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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Clare Rigg and Kiran Trehan

Understanding of HRD in SMEs has frequently been based on impoverished research resulting from underdeveloped theory. This article argues for the potential offered to…

1472

Abstract

Understanding of HRD in SMEs has frequently been based on impoverished research resulting from underdeveloped theory. This article argues for the potential offered to researching, understanding and practising HRD in small organisations, of taking a discourse perspective on organisation, learning and development. Through a comparative interpretation, from a traditional and a discourse perspective on HRD, of research material collected ethnographically in three small companies, the article aims to contribute to an approach which can deepen understanding of HRD in SMEs by combining three strands that have not generally been integrated: ideas from recent debates on what HRD comprises, perspectives on learning, and a discourse perspective on organisation. The implications for research indicate a need for methods that enable the study of HRD in action – the micro‐processes of development.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 44 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Clare Rigg and Kiran Trehan

The intentions of this article are to contribute reflections of an empirical account of working with critical reflection within an organisational development programme…

7460

Abstract

Purpose

The intentions of this article are to contribute reflections of an empirical account of working with critical reflection within an organisational development programme, addressing the following questions: What space is there for critical reflection in organisational development? What issues are raised for in‐company developers and providers by advocating critical reflection in organisation practice?

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is taken, presenting an empirical account of a management and organisational development programme that integrated action learning and critical reflection.

Findings

The account illustrates difficulties of employing critical reflection within the workplace arising from the more complex power relations between the multiple stakeholders in a commercial context. In particular, dissonance provoked by critical reflection confronts the client with a tension over whether to see organisation members primarily as customers to please or as participants in a change process which inevitably will disrupt.

Practical implications

In making sense of the perspectives of different stakeholders a model is presented to help practitioners in development of this kind to anticipate potential issues.

Originality/value

The paper presents a rare account of employing critical reflection in a work organisation development programme.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Kiran Trehan, Clare Rigg and Jim Stewart

387

Abstract

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 28 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Clare Rigg, Kiran Trehan and Jim Stewart

2101

Abstract

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Kiran Trehan and Clare Rigg

This paper aims to advance theoretical understanding of the concept of “critical human resource development”.

2558

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance theoretical understanding of the concept of “critical human resource development”.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper.

Findings

Foregrounding questions of power, emotions and political dynamics within the analysis of organisational learning and development activity, critical approaches in HRD pay particular attention to the importance of context, interests and patterns of inter‐relationships amongst organisation stakeholders. It is notable that much of the work in this area operates on a theoretical plane, and is often light on practical guidance or recognition of the distinctive contexts of HRD practice, compared to other areas of critical learning.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical investigations that have systematically applied critical approaches to HRD are in short supply, and their potential to enrich HRD practice has rarely been explored. This paper contributes to addressing these gaps.

Originality/value

Firstly, it elucidates the concept of critical HRD through illuminating the diversity of theoretical perspectives; secondly, it demonstrate some of the intricacies and discrepancies within current theorising on critical HRD; thirdly, it raises questions for the practical significance of tools and insights informed by critical HRD.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2012

David Coghlan and Clare Rigg

Action learning is a term that is used with a wide range of meanings: from an equivalent term for experiential learning to a philosophy of learning. This chapter takes the…

Abstract

Action learning is a term that is used with a wide range of meanings: from an equivalent term for experiential learning to a philosophy of learning. This chapter takes the latter position and focuses on action learning as a scholarly activity. The chapter has two main sections. In the first part the breadth and depth of action learning is introduced: its variations and applications are discussed. The second part explores how action learning is at the cutting edge of engaging practitioners in real change and at the development of scholar–practitioners and actionable knowledge of how organizations change, how it offers a modality of an action-oriented approach to inquiry that accords with contemporary paradigms of useful and relevant research, its contribution to organization and management theory comes through how critical action learning engages with issues of power and social relations and through its critique of management education.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-807-6

Book part
Publication date: 20 August 2016

Paul Coughlan, David Coghlan, Denise O’Leary, Clare Rigg and Doireann Barrett

The chapter describes and reflects upon an EU-funded research initiative, TRADEIT, which has attempted to develop a learning network among European traditional food…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter describes and reflects upon an EU-funded research initiative, TRADEIT, which has attempted to develop a learning network among European traditional food producers as one way of contributing to the economic sustainability of the ventures, the social sustainability of the food’s regional character and the environmental sustainability of food production through the use of traditional methods.

Methodology/approach

The chapter describes TRADEIT before moving on to an exploration of learning in organizations and networks. It outlines the action learning research methodology developed and implemented to explore the development of a learning network in TRADEIT. A single case history is presented to illustrate the engagement of a small food producer in the network.

Findings

The discussion reflects on the application of action learning in supporting sustainability evident in TRADEIT.

Originality/value

The chapter focuses on the application of action learning in the development of a learning network among traditional food producers across Europe.

Details

Organizing Supply Chain Processes for Sustainable Innovation in the Agri-Food Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-488-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Elaine Swan

The purpose of this paper is to ask how we can think about critical reflection as a pedagogical practice given the “confessional turn”. By the “confessional turn” the…

3008

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ask how we can think about critical reflection as a pedagogical practice given the “confessional turn”. By the “confessional turn” the author refers to the idea that “subjective, autobiographical and confessional modes of expression” have expanded exponentially across a wide range of social spheres, including education, the legal system, the media and the workplace. Examining these developments, this paper asks what these debates on critical reflection and confession mean for pedagogical practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The main approach is a review of key debates in the literature on critical reflection and also in the wider social sciences.

Findings

The discussion compares different debates. Thus it shows that for critics, the turn to the “first person” technologies is narcissistic, psychologistic and de‐politicising. On this view, critical reflective practice might be understood as an individualistic and individualising pedagogy in spite of its claims to be critical. The paper discusses how in contrast, others see this move to talk about the subjective and the self as an extension of the feminist project of the personal is political – i.e. that personal stories, feelings and issues have social and political roots and consequences. For them, reflection can be critical, leading to political consciousness‐raising, i.e. a new awareness about social, political and personal processes. It finishes by examining the view that the idea of reflexivity might help us out of the conflict between these debates.

Practical implications

The paper poses a number of questions in relation to critical reflection that can be taken up by practitioners in the field.

Originality/value of paper

The paper brings new literature to bear on the practice of critical reflection and raises important questions relevant to academics and practitioners.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Clare Rigg

135

Abstract

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Helen Francis and John Cowan

This paper seeks to explore changes taking place in a curriculum design for postgraduate teaching in personnel and development, aimed at enhancing lifelong learning. A…

2417

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore changes taking place in a curriculum design for postgraduate teaching in personnel and development, aimed at enhancing lifelong learning. A scheme is described which aims to improve the alignment for professional development of students, in ways that facilitate critically reflective practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on their personal experiences as a programme leader (Master's in HRM) and an educational consultant to describe their strategy for critically reflective continuous professional development (CPD). In doing so, their practice is related to some of the theories underlying critical reflection, and the key challenges in seeking to engage student practitioners in professional development of this kind are drawn out.

Findings

It is argued that achieving an alignment between the development and assessment of student capabilities is vital to the development of critical reflection, and it is explained how the strategy presented for CPD supports self‐management of this process.

Practical implications

Although the paper is grounded in the authors' particular experiences and structure for student support, it is hoped that reflections on these can be of general value to those interested in developing critically reflective practice amongst students which is both effective and practical in the increasingly demanding world of higher education.

Originality/value

The self‐managed process explored in the paper is framed by a social approach to learning that places peer interaction at the forefront of the learning processes involved.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

1 – 10 of 38