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Article

Hazel Stuteley and Claire Cohen

The Beacon Project is an example of a successful multi‐agency intervention in a community fraught with social and economic problems. This article first summarises what…

Abstract

The Beacon Project is an example of a successful multi‐agency intervention in a community fraught with social and economic problems. This article first summarises what happened, and then, from the perspectives of organisational and complexity theory, analyses retrospectively the key lessons learnt. The project, which has received national and international recognition, focused upon a partnership between health visitors, residents and statutory agencies. Health visitors helped to forge relationships based on trust and respect, creating the receptive context for transformational change. It is possible that the fluid, ‘collateral’ organisation that was thus developed was capable of both understanding and tackling the complex inter‐organisational and social issues presented by the Estate.The main conclusions are that cohesion and improvement can be developed through facilitated dialogue rather than control and explicit leadership, and that shared vision among agencies, and the trust achieved through equal dialogue, can bring significant change and empowerment to communities.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Claire Cohen

Describes the writer′s experiences as “author” of aprocedures manual for a large contract cleaning company. The seniormanagers were anxious to take control over what they…

Abstract

Describes the writer′s experiences as “author” of a procedures manual for a large contract cleaning company. The senior managers were anxious to take control over what they saw as an unwieldy organization with unclear procedures that badly needed streamlining. The manual reflected senior managers′ need to set up an illusion of control over the organization; in its production process and in its style, it suggested both that a coolly analytical, rational and logical approach was being taken to organizational description and rationalization, and that it was morally right to follow the procedures described. Yet in fulfilling senior managers′ requirements, the manual did not reflect the mess of organizational procedures, and its smooth, “seamless” descriptions implied that employees had nothing original to add to organizational procedures. Concludes that procedures manuals might be seen as inimical to individuality, as a force for control by senior management, and as a means of inhibiting employee creativity.

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Personnel Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Claire Cohen

This article explores two questions. First, can literature be a useful material for the teacher of management? Second, how might this material be used? The article…

Abstract

This article explores two questions. First, can literature be a useful material for the teacher of management? Second, how might this material be used? The article acknowledges the many difficulties for the teacher in using literature but also suggests that literature, if used with attention to its inherent complexities and nuances, can be illuminating for students. The article describes in detail an attempt, by the author, to evaluate the use of literature in a university management class. Conclusions centred on: the value of private reading; input of the teacher; perceived relevance of the literary text to management education.

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The Learning Organization, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article

Alison Pullen and Anne Ross-Smith

This paper aims to review Ruth Simpson’s contribution to the field of gender and management.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review Ruth Simpson’s contribution to the field of gender and management.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper looks at Ruth Simpson’s body of work over her career through a conversation that took place between Pullen and Ross-Smith.

Findings

Ruth Simpson’s contribution to gender, class, work and organizations is discussed.

Originality/value

This piece remembers Ruth Simpson’s feminist scholarship to the field of gender and management.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article

dt ogilvie

Two questions broadly drove this research: Donald Trump promised to fix the economy and create jobs, and he is ending or renegotiating trade treaties. Is he creating more…

Abstract

Purpose

Two questions broadly drove this research: Donald Trump promised to fix the economy and create jobs, and he is ending or renegotiating trade treaties. Is he creating more jobs? How can Trump create a more inclusive economy? The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper closely examines Trump’s economic policies and draws from past Democratic and Republication track records to explain how Trump’s policies will contribute to greater income inequality.

Findings

By all measures, President Trump fails on measures of equality, diversity, and inclusion.

Originality/value

This original paper examines the implications of the Trump administration’s policies in the areas of tax cuts (for small- and medium-sized enterprises rather than large corporations), incentives to support small business growth, entrepreneurship training, education and skills training (to retool Americans), and infrastructure spending.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article

Jon Drabenstott, Sherman Hayes, Tjalda Belastock, John Laucus, David Cohen, Gary Ross, Barbara J. McNally, Jerilyn K. Oltman and Steve Marquardt

Contributors from five libraries address the expectations and realities of their automation projects, including: staff impact, costs and funding, time and schedules…

Abstract

Contributors from five libraries address the expectations and realities of their automation projects, including: staff impact, costs and funding, time and schedules, users, computer support, vendors, and consultants. Some keys to success include: very clear political objectives at the beginning of the project; careful definition of the project structure; a well‐prepared automation plan; carefully‐considered, contractual commitments with a vendor; and flexibility and adaptability.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part

Judith M. Harackiewicz, Yoi Tibbetts, Elizabeth Canning and Janet S. Hyde

We review the interventions that promote motivation in academic contexts, with a focus on two primary questions: How can we motivate students to take more STEM courses…

Abstract

Purpose

We review the interventions that promote motivation in academic contexts, with a focus on two primary questions: How can we motivate students to take more STEM courses? Once in those STEM courses, how can we keep students motivated and promote their academic achievement?

Design/methodology/approach

We have approached these two motivational questions from several perspectives, examining the theoretical issues with basic laboratory research, conducting longitudinal questionnaire studies in classrooms, and developing interventions implemented in different STEM contexts. Our research is grounded in three theories that we believe are complementary: expectancy-value theory (Eccles & Wigfield, 2002), interest theory (Hidi & Renninger, 2006), and self-affirmation theory (Steele, 1988). As social psychologists, we have focused on motivational theory and used experimental methods, with an emphasis on values – students’ perceptions of the value of academic tasks and students’ personal values that shape their experiences in academic contexts.

Findings

We review the experimental field studies in high-school science and college psychology classes, in which utility-value interventions promoted interest and performance for high-school students in science classes and for undergraduate students in psychology courses. We also review a randomized intervention in which parents received information about the utility value of math and science for their teens in high school; this intervention led students to take nearly one semester more of science and mathematics, compared with the control group. Finally, we review an experimental study of values affirmation in a college biology course and found that the intervention improved performance and retention for first-generation college students, closing the social-class achievement gap by 50%. We conclude by discussing the mechanisms through which these interventions work.

Originality/value

These interventions are exciting for their broad applicability in improving students’ academic choices and performance, they are also exciting regarding their potential for contributions to basic science. The combination of laboratory experiments and field experiments is advancing our understanding of the motivational principles and almost certainly will continue to do so. At the same time, interventions may benefit from becoming increasingly targeted at specific motivational processes that are effective with particular groups or in particular contexts.

Details

Motivational Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-555-5

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Article

Md Rokonuzzaman, Atmadeep Mukherjee, Pramod Iyer and Amaradri Mukherjee

Return policies are major risk-allaying cues for customers, yet they are a critical cost/lost-sales for retailers. Despite their importance in the retailing industry, few…

Abstract

Purpose

Return policies are major risk-allaying cues for customers, yet they are a critical cost/lost-sales for retailers. Despite their importance in the retailing industry, few studies have examined the interplay of return policies with other cues that customers use to make a purchase decision. Toward this end, this study aims to investigate the interaction effects certain salient high-scope and low-scope cues, such as consumer ratings and brand image, and retailers’ return policies have on consumer purchase decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on literature from signaling theory and cue scope literature (high-scope and low-scope cues), the authors develop a research model that hypothesizes the interrelationships between return policies, price discounts, customer product ratings and brand image. Three experimental studies investigate the potential interplay between return policies (lenient vs stringent), price discounts (low vs high), customer product ratings (low vs high) and brand image (high vs low) on quality certainty perceptions and purchase intentions. The mediating effect of quality certainty perceptions on the interplay of various factors (return policy, price promotions, consumer ratings and brand image) and customer purchase intentions is also investigated.

Findings

Results indicate that a lenient return policy will have a positive effect when consumers encounter high scope cues that signal undesirable aspects of the product (i.e. low consumer ratings, low brand image). In contrast, when high scope cues signal desirable aspects of the product (i.e. high consumer ratings, high brand image), it attenuates the effects of return policy. The findings suggest that quality certainty acts as a psychological process.

Research limitations/implications

Service researchers should seek to examine the role of return policies in a more comprehensive manner.

Practical implications

Return policies are important cues for consumers while making purchase decision. Thus, retailers need to realize that these policies may need to be more dynamic or tiered, rather than one-size-fits-all.

Originality/value

This study provides a more comprehensive view of how consumers consider multiple cues simultaneously in decision-making. Literature has mainly examined the interactions between different high-scope and low-scope cues, but there has been limited research directed toward the interplay between multiple high-scope cues.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Yang S. Yang, Thomas J. Kull, Abraham Y. Nahm and Benbo Li

Studies show the benefits of supplier integration, yet negative attitudes toward supplier integration exist that research fails to explain. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies show the benefits of supplier integration, yet negative attitudes toward supplier integration exist that research fails to explain. The purpose of this paper is to investigate managerial attitudes toward supplier integration and how intra-firm processes and culture affect the formation of such attitudes. In particular, the paper aims to examine the differing influences between the USA and China.

Design/methodology/approach

Using multi-group structural equation modeling, the authors re-analyzed the data collected by Nahm et al. (2004) and Li et al. (2014) comprised of responses from 224 US and 117 Chinese manufacturing managers.

Findings

The study finds that managerial attitudes toward supplier integration depend on the degree to which a collaborative organizational culture and synchronous manufacturing practices exist within a firm. Moreover, in the Chinese context, the influence of a collaborative organizational culture is lower than the influence of synchronous manufacturing practices. The opposite is found in the US context.

Practical implications

The results suggest that overcoming negative attitudes of supplier integration requires more than simply espousing the benefits of supplier integration; looking deeper into an organization’s internal characteristics and situational context is required. In particular, if the country context already emphasizes the collaborative culture, the organization should focus on synchronous manufacturing practices in order to form a positive attitude toward supplier integration.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to examine how managerial attitudes toward supplier integration are formed. The work is novel because the authors suggest that the formation of managerial attitudes toward supplier integration inter-firm management can be affected by intra-firm management in the minds of managers, which are influenced by country contexts.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Edward Osei Akoto and Claire Allison Stammerjohan

The purpose of this paper is to draw upon exchange theory to test the moderating effect of perceived inflation on dual commitment among a sample of health professionals in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw upon exchange theory to test the moderating effect of perceived inflation on dual commitment among a sample of health professionals in Ghana. The authors test this effect on the unilateral contributions of commitment to the organization and commitment to the professional association.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey questionnaires were used to elicit responses from 141 health professionals in Ghana. Least square moderated regression analysis was employed to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The authors found that respondents do exhibit dual commitment to the organization and the professional association. The findings also supported the hypothesized moderating effect of perceived inflation on the contribution of the unilateral commitments to dual loyalty. Perceived inflation alters the contributions from the predictors, hence, reducing dual commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The study sampled only public sector employees, but the authors do not consider this a fatal flaw since the public sector in Ghana employs a large percentage (51 percent) of the workforce. Future research should focus on the private sector to increase the generalizability of the perceived inflation construct.

Practical implications

Perceived inflation can have adverse effects on workplace attitudes, including dual loyalty to the organization and to the union. But the finding also suggests that, in periods of inflationary pressures, high affective commitment can benefit the organization. The perceived reduction in the value of the economic exchange clearly has implications for compensation policy for the public sector in Ghana.

Originality/value

Researchers have examined the perception of inflation on consumer behavior, but none has investigated the inflationary influence on workplace attitudes. This study extends the conceptualization of the index of perceived inflation and the psychology of inflation to the management literature. This study is the first to investigate the effect of perceived inflation on commitment.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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