Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Wendy C. Doucette and Rebecca L. Tolley

This chapter investigates ways in which civility and mindful speech within the library workplace can improve the quality of employees’ interactions with each other. While…

Abstract

This chapter investigates ways in which civility and mindful speech within the library workplace can improve the quality of employees’ interactions with each other. While most examinations of communication within libraries focus on the exchange between patrons and providers, this case study focuses on the vehicle of communication among co-workers and examines how civil discourse coupled with mindful speech reinforced by mindful actions can foster an atmosphere of cooperation, leading ultimately to empathy. We highlight common points within national and local civility initiatives which allow institutions to preserve their own unique culture while adhering to accepted benchmarks of civil dialogue. Although we present a mix of suggested strategies for cultivating mindful words and actions, based on empirical research limited to our own institution, we recommend civility and mindful speech leading to mindful action as gateways toward the adaptation of healthy shared values. Emphasizing civility, one of the cornerstones of civilization and peaceful coexistence, has widespread practical and social implications for countering the detrimental effects of poor communication. This effective, affordable, and attainable practice can repair the underdeveloped, fractured, and even dysfunctional relationships which lead to low workplace morale.

Details

Emotion in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-083-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Olga L. Clark and Benjamin M. Walsh

Research has consistently shown that organizational constraints lead to deviant behavioral reactions. Although many studies have investigated personality variables as…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has consistently shown that organizational constraints lead to deviant behavioral reactions. Although many studies have investigated personality variables as moderators of such predictors of deviance, considerably less research has considered cross-level moderators of these effects. The purpose of this paper is to draw on several related theories to test team civility climate as a cross-level moderator of the organizational constraints – interpersonal deviance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using paper-and-pencil surveys from 239 employees nested within 68 work teams. Teams were employed in various industries including healthcare, insurance, manufacturing/engineering, and financial services.

Findings

Results from hierarchical linear modeling analyses demonstrated that the effect of organizational constraints on interpersonal deviance varied significantly across teams. In addition, the positive relationship between organizational constraints and interpersonal deviance was attenuated in teams with a high civility climate.

Practical implications

Organizational constraints may be difficult to eliminate in many workplaces. However, results suggest that by developing a positive civility climate, teams can help prevent deviant behaviors that may be associated with experienced constraints.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to examine civility climate as a shared property of the team and as a cross-level moderator. Findings from this research contribute to theories of deviant organizational behavior by highlighting the critical role of variables emanating from levels of analysis beyond the individual.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Anuj Gupta and Pankaj Singh

The antecedents and consequences of work engagement have been extensively discussed and analyzed in the previous literature; however, identifying cost-effective measures…

Abstract

Purpose

The antecedents and consequences of work engagement have been extensively discussed and analyzed in the previous literature; however, identifying cost-effective measures that can sustain work engagement to boost work outcomes has received sparse attention in the Indian information technology (IT) context. This study aims to provide new insights concerning the associations of job crafting and workplace civility with work engagement and its corresponding outcomes, such as change perception, general life satisfaction and intention to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling on data obtained from 369 software developers in India using questionnaire surveys.

Findings

Results confirmed that work engagement partially mediated the association of job crafting and workplace civility with the perception of change and general life satisfaction. The negative associations of job crafting and workplace civility with the intention to quit were also partially mediated by work engagement. The findings can be used to inform human resources strategies to boost work engagement and subsequent work outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this empirical work will offer insights to managers who are looking for cost-effective interventions and behaviors aimed at increasing work engagement and, consequently, achieving effective work outcomes.

Originality/value

This study contributes by empirically testing the application of novel employee-driven practices in improving work engagement and work outcomes, particularly in the context of IT companies in India.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Peter Johnson

Working on the assumption that civility is the core value of R.G. Collingwood's political philosophy, the paper aims to examine the capacity of civility to curb economic…

Abstract

Purpose

Working on the assumption that civility is the core value of R.G. Collingwood's political philosophy, the paper aims to examine the capacity of civility to curb economic excess in the absence of distributive justice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates the economic and political writings of Collingwood to see if they can be made to yield restraints on economic excess when based on civility alone. Comparisons are drawn between Collingwood and modern liberal philosophers such as John Rawls in order to identify where Collingwood stands on key concepts in the argument. Contrasts are established with Hobbes and Ruskin on the issues at stake, so clarifying what can be drawn from Collingwood on the specific topic under discussion.

Findings

The paper concludes that there is theoretical scope within Collingwood's political writings for a curb on economic excess in the absence of a concept of distributive justice, even though this takes a different form from the approach of modern liberals such as John Rawls.

Originality/value

It is shown that Collingwood's economic writings are relevant to modern discussions of social justice even when it is civility and not justice that is Collingwood's main focus.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 37 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2016

Leah P. Hollis

The simultaneous proliferation of developmental education and online computer-based education creates questions about the success and failure of students engaging in…

Abstract

The simultaneous proliferation of developmental education and online computer-based education creates questions about the success and failure of students engaging in remediation without teacher-led instruction. While many studies show minimal difference in student performance between online and face-to-face instruction (Schenker, 2007; Utts et al., 2003; Ward, 2004; Zieffler et al., 2008), other researchers (Bahr, 2012; Bailey, 2009; Crisp & Delgado, 2014) examine the effectiveness of developmental education to assist students in math, English, or both. In addition, Astin’s student development theory (1999) confirms that positive faculty-student interaction helps students persist through the curriculum. Faculty can create those supportive environments that help students. Therefore, within the cross-section of developmental education and computer-based instruction, the purpose of this study is to consider the importance of teacher care and civility for black and Hispanic developmental English students in an open-access, minority-serving institution. The findings show that while a statistically significant relationship was not observed, there is a positive relationship between students’ perception that the professor is caring and civil and the final grade.

Details

The Coercive Community College: Bullying and its Costly Impact on the Mission to Serve Underrepresented Populations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-597-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Isha Sharma, Kokil Jain and Gurinder Singh

The study investigates the effect of an uncivil comment made by a party representative on social media and tests whether it can lead to a change in observers' attitude…

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigates the effect of an uncivil comment made by a party representative on social media and tests whether it can lead to a change in observers' attitude toward the party.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from 196 respondents using a scenario-based survey. Proposed model is tested using partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

It is found that individual's moral identity and issue involvement influence perceived civility of the online post, which in turn affects attitude toward the party as well as the individual. It is observed that for high partisans, effect of perceived civility on attitude toward the party is stronger compared to low partisans. Party's lack of responsiveness to address the uncivil comment from its representative increases party's incivility accountability and lowers the partisan attitude toward the party.

Originality/value

The study presents a novel understanding of how political party representatives can influence the image of the party by engaging in an uncivil discourse on social media. Results support that strong partisan would react more unfavorably indicating that loyalty toward the party cannot be taken for granted.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-03-2020-0084

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Olga L. Sharp, Yisheng Peng and Steve M. Jex

The purpose of this paper is to expand the research on workplace mistreatment and its effects on individual employees while taking into account the organizational setting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand the research on workplace mistreatment and its effects on individual employees while taking into account the organizational setting. This cross-level study explores the interaction between the team Civility climate (CC) and individual experience of exclusion and their combined effect on the target’s organization-based self-esteem (OBSE).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 251 individuals nested in 71 teams (mean team size=4.6) completed surveys. A two-way multi-level interaction model was used to test the moderation hypothesis.

Findings

The cross-level interaction between CC and exclusion was significant, which means that CC influenced the strength of the relationship between exclusion and OBSE. Specifically, it was found that the higher the group-level civility norms, the stronger the negative relationship between exclusion and OBSE.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is its cross-sectional design. All variables were self-reported and collected at one time-point.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to workplace mistreatment literature by using a multi-level design to examine exclusion as a predictor of OBSE and team CC as a cross-level moderator of this relationship.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

R. Michael Bokeno

The purpose of this paper is to expose some underlying implications of the term “civility” as a developmental issue for preferred behavior in organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expose some underlying implications of the term “civility” as a developmental issue for preferred behavior in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The terms “civility” and “community” are contrasted with the intent of determining what behaviors we really want at work.

Findings

Civility invokes rules and behavioral codes that might preclude community.

Practical implications

Civility” and “community” require distinct sets of interaction behavior and understanding.

Social implications

Reflection on what we really want in our interaction with others at work should drive organizational policies regarding preferred organizational behavior.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Leslie Armour

The globalisation of the world economy has left governments less powerful and threatened cultures with homogenisation. The Huntington thesis – that the world is now…

Abstract

The globalisation of the world economy has left governments less powerful and threatened cultures with homogenisation. The Huntington thesis – that the world is now divided into rival civilisations and that they are likely to be the source of the next round of world conflicts – may seem weak in the light of this. In fact many people fear that economic efficiency will produce a single culture and, because it will be dominated by hotly competing corporations with little restraint, will threaten civility itself. R.G. Collingwood even argued that economics as a practical science threatens civilisation by its very existence. This paper argues that, if one takes seriously Collingwood’s own distinction between wealth and riches, and if a co‐operative economy can be made to flourish, civilisation can readily survive. Wealth in these terms is a community resource which frees up human possibilities, riches are personal barricades and a source of power, and we can understand how to maximise wealth without creating unnecessary riches. In these terms the three main competing civilisations – that of the West, that of Islam, and the Chinese civilisation which is exemplified, for instance in Taiwan, may well survive and remain distinct. They represent basic human choices. For one can have societies in which the major focus is on individuals, societies in which it is on the community as a whole, and societies in which it is on families, social groups, churches and other institutions which comprise civil society.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

María Helena Jaén, Ezequiel Reficco and Marcela Ossa

The purpose of this paper is to examine the formative potential of the case method on MBA students’ “civility” – the procedural dimension of the ethics field. While a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the formative potential of the case method on MBA students’ “civility” – the procedural dimension of the ethics field. While a robust literature has focussed on the impact of teaching ethics (content) on students’ behavior, to-date no study has explored the link between the pedagogy used (method) and students behavioral dispositions.

Design/methodology/approach

A thorough theory review was conducted, covering the different pedagogy literatures that frame the discussion on the link between learning methods and ethics in general, and civic-minded behavior in particular. Drawing on relevant findings from these literatures, some implications are drawn, and tentative propositions are laid out.

Findings

The study seeks to readdress the existing imbalance between the cognitive and the formative aspects of education, placing emphasis on the latter. The paper proposes that, other things being equal, MBA programs that make intensive and systematic use of the case method will foster civility among students. Through the iterative practices embedded in the case method, students internalize a number of behavioral predispositions that form the basis of civic behavior.

Practical implications

This paper calls for an approach in managerial education that goes beyond the transmission of knowledge. In particular, the paper emphasize the importance of seeing the MBA as “little schools of democracy,” where civic-oriented inclinations can take root in future business leaders. This finding carries substantial implications for business schools and professors, in Latin America and beyond.

Originality/value

The transmission of technical knowledge has traditionally been considered the backbone of managerial education – a purely cognitive process. This paper, on the other hand, seeks to highlight the transformative potential of the MBA through the use of the appropriate learning methodologies - the case method in particular. By focussing on the concept of civility, the paper seek to go beyond the prevailing focus on content among ethics scholars and highlight the relevance of habits as a necessary first step on the shaping of civic-minded business leaders. This paper adds a much needed missing link between learning methods and civic behavior.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000