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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Bernie Quinn and Claire Seaman

This paper aims to draw together three strands of work currently being carried out at Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh to take an overview of food in Scotland and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to draw together three strands of work currently being carried out at Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh to take an overview of food in Scotland and on-going local interventions. The provision of “artisan” food, defined here as food that forms part of the established tradition of its local area, usually produced on a relatively small scale, has become prominent in Scotland in recent years and is seen by many as part of a developing food culture that begins to address the Scottish food paradox.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of current research that considers artisanal food production and work that researches small and family enterprises was undertaken.

Findings

Small business support within the UK and indeed tailored support for businesses owned and managed by families is in a developmental phase at present. While there are numerous sources from which businesses can seek support, there are also acknowledged challenges for businesses in identifying the most appropriate sources of support, and the opportunity cost of engaging with business support agencies remains a serious concern for many. Further, much business support prioritises high-growth businesses, effectively de-prioritizing artisanal food producers.

Research limitations/implications

The development and promotion of appropriate business support systems tailored to artisanal food production is an area that would merit further development.

Originality/value

The value of this piece lies in its blending of two distinct areas of work, considering both the challenges faced by artisanal food producers and recent research in family and smaller enterprises.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Leei John, Marc Robertson, Kate Tetley and Claire Seaman

This paper considers a country context where traditional entrepreneurship has not been a major part of the economy and considers current attempts to develop…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper considers a country context where traditional entrepreneurship has not been a major part of the economy and considers current attempts to develop entrepreneurship education (EE) as a part of wider market development.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the background to the economic development of the Post-Soviet states and link this to existing knowledge around EE. The potential routes by which EE might be developed in Uzbekistan are discussed with a focus upon hospitality and tourism education, leading to the development of a model of the six key aspects of change

Findings

The potential for future research is explored, and four aspects are highlighted as areas where partnership working with overseas universities is likely to have substantive benefits. In particular, the development of quality standards and staff development are areas where partnership could have an important influence, whereas barriers within local systems and cultural resistance are likely to benefit less from a partnership approach. Although entrepreneurial competencies and entrepreneurial intent are both important, entrepreneurial intent is highlighted given its role in terms of individual responses to country-level initiatives.

Practical implications

Although all four aspects merit further research, this paper ends with a specific suggestion that future research should draw on the theory of planned behaviour to explore entrepreneurial intent.

Originality/value

Uzbekistan is a relatively under-researched area where hospitality and tourism industries are undergoing a period of intense development.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Claire Seaman and Terry Kirk

Reviews computer software, which provides one medium for nutrition education in schools and among the general public and which is freely available. Some computer packages…

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633

Abstract

Reviews computer software, which provides one medium for nutrition education in schools and among the general public and which is freely available. Some computer packages are distributed by companies and government organizations, while others are distributed via shareware libraries and the Internet. Looks at the development and validation of one such package which was designed and piloted at Queen Margaret College in Edinburgh for Master Foods, the division of Mars UK which markets the Uncle Ben’s range of products.

Details

Health Education, vol. 96 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Claire E.A. Seaman

Features the Fast Food Diner software program produced by British Meat and aimed at teachers and pupils studying Food Technology at Levels 3 and 4 of the National Curriculum.

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240

Abstract

Features the Fast Food Diner software program produced by British Meat and aimed at teachers and pupils studying Food Technology at Levels 3 and 4 of the National Curriculum.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Claire Seaman and Ronald McQuaid

This paper considers the multiple social networks of small family businesses and the dynamic interactions between them. It analyses family, friendship and business…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper considers the multiple social networks of small family businesses and the dynamic interactions between them. It analyses family, friendship and business networks and the way additional ties within the networks become visible when they are considered together rather than separately.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews of thirteen family-owned and managed businesses are used to establish the patterns of networking. A detailed case study is then presented, allowing a deeper qualitative analysis of the interaction of different types of networks.

Findings

The findings explore multiple rationalities employed in the networking of family businesses and how different aspects of their individual family, friendship and business networks contribute to business development.

Research limitations/implications

The paper suggests that a multi-rational theoretical perspective of the family, rather than a solely business-related perspective, deepens the understanding of the dynamics of family businesses behavior and that different types of businesses may be influenced to varying degrees by different rationalities.

Practical implications

Business networking tends to be deliberately encouraged by business support agencies, often via the deliberate development of events. A deeper understanding of the manner in which small businesses use and develop networks would enhance the direction and effectiveness of such investment.

Social implications

Family businesses, especially micro- small- and SME businesses, are often integral to the communities in which they are based. By viewing family businesses within their social space, we acknowledge the importance of the community around them and the integrated nature of family, business and community in rural areas.

Originality/value

The value of this research lies in the proposition that smaller businesses in rural areas are often surrounded by the inter-woven networks of family, business and community.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Claire E.A. Seaman

Discusses the potential uses of computers in the sensory evaluation laboratory. Suggests factors to be taken into consideration when designing a computer system for this…

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1475

Abstract

Discusses the potential uses of computers in the sensory evaluation laboratory. Suggests factors to be taken into consideration when designing a computer system for this application.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Bernard Boateng, Mauricio Silva and Claire Seaman

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a Ghanaian migrant family business in Kent makes financial decisions and measures business growth within the framework of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a Ghanaian migrant family business in Kent makes financial decisions and measures business growth within the framework of Social Network theory and focussing on influences such as family, cultural and social factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study: migrant Ghanaian family business owner in Kent, first generation who migrated to the UK after the year 2000. The business is a small and medium enterprise and running the business as a family.

Findings

The narrative highlights important aspects of cultural and social factors that are not usually considered in credit analysis or applications for a relationship with a mainstream financial services institution. It is also indicated that family and personal attributes and culture had the most social capital for the shop owner to use or explore in taking her financial decisions. The discussions provide a basic framework for future research.

Originality/value

There is a gap in the research of Ghanaian migrant family businesses in the UK, in particular of their financial decision making process.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Rita Welsh, Richard Bent, Claire Seaman and Arthur Ingram

While no two businesses are the same, examples from Edinburgh Pakistani community convenience store owners illustrate business survival strategies developed in response to…

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1389

Abstract

While no two businesses are the same, examples from Edinburgh Pakistani community convenience store owners illustrate business survival strategies developed in response to increased environmental challenges presented by changing consumer behaviour, increased competition and demographic variations. These are related to the individual’s motivation, experience and family business background, and include exiting the sector, gaining recognised qualifications and alternative employment, and involving second and third generations in expanding family business activities. The resulting smaller, but stronger, convenience(c)‐store sector continues to provide opportunities for individual businesses, thus maintaining the economic and social benefits for the ethnic minority community and the wider city population.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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