Search results

1 – 3 of 3
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Clara R.B. Oguntona, Monsurat Apoyin and Anne‐Marie Olateju

The food and nutrient intake of 250 (135 male, 115 female) adolescent Nigerian high school students have been surveyed to determine the contributions of different food…

Abstract

The food and nutrient intake of 250 (135 male, 115 female) adolescent Nigerian high school students have been surveyed to determine the contributions of different food groups to their intakes of protein, calcium and iron. Twenty‐four‐hour dietary recall technique was used to obtain details of food intake and questionnaires administered to obtain social and economic circumstances of subjects’ family. Male subjects had more energy, protein, calcium and iron intake but no significant (p < 0.05) differences when compared with females. Cereal based foods were the most important sources of dietary protein, supplying between 40‐52 per cent for all subjects and 60 per cent or more for 29 per cent of the subjects. Proportions of dietary protein from legumes, meats, vegetables and roots ranged from10‐21 per cent, 3‐13 per cent, 7‐17 per cent, 6.5‐12.9 per cent respectively. Cereals were also the most important source of dietary calcium (56.8 per cent) and iron (33.16 per cent) for most subjects. The contribution of meats and legumes however, approximate that of cereals for 36 per cent of subjects. Apart from gender, residence at home or in boarding house and the socio‐economic status of the subject’s family significantly affect the sources of dietary protein, calcium and iron.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Wasiu A.O. Afolabi, Clara R.B. Oguntona and Bilkisu B. Fakunmoju

Reports a study to determine the suitability of beniseed for bread making as well as the chemical composition and acceptability of the bread among Nigerian bread consuming…

Abstract

Reports a study to determine the suitability of beniseed for bread making as well as the chemical composition and acceptability of the bread among Nigerian bread consuming population. Three bread samples were developed from wheat, beniseed, and cassava composite flour using the formulae 85:10:5, 80:15:5 and 75:25:5. Baking characteristics, chemical composition and acceptability tests were carried out on the samples with wheat bread serving as control. Results show that bread produced from beniseed composite flour has similar baking characteristics in terms of appearance, colour and flavour when compared with wheat bread. Consumer acceptability tests indicated that the bread samples were all acceptable, with the sample with formula 85:10:5 ranked first and being the most preferred. Analysis of chemical composition indicated that the bread samples contain higher protein, fat, crude fibre and ash. This study has shown that acceptable bread of higher nutritional value can be produced from beniseed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Clara R.B. Oguntona, Justina A. Odunmbaku and Bolanle O. Ottun

The objectives of the study are the standardization of ten Nigerian dishes and the determination of their proximate composition. Recipes for the ten dishes were obtained…

Abstract

The objectives of the study are the standardization of ten Nigerian dishes and the determination of their proximate composition. Recipes for the ten dishes were obtained through the use of questionnaires. There were 200 respondents to the questionnaires consisting of housewives living in the major towns of south‐western Nigeria. One recipe for each meal was extracted from a known cookery book. The means for each ingredient of all the dishes were calculated from ten randomly selected recipes and then used in the preparation of the standardized dishes. The standardized dishes are: Burabisko, Jollof rice, Agbono soup, Stewed beans and fried plantain, Bean pudding, Melon seed and vegetable soup, Ikokore, Eba imoyo, Yam and eggs and Yam pottage. Consumer acceptability tests were conducted as well as proximate analyses according to AOAC. All dishes were considered acceptable since they scored more than 3, the benchmark for acceptability. Energy content of the dishes ranged from 281Kcal/100g (Jollof rice) to 510Kcal/100g (Agbono soup). The crude protein content ranged from 7.5g/100g for Burabisko to 27.4g/100g for Jollof rice. The results suggest that these dishes are good sources of energy and protein.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3