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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2019

John L. Taylor and Ian Thorne

People with intellectual disabilities who set fires are a heterogeneous and clinically complex group who present significant challenges to the wider community and to…

Abstract

Purpose

People with intellectual disabilities who set fires are a heterogeneous and clinically complex group who present significant challenges to the wider community and to forensic practitioners working in forensic mental health and correctional settings. There is little available in the literature to support professionals when considering assessment and formulation for clients exhibiting these perturbing behaviours. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper the materials available to assist forensic practitioners in considering assessment and formulation of people with intellectual disabilities who set fires are described and outlined.

Findings

An assessment scheme is proposed for organising information from a variety of sources to assist professionals in understanding the nature of risks and clinical needs of firesetters with intellectual disabilities. A newly revised risk assessment measure designed for this population is provided.

Practical implications

Forensic practitioners are provided with a framework and tools to assist with their assessment and formulation of firesetters with intellectual disabilities.

Originality/value

This is the first time a newly revised risk assessment for firesetting behaviour by people with intellectual disabilities has been presented.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Guy Daly, Annette Roebuck, Jennifer Dean, Fiona Goff, Martin Bollard and Clare Taylor

This article presents the findings of an evaluation of the impact on service users of a local authority's individual budgets pilot. The local authority has pursued an…

Abstract

This article presents the findings of an evaluation of the impact on service users of a local authority's individual budgets pilot. The local authority has pursued an outcomes‐focused approach to care planning. The research findings suggest that these service users and their families see individual budgets as a very positive development. Service users have been able to gain greater control over their lives, not least in that they are able to determine to a much greater extent how they have their needs met. This facilitates service users' general growth and development, such that they are able to engage more fully and on a more equal footing as part of their families and communities. However, there remain a number of challenges that need to be addressed if individual budgets, or personal budgets generally, are to be rolled out successfully across adult social and health care.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Patricia A. Maguire and Muzaffer Uysal

Crompton (1979) has stated that the raison d'être of leisure service delivery Systems is to ensure that adequate opportunities exist through the provision of recreation…

Abstract

Crompton (1979) has stated that the raison d'être of leisure service delivery Systems is to ensure that adequate opportunities exist through the provision of recreation activities and programs for members of the community to enjoy. It is not important who provides these opportunities as long as they are provided at an equitable price. This may be true in the abstract, however, in the U.S.A. today, like most western nations, there is a mixed economy in which public and private sectors co‐exist, co‐operate and compete in recreation/tourism development. Today, there are many issues and much controversy regarding the appropriate roles which should be taken by public and private suppliers of tourism/recreation.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Tina McGrath

Abstract

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1964

IN The verdict of you all, Rupert Croft‐Cooke has some uncomplimentary things to say about novel readers as a class, which is at least an unusual look at his public by a…

Abstract

IN The verdict of you all, Rupert Croft‐Cooke has some uncomplimentary things to say about novel readers as a class, which is at least an unusual look at his public by a practitioner whose income for many years was provided by those he denigrates.

Details

New Library World, vol. 65 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2010

John Taylor and William Lindsay

De‐institutionalisation and resettlement have had a significant impact on offenders with learning disabilities (LD) who are now more visible in the wider community than…

Abstract

De‐institutionalisation and resettlement have had a significant impact on offenders with learning disabilities (LD) who are now more visible in the wider community than before. Perhaps because of the challenges presented by people who were previously contained in institutions, there has been a growth of interest in their characteristics, the services and clinical interventions required to support them.This narrative review presents and discusses recent developments concerning offenders with LD. It looks at the historical association between crime and low intelligence, and then examines the evidence concerning the prevalence of offending by people with LD and recidivism rates. Recent research concerning service pathways for this population is summarised and progress in the development of actuarial, dynamic and clinical assessments of the future risk of offending is outlined.The second half of the paper focuses on a review of the evidence for and recent developments in the treatment of offending behaviour (anger/aggression, sexual offending and fire‐setting), utilising broadly cognitive behaviourally‐based approaches. Finally, future directions for research and practice innovation are proposed.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2018

Lawrence Patterson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on the paper “Specialist community teams for adults with learning disabilities: referrals to a countywide service in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on the paper “Specialist community teams for adults with learning disabilities: referrals to a countywide service in England” by Isabel Clare and colleagues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews some themes presented in this paper relating to the practice and management of community teams for adults with learning disability within the context of recent national service initiatives.

Findings

There is a limited literature on the practice, purpose and service caseload management of community teams. Taken in the context of recent national service initiatives, the paper by Clare et al. illustrates the gaps between the way community teams are currently processing demands and how these services will likely need to behave in future.

Originality/value

There is little recent literature examining the purpose of, and management approaches in, community teams and this addition should stimulate some further consideration of how community teams need to adjust to meet changing demands.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2009

Julia Kelly, Alasdair Goodwill, Nick Keene and Su Thrift

This pilot study investigated three historical risk factors for pathological arson identified in Jackson's Only Viable Option theory (Jackson, 1994), which views the act…

Abstract

This pilot study investigated three historical risk factors for pathological arson identified in Jackson's Only Viable Option theory (Jackson, 1994), which views the act as an adaptive response to circumstances that are difficult to tolerate and which the individual does not have the necessary skills to resolve by appropriate means. Twenty men with mild learning disabilities were recruited from inpatient forensic services. It was hypothesised that there would be a greater incidence of risk factors among individuals with an index offence of arson than those without, and that risk factors would significantly predict an index offence of arson. Significant differences were found between the groups for perceived inability to effect social change and childhood experiences of fire, but not for the family problems under investigation. However, the sample size was too small to draw reliable conclusions on the predictive ability of the risk factors. The findings suggest that perceived inability to effect social change and childhood experiences of fire are risk factors characteristic of men with learning disabilities who have set fires, lending support to elements of Jackson's theory and providing opportunities to develop evidence‐based practice. However, the underlying causes of these risk‐factor characteristics remain unclear. It is hoped that the present study will help inform the choice of risk factors under investigation and improve the design of a larger study.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Clare Sarah Allely and Lino Faccini

The area of trauma in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is an important area given the substantial rates of abuse endured by these individuals. However, there are issues…

Abstract

Purpose

The area of trauma in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is an important area given the substantial rates of abuse endured by these individuals. However, there are issues with the identification of trauma, understanding how it is perceived, and manifested. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The limited research regarding trauma in ASD is reviewed and gaps are identified.

Findings

The key findings from the relevant literature are discussed.

Practical implications

Practical suggestions are outlined for more effective identification of trauma in individuals with ASD.

Originality/value

To date, there has been relatively little research on trauma and ASD. This paper emphasises the urgent need for attention in this area.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Kevin Doughty, Andrew Monk, Carole Bayliss, Sian Brown, Lena Dewsbury, Barbara Dunk, Vance Gallagher, Kathy Grafham, Martin Jones, Charles Lowe, Lynne McAlister, Kevin McSorley, Pam Mills, Clare Skidmore, Aileen Stewart, Barbara Taylor and David Ward

The development of telecare services across the UK has been supported by grants from the respective governments of Scotland and Wales, and by the DH in England. New…

Abstract

The development of telecare services across the UK has been supported by grants from the respective governments of Scotland and Wales, and by the DH in England. New services are being established to sometimes operate alongside existing community equipment services and community alarm services. Elsewhere they are embracing a wider range of services including rehabilitation, intermediate care and health services designed to reduce the use of unscheduled care services. This paper discusses the difficulties in understanding the scope of telecare services, and the definitions of services that will need to be confirmed so that service users can choose appropriately if offered direct payments. Two different service models are offered, one of which uses telehealth as an umbrella term to cover all telecare, e‐care and m‐care, and telemedicine where the former includes all such services offered in the service user's home, including those of a medical nature. The second model views telecare alongside assistive technologies and telemedicine as one of three different technology groups designed to make people more independent or to bring care closer to home. There is significant overlap between the three groups, which justifies the introduction of a new term ‐ ARTS (assistive and remote technology services) ‐ to describe this area of support.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

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