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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Tamir Tsegaye and Stephen Flowerday

An electronic health record (EHR) enables clinicians to access and share patient information electronically and has the ultimate goal of improving the delivery of…

Abstract

Purpose

An electronic health record (EHR) enables clinicians to access and share patient information electronically and has the ultimate goal of improving the delivery of healthcare. However, this can create security and privacy risks to patient information. This paper aims to present a model for securing the EHR based on role-based access control (RBAC), attribute-based access control (ABAC) and the Clark-Wilson model.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted which resulted in the collection of secondary data that was used as the content analysis sample. Using the MAXQDA software program, the secondary data was analysed quantitatively using content analysis, resulting in 2,856 tags, which informed the discussion. An expert review was conducted to evaluate the proposed model using an evaluation framework.

Findings

The study found that a combination of RBAC, ABAC and the Clark-Wilson model may be used to secure the EHR. While RBAC is applicable to healthcare, as roles are linked to an organisation’s structure, its lack of dynamic authorisation is addressed by ABAC. Additionally, key concepts of the Clark-Wilson model such as well-formed transactions, authentication, separation of duties and auditing can be used to secure the EHR.

Originality/value

Although previous studies have been based on a combination of RBAC and ABAC, this study also uses key concepts of the Clark-Wilson model for securing the EHR. Countries implementing the EHR can use the model proposed by this study to help secure the EHR while also providing EHR access in a medical emergency.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Sophie Moore, Rebecca Wotus, Alyson Norman, Mark Holloway and Jackie Dean

Brain Injury Case Managers (BICMs) work closely with individuals with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI), assessing needs, structuring rehabilitation interventions and providing…

Abstract

Purpose

Brain Injury Case Managers (BICMs) work closely with individuals with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI), assessing needs, structuring rehabilitation interventions and providing support, and have significant experience of clients with impairments to decision making. The purpose of this paper is to explore the application of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) and its guidance when applied to ABI survivors. This research aimed to: first, highlight potential conflicts or tensions that application of the MCA might pose, and second, identify approaches to mitigate the problems of the MCA and capacity assessments with ABI survivors. It is hoped that this will support improvements in the services offered.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed method approach, 93 BICMs responded to an online questionnaire about decision making following ABI. Of these, 12 BICMs agreed to take part in a follow-up semi-structured telephone interview.

Findings

The data revealed four main themes: disagreements with other professionals, hidden disabilities, vulnerability in the community and implementation of the MCA and capacity assessments.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the need for changes to the way mental capacity assessments are conducted and the need for training for professionals in the hidden effects of ABI.

Originality/value

Limited research exists on potential limitations of the application of the MCA for individuals with an ABI. This paper provides much needed research on the difficulties surrounding mental capacity and ABI.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Robert T. Rosti and Frank Shipper

Training programs are infrequently evaluated and when they are evaluated they often rely on pre‐experimental designs and feedback of the participants. This statement is…

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Abstract

Training programs are infrequently evaluated and when they are evaluated they often rely on pre‐experimental designs and feedback of the participants. This statement is also true of management development programs based on 360 feedback. In this study the effects of a training program administered with 360 feedback are evaluated using pre‐ and post‐observations of the participants’ managerial skills in control and experimental groups. The results indicate that changes in individual skills could not be contributed to the training program, but that changes in the overall profiles of skills could. Why this could occur is discussed as well as suggestions for improving training evaluation.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 13 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2015

Stephen Sweet, Jacquelyn Boone James and Marcie Pitt-Catsouphes

Increased access to flexible work arrangements has the prospect of enhancing work-family reconciliation. Under consideration is extent that managers assumed lead roles in…

Abstract

Purpose

Increased access to flexible work arrangements has the prospect of enhancing work-family reconciliation. Under consideration is extent that managers assumed lead roles in initiating discussions, the overall volume of discussions that occurred, and the outcomes of these discussions.

Methodology/approach

A panel analysis of 950 managers over one and a half years examines factors predicting involvement in a change initiative designed to expand flexible work arrangement use in a company in the financial activities supersector.

Findings

The overall volume of discussions, and tendencies for managers to initiate discussions, is positively predicted by managers’ prior experiences with flexibility, training to promote flexibility, and supervisory responsibilities. Managers were more inclined to promote flexibility when they viewed it as a supervisory responsibility and when they believed that it offered career rewards. An experiment demonstrated that learning of professional standards demonstrated outside of one’s own unit increased promotion of flexible work options. Discussions of flexibility led to many more approvals than denials of use, and also increased the likelihood of subsequent discussions occurring, indicating that promoting discussions of flexible work arrangements can be a path toward expanding use.

Originality

The study identifies specific factors that can lead managers to support exploration of flexible work arrangement use.

Details

Work and Family in the New Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-630-0

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2016

Tarmo Kadak and Erkki K. Laitinen

The assessment of the success of Performance Management Systems (PMS) is difficult because there are many success factors, they are mutually dependent on each other, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The assessment of the success of Performance Management Systems (PMS) is difficult because there are many success factors, they are mutually dependent on each other, and located at different hierarchical levels of an organization. Therefore, there is a need to describe the complete logical chain, which makes PMS successful for an organization and to find out a comprehensive list of key factors (KF) affecting the success of PMS. The objective of this research paper is to develop a method to assess success of a PMS based on a logical chain of 14 KF.

Methodology/approach

The research first develops a logical chain based on the 14 KFs on the basis of prior studies and then carries out a survey about these KFs (15 check points) of PMS and their connection to organizational performance for a small sample of firms from two EU countries.

Findings

There are next findings of this study which indicate following: KFs of PMS affect organizational performance; successful PMS improves organizational performance; PMS is successful for the organization when the completeness of the logical chain in PMS is high.

Practical implications

The practical contribution of this study is that findings show that firms can assess their own PMSs and compare their check point values against the values of successful PMS group. This kind of analysis indicates directly improvement potential for the different check points in PMS.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Contemporary Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-915-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

C. Bryan Foltz

The term cyberterrorism is being used with increasing frequency today. Since widespread concern with cyberterrorism is relatively new, understanding of the term is…

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6705

Abstract

The term cyberterrorism is being used with increasing frequency today. Since widespread concern with cyberterrorism is relatively new, understanding of the term is somewhat limited. Government officials and experts are often heard claiming that the world is unprepared for cyberterrorism; however, other officials and experts state that cyberterrorism does not pose a threat to anyone. Examines the reasons for these disparate viewpoints and reviews the theoretical and actual forms in which cyberterrorism may occur. Further, proposes the use (and refocusing) of an existing model of computer security to help understand and defend against cyberterrorism.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Frank Shipper, Joel Kincaid, Denise M. Rotondo and Richard C. Hoffman

Multinationals increasingly require a cadre of skilled managers to effectively run their global operations. This exploratory study examines the relationship between…

Abstract

Multinationals increasingly require a cadre of skilled managers to effectively run their global operations. This exploratory study examines the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and managerial effectiveness among three cultures. EI is conceptualized and measured as self‐other agreement concerning the use of managerial skills using data gathered under a 360‐degree feedback process. Three hypotheses relating to managerial self‐awareness of both interactive and controlling skills are examined using data from 3,785 managers of a multinational firm located in the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), and Malaysia. The two sets of managerial skills examined were found to be stable across the three national samples. The hypotheses were tested using polynomial regressions, and contour plots were developed to aid interpretation. Support was found for positive relationships between effectiveness and EI (self‐awareness). This relationship was supported for interactive skills in the US and UK samples and for controlling skills in the Malaysian and UK samples. Self‐awareness of different managerial skills varied by culture. It appears that in low power distance (PD) cultures such as the United States and United Kingdom, self‐awareness of interactive skills may be crucial relative to effectiveness whereas in high PD cultures, such as Malaysia self‐awareness of controlling skills may be crucial relative to effectiveness. These findings are discussed along with the implications for future research.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Lam‐for Kwok

States that traditional information security models address only the micro view of how to maintain a secure environment by controlling the flows of information within…

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1030

Abstract

States that traditional information security models address only the micro view of how to maintain a secure environment by controlling the flows of information within protection systems and the access to controlled data items. Argues that these models do not aim to, and cannot, reflect the information security level of an organization. Describes an information security model using a hypertext approach. The model aims to prepare a macro view of the current information security situation in order to provide an overview of the information security risk to a wider audience in an organization. An administrative information system has been analysed to demonstrate the hypertext information security model.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Charles Cresson Wood

Presents a policy considered necessary to prevent breaches of security when software is moved from development to production. Contends that although information is a…

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333

Abstract

Presents a policy considered necessary to prevent breaches of security when software is moved from development to production. Contends that although information is a valuable, global commodity it is often unprotected. Presents suggestions to prevent encryption code from being broken. Gives guidelines for the security of encryption keys. Looks at the costs and benefits of encryption, packet encryption and the Internet. Discusses US policy, the US Computer Security Act and the US government proposals for information security

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Huiru Yang, Delia Vazquez and Marta Blazquez

The competitive luxury market raises higher requirements for luxury brands to effectively involve young generations in creating and endowing meanings to products, services…

Abstract

The competitive luxury market raises higher requirements for luxury brands to effectively involve young generations in creating and endowing meanings to products, services and experiences. Several researchers suggest that art experiences create a fertile source of co-creation practices for cultural customers as they could engage in cognitive, emotional and imaginal activities to endowing meanings to products or services. Hence, bridging art and luxury is of significance for luxury brands to create value and engage their customers. This chapter delivers the essence of value for luxury brands and their customers and focusses on how luxury brands deploy art-based initiatives as a favourable technique in which value co-creation takes place.

Details

Creativity and Marketing: The Fuel for Success
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-330-7

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