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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Jennifer de Vries, Claire Webb and Joan Eveline

There is considerable literature about the impact of mentoring on the mentees but little is known about the effect of the mentoring relationship on the mentor. This paper…

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Abstract

Purpose

There is considerable literature about the impact of mentoring on the mentees but little is known about the effect of the mentoring relationship on the mentor. This paper aims to address that gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with 15 mentors and survey responses from 128 mentees are used to examine a formal mentoring programme. Most emphasis is on the perspective of the mentors, raising questions about how they view outcomes for themselves and their mentees, as well as the effects of mentoring on the workplace culture over time. Questions about the mentoring relationship, including gender differences, are analysed against the background of a decade‐long organisational change strategy.

Findings

Mentors report significant benefits for themselves and the mentee as well as the organisation itself as a result of their participation. The findings suggest that a long‐term mentoring programme for women has the potential to be an effective organisational change intervention. In particular, men involved in that programme increased their understanding and sensitivity regarding gendering processes in the workplace.

Practical implications

The importance of the impact of mentoring programmes on the mentors is an under‐investigated area. This study suggests that programme design, together with careful selection and targeting of mentors, enables mentoring to become a critical part of a culture change strategy.

Originality/value

The paper assists academics and practitioners to conceive of mentoring as a core element in an effective organisational change intervention. The innovation is to move mentoring away from assuming a deficit model of the mentee. As this programme shows, a focus on what needs to change in the dominant organisational culture, practices and values can lead to key players in the organisation becoming actively involved in the needed change process.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-758-6

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2009

Deborah Klée

Telford and Wrekin Council and PCT have developed a Health and Well‐being Strategy that includes all health and council services that contribute to this area, including…

Abstract

Telford and Wrekin Council and PCT have developed a Health and Well‐being Strategy that includes all health and council services that contribute to this area, including secondary health care. This article describes the challenges that they faced in understanding and agreeing shared priorities and how they used this whole‐systems framework to keep a clear focus on what local people want and need, bringing together and making sense of national policy such as World Class Commissioning and Putting People First.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Kathryn Thory

This chapter explores women leaders’ outward appearance in the male-dominated world of rail, through the lenses of postfeminism and neoliberalism. Drawing on 31 interviews

Abstract

This chapter explores women leaders’ outward appearance in the male-dominated world of rail, through the lenses of postfeminism and neoliberalism. Drawing on 31 interviews with women leaders in rail, it maps how a postfeminist logic is evident in women leaders’ narratives of aesthetic femininity. Aesthetic femininity refers to women leaders’ outward appearance which they describe as feminine. The research participants justify their feminine ‘work style’ through postfeminist themes of individual choice, natural sex differences, irony, personal initiative, skill and empowerment. The findings also show a patterning of justification around aesthetic femininity that fits a neoliberal self-governance as enterprise, self-flexibility and self-confidence. It is argued that whilst these iterations of aesthetic femininity are rooted in postfeminist and neoliberal contexts, they have consequences for sustaining gendered inequalities and traditional feminine norms in the highly masculinised culture of rail. Women’s narratives, whereby gender inequalities are acknowledged then subsumed into individualised agency through dress and appearance, do little to challenge the gendered culture in this sector.

Details

Women, Work and Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-670-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Christine Connolly

Aims to discover the different technologies used in warehouse stock control.

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Abstract

Purpose

Aims to discover the different technologies used in warehouse stock control.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a review of optical and radio‐frequency product‐labelling technologies, and then examines various devices and systems for reading these labels and integrating stock control into back‐office databases. It then looks at techniques for finding the goods within the warehouse, from simple address labels to radar positioning and inertial navigation, considering both operator‐based and guided vehicle handling systems.

Findings

Labelling technologies facilitate automatic product identification. Rugged handheld computers with wireless communications give real‐time capability and integrate stock control into wider software systems for efficient resource management. Speech synthesis provides one man‐machine interface enabling workers to order‐pick under database control. Automated readers record products entering and leaving the warehouse, theoretically removing the need for stock taking. Automatic guided vehicles are now available to stack and retrieve goods in the warehouse.

Originality/value

Provides engineers with an overview of the diversity of solutions employed in warehouse stock handling.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Claire Seaman and Ronald McQuaid

This paper considers the multiple social networks of small family businesses and the dynamic interactions between them. It analyses family, friendship and business…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper considers the multiple social networks of small family businesses and the dynamic interactions between them. It analyses family, friendship and business networks and the way additional ties within the networks become visible when they are considered together rather than separately.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews of thirteen family-owned and managed businesses are used to establish the patterns of networking. A detailed case study is then presented, allowing a deeper qualitative analysis of the interaction of different types of networks.

Findings

The findings explore multiple rationalities employed in the networking of family businesses and how different aspects of their individual family, friendship and business networks contribute to business development.

Research limitations/implications

The paper suggests that a multi-rational theoretical perspective of the family, rather than a solely business-related perspective, deepens the understanding of the dynamics of family businesses behavior and that different types of businesses may be influenced to varying degrees by different rationalities.

Practical implications

Business networking tends to be deliberately encouraged by business support agencies, often via the deliberate development of events. A deeper understanding of the manner in which small businesses use and develop networks would enhance the direction and effectiveness of such investment.

Social implications

Family businesses, especially micro- small- and SME businesses, are often integral to the communities in which they are based. By viewing family businesses within their social space, we acknowledge the importance of the community around them and the integrated nature of family, business and community in rural areas.

Originality/value

The value of this research lies in the proposition that smaller businesses in rural areas are often surrounded by the inter-woven networks of family, business and community.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Claire Connolly Knox, Daniel Linskey and Jenna Tyler

The theory and practice of emergency management and homeland security continues to evolve. Specifically, public safety professionals must adopt an all-hazards approach to…

Abstract

The theory and practice of emergency management and homeland security continues to evolve. Specifically, public safety professionals must adopt an all-hazards approach to managing disasters and emergencies, and the creation of a safe and resilient nation is not solely the responsibility of the public safety community. Rather, it is the responsibility of the whole community. Using the Boston Marathon Bombing of 2015 as a case study, this chapter examines the extent to which law enforcement officers have embraced Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)’s concept of creating a culture of preparedness. In doing so, it reviews after-action reports from the incident to identify areas contributing to creating this culture as well as potential gaps and lessons learned. This chapter concludes with a set of recommendations for building and sustaining a culture of preparedness moving forward.

Details

The Role of Law Enforcement in Emergency Management and Homeland Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-336-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Michael Hess

There is now considerable evidence that “community unionism” is emerging as a new form of worker organization in many quite different national contexts. This paper aims to…

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Abstract

Purpose

There is now considerable evidence that “community unionism” is emerging as a new form of worker organization in many quite different national contexts. This paper aims to look at the conceptual underpinnings of the relationship between ideas about community and union organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is particularly concerned with the impact “community” in two types of national context might have when it is applied to union organization. The contrast provides an interesting demonstration of the relationship between organisational change and contextual specificities.

Findings

In the western market‐oriented democracies of first world nations, community unionism may be seen as part of a broader (re‐)discovery of the power of community factors in these highly individualistic societies. In third world nations pursuing accelerated economic growth and social development “community” finds expression in communal loyalties based on localised social relations.

Originality/value

This paper considers differences in how “community” impacts on unionism differ in these varied historical contexts.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Persistence and Vigilance: A View of Ford Motor Company’s Accounting over its First Fifty Years
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-998-9

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

465

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

1 – 10 of 62