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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2021

Gozde Aydin, Alison Booth, Claire Margerison and Anthony Worsley

Primary schools provide continuous, intensive contact with large numbers of children starting from a young age, thus providing an appropriate setting for the promotion of…

Abstract

Purpose

Primary schools provide continuous, intensive contact with large numbers of children starting from a young age, thus providing an appropriate setting for the promotion of healthy eating through food and nutrition education (FNE). This qualitative study explores the views of Australian primary school parents about FNE in primary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 19 parents of primary school children from Victoria participated in semi-structured interviews. Audio recordings were transcribed and underwent thematic analysis using Nvivo. A total of three themes emerged: FNE topics currently taught in primary schools, essential food skills and knowledge for primary school children and the importance of FNE.

Findings

Most parents thought that FNE is as important as the core subjects of primary school. Parental support for FNE, which is delivered over a prolonged period, and expanded by hands-on content such as cooking and gardening classes was evident. Parents viewed these classes as likely to improve children's food-related knowledge and healthy eating behaviours. Parents expressed appreciation for schools' emphasis on food sustainability and its alignment with school policies and practices. Parents were keen to see more sustainability included in the curriculum.

Practical implications

These results may have implications for curriculum developers and schools, as the findings can assist the design of food and nutrition curricula for primary schools which can empower children as well as their families to make better food-related decisions.

Originality/value

Australian parents' views of FNE in primary schools have been under examined.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Janandani Nanayakkara, Claire Margerison and Anthony Worsley

Teachers play important roles in school food and nutrition education. This study aims to explore Australian teachers' self-efficacy beliefs (i.e. belief in their own…

Abstract

Purpose

Teachers play important roles in school food and nutrition education. This study aims to explore Australian teachers' self-efficacy beliefs (i.e. belief in their own capabilities to perform specific teaching tasks) in teaching secondary school food and nutrition-related subjects.

Design/methodology/approach

Teachers' overall self-efficacy beliefs in teaching these subjects (overall-SEB) and self-efficacy beliefs in teaching different food and nutrition-related topics (topics-SEB) were explored using a survey among 183 teachers in 2017. Principal components analysis derived three overall-SEB components: “Motivation and accommodation of individual differences”, “Classroom management” and “Communication and clarification” and three topics-SEB components: “Food system”, “Food and nutrition information” and “Food preparation”.

Findings

Overall, higher percentages of teachers were confident or very confident in the majority of items that loaded on “Classroom management” and “Communication and clarification” compared to “Motivation and accommodation of individual differences”. Moreover, higher percentages of teachers were confident or very confident about items that loaded on “Food and nutrition information” and “Food preparation” compared” to “Food system”. The overall-SEB and topics-SEB were higher among more experienced teachers. There were moderate positive correlations between overall-SEB and topics-SEB components.

Originality/value

The exploration of broader aspects of self-efficacy beliefs related to teaching secondary school food and nutrition-related subjects makes this study unique. The findings highlight that these teachers had high self-efficacy beliefs in teaching food and nutrition education, but there are gaps in tailoring the teaching process to meet the diverse needs of students and teaching broader food-related topics.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Janandani Nanayakkara, Claire Margerison and Anthony Worsley

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the food system professionals’ opinions of a new senior secondary school food literacy curriculum named Victorian Certificate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the food system professionals’ opinions of a new senior secondary school food literacy curriculum named Victorian Certificate of Education Food Studies in Victoria, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposive sample of 34 food system professionals from different sub-sectors within the Australian food system was interviewed individually in late 2015 and early 2016. Interviews were analysed using the template analysis technique.

Findings

Most participants appreciated the extensive coverage of food literacy aspects in this new curriculum. However, many suggested amendments to the curriculum including pay less emphasis on food history-related topics and pay more focus on primary food production, nutrition awareness and promotion, and food security, food sovereignty, social justice, and food politics.

Practical implications

A well-structured, comprehensive secondary school food literacy curriculum could play a crucial role in providing food literacy education for adolescents. This will help them to establish healthy food patterns and become responsible food citizens. The findings of this study can be used to modify the new curriculum to make it a more comprehensive, logical, and feasible curriculum. Moreover, these findings could be used to inform the design of new secondary school food literacy curricula in Australia and other countries.

Originality/value

The exploration of perspectives of professionals from a broad range of food- and nutrition-related areas about school food literacy education makes this study unique. This study highlights the importance of food professionals’ opinions in secondary school food-related curricula development.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Janandani Nanayakkara, Melissa Burton, Claire Margerison and Anthony Worsley

Secondary school food education provides students with opportunities to build lifelong healthy dietary practices. A number of stakeholder groups are important for the…

Abstract

Purpose

Secondary school food education provides students with opportunities to build lifelong healthy dietary practices. A number of stakeholder groups are important for the success of this form of education. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to examine young adults’ and parents’ opinions of secondary school food education.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to 1,086 respondents drawn from a commercial research panel.

Findings

In total, 50-60 per cent of all respondents agreed that food education should be compulsory for years seven to ten and 31-32 per cent of respondents agreed that it should be compulsory for years 11 and 12. Almost 69 per cent suggested one to three hours per week for food education. More than 75 per cent of respondents agreed that there should be a non-compulsory food and nutrition subject for year 11 and 12 students and believed that this subject would help students to develop their food-related knowledge and skills.

Practical implications

There is a gap between parents’ and young adults’ views of school food education and what is actually practiced in Australian secondary schools. Obtaining their opinions in future food-related education and policy reforms could help design and deliver food education to better meet the expectations of its recipients: students and their families.

Originality/value

The examination of large number of young adults’ and parents’ opinions of school food education makes this study unique.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Janandani Nanayakkara, Claire Margerison and Anthony Worsley

Implementation of a new food literacy curriculum provides multiple health and social benefits to school students. The success of any new curriculum execution is partly…

Abstract

Purpose

Implementation of a new food literacy curriculum provides multiple health and social benefits to school students. The success of any new curriculum execution is partly determined by teachers’ perceptions about the new curriculum contents, and barriers and challenges for its delivery. The purpose of this paper is to explore teachers’ views of a new food literacy curriculum named Victorian Certificate of Education Food Studies for senior secondary school students in Victoria, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study design was used in this study. In total, 14 teachers who were planning to teach the new curriculum were individually interviewed in October-December 2016. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the template analysis technique.

Findings

The majority of teachers appreciated the inclusion of food literacy and nutrition concepts in the new curriculum. However, half of the teachers had doubts about their readiness to teach it. Most teachers mentioned that they needed more training and resources to increase their confidence in teaching the curriculum.

Practical implications

These findings reveal that teachers need more awareness, resources, and guidance to increase their confidence in delivering the new curriculum. Provision of more resources and opportunities for training in food literacy concepts and instructional methods could facilitate its implementation.

Originality/value

These findings serve as an important first step to gain the perspectives of secondary school teachers’ opinions about the new curriculum. Moreover, these opinions and suggestions could inform the future design and implementation of similar food literacy curricula in Australia or elsewhere.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Claire Massey

This action research study seeks to identify the barriers to effective organisational consulting, and to understand the choices consultants make in working with clients…

Abstract

This action research study seeks to identify the barriers to effective organisational consulting, and to understand the choices consultants make in working with clients. In the first stage of the research the consultants’ experiences, their educational qualifications, and their knowledge of the consultancy literature were identified as important factors in leading to successful client assignments. However, the consultants concluded that the most important influence on the way in which they planned client projects was the way in which they “saw” organisations. This notion provided the basis for the final cycle of the project. Here, the researcher and the consultants sought to describe their organisational metaphors for organisations, and assess the degree to which they influenced their behaviour with clients.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Claire Massey

One of the consequences of the rising profile of the SME sector is that many countries have some sort of “enterprise assistance” programme. In some countries there are…

Abstract

One of the consequences of the rising profile of the SME sector is that many countries have some sort of “enterprise assistance” programme. In some countries there are extensive government‐funded programmes, often delivered by a network of governmental agencies. However, increasingly the distinction between public and private sectors is irrelevant, with the emergence of a new option for clients: agencies that are publicly funded but which deliver their services using a model that has been drawn from the private sector. This has implications for the clients of such services, as well as the service providers themselves. In a number of countries where the “private sector” model is being adopted for the delivery of “public good” services, the agencies involved in designing the policies and delivering the programmes are facing considerable challenges in moving from one model to the other.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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