provides practical, “how‐to” information on the creation of podcasts.

Originality/value

This study describes experiences and presents original research relating to the podcasting of college biology lectures. Research and observations respond to the question of whether podcasts detract from the educational process. For the prospective podcaster, this paper also shares specific methods, strategies, and how‐to information involved in the creation of an academic podcast.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2014

Bader Ahmed Abuid

In this paper a systematic and well-defined student participation assessment scheme for college courses is proposed. The scheme supports the involvement of students in a…

Abstract

In this paper a systematic and well-defined student participation assessment scheme for college courses is proposed. The scheme supports the involvement of students in a variety of areas of participation within and outside the classroom with the aim of improving their learning. The scheme addresses mostly the challenges related to the practicality of the structure and design of the assessment. It also addresses the subjectivity of grading student participations. Areas of participation are widened to allow the faculty more accurate information about the conduct of each individual student towards more objective assessment. In addition, it provides the faculty with the flexibility to select areas that best fit the learning outcomes, nature of the course, availability of time and resources, and class atmosphere. The proposed scheme is initiated and developed using feedback from the teaching staff of Nizwa College of Technology, (NCT) through a survey and open discussion. The results indicate that over two thirds of the surveyed staff show agreement with the concept of assessing participation and find the scheme design clear and systematic, while 82% of them perceive the scheme as effective in improving the motivation and learning of students.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Abram Walton, Scott Homan, Linda Naimi and Cynthia Tomovic

The purpose of this paper is to identify and measure the perceptions and attitudes of students regarding the classroom performance system (CPS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and measure the perceptions and attitudes of students regarding the classroom performance system (CPS).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews a range of recently published (1993‐2006) works on pedagogy and educational technology. A survey methodology was utilized to measure students’ perceptions and attitudes across 16 variables.

Findings

The paper provides aggregate results on each of the 16 variables and statistically significant differences between sub‐categories.

Research limitations/implications

Research was limited to a major US university campus that services a large cross‐section of students. Demographic implications and trends are discussed.

Practical implications

This study focused on identifying and measuring the perceptions and attitudes of students regarding a radio frequency, wireless audience response system called: CPS. Sixteen research questions and variables were measured in this study regarding students’ perceptions and attitudes towards CPS, learning and student–instructor interactions. Overall, the study found that students perceive CPS as having a positive effect on their increase in pre‐class preparation and attendance, and on their increase of overall attention and participation during class. A slight majority of students enjoy using CPS and perceive CPS to have a moderately positive effect on their ability to learn and self diagnose how they are performing in class. The implications of this study and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper is valuable to instructors who wish to reemploy active learning or Socratic Method type activities in the large lecture format classes.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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