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Article

Olga Piedad Zalamea Patino, Jos Van Orshoven and Thérèse Steenberghen

The purpose of this paper is to present the development of an ontological model consisting of terms and relationships between these terms, creating a conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the development of an ontological model consisting of terms and relationships between these terms, creating a conceptual information model for the Built Cultural Heritage (BCH) domain, more specifically for preventive conservation.

Design/methodology/approach

The On-To-Knowledge methodology was applied in the ontology development process. Terms related to preventive conservation were identified by means of a taxonomy which was used later to identify related existing ontologies. Three ontologies were identified and merged, i.e. Geneva City Geographic Markup Language (Geneva CityGML), Monument Damage ontology (Mondis) and CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model (CIDOC-CRM). Additional classes and properties were defined as to provide a complete semantic framework for management of BCH.

Findings

A BCH-ontology for preventive conservation was created. It consists of 143 classes from which 38 originate from the Mondis ontology, 38 from Geneva CityGML, 37 from CIDOC-CRM and 30 were newly created. The ontology was applied in a use case related to the New cathedral in the city of Cuenca, Ecuador. Advantages over other type of systems and for the BCH-domain were discussed based on this example.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed ontology is in a testing stage through which a number of its aspects are being verified.

Originality/value

This ontological model is the first one to focus on the preventive conservation of BCH.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article

Sisi Zlatanova, Laure Itard, Mahmud Shahrear Kibria and Machiel van Dorst

Urban renewal is a multifaceted activity that involves numerous actors, software, and types of data. Design communication tools play an important role in this process…

Abstract

Urban renewal is a multifaceted activity that involves numerous actors, software, and types of data. Design communication tools play an important role in this process. Visual information helps to outline, understand, and choose sustainable solutions for problems in the design, while visual tools should be able to diminish professional differences and establish a common language. Recent 3D geo-technologies offer a great variety of new tools that significantly enrich visualisation possibilities and allow for flexible switching between different 3D representations. However, studies have indicated that particular representations create different perceptions in professional compared to non-professional individuals. This paper discusses the specifics of urban renewal processes in the Netherlands and investigates recently developed 3D geo-information technology, and more specifically multiple 3D representations, that can support this task. The concept of LOD, which uses five levels of information, was evaluated as a very promising approach to agree on abstractions and representations in the different renewal phases. The study did not reveal a lack of digital possibilities for visualisation, but instead showed that the simultaneous visualisation of the proposed alternatives should be a priority. This investigation did reveal that different levels of interactivity could be used for the presentation and communication of project alternatives.

Details

Open House International, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Article

Yusuf Arayici

The transformation of cities from the industrial age (unsustainable) to the knowledge age (sustainable) is essentially a “whole life cycle” process consisting of planning…

Abstract

Purpose

The transformation of cities from the industrial age (unsustainable) to the knowledge age (sustainable) is essentially a “whole life cycle” process consisting of planning, development, operation, reuse and renewal. During this transformation, a multi‐disciplinary knowledge base, created from studies and research about the built environment aspects is fundamental: historical, architectural, archeologically, environmental, social, economic, etc., and critical. Although there are a growing number of applications of 3D VR modelling applications, some built environment applications such as disaster management, environmental simulations, computer‐aided architectural design and planning require more sophisticated models beyond 3D graphical visualization such as multifunctional, interoperable, intelligent, and multi‐representational. Advanced digital mapping technologies such as 3D laser scanner technologies can be enablers for effective e‐planning, consultation and communication of users' views during the planning, design, construction and lifecycle process of the built environment. These technologies can be used to drive the productivity gains by promoting a free‐flow of information between departments, divisions, offices, and sites; and between themselves, their contractors and partners when the data captured via those technologies are processed and modelled into building information modelling (BIM). The use of these technologies is a key enabler to the creation of new approaches to the “Whole Life Cycle” process within the built and human environment for the twenty‐first century. This paper aims to look at this subject.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the research towards BIM for existing structures via the point cloud data captured by the 3D laser scanner technology. A case study building is used to demonstrate how to produce 3D CAD models and BIM models of existing structures based on designated techniques.

Findings

The paper finds that BIM can be achieved for existing structures by modelling the data captured with 3D laser scanner from the existing world. This can be accomplished by adapting appropriate automated data processing and pattern recognition techniques through applied science research.

Practical implications

BMI will enable automated and fast data capture and modelling for not only in design and planning, building refurbishment, effective heritage documentation and VR modelling but also disaster management, environmental analysis, assessment and monitoring, GIS implementation, sophisticated simulation environments for different purposes such as climate change, regeneration simulation for complexity and uncertainty and so on. As a result, it will increase the capability for fast production of virtual reality models and comprehensive and sophisticated simulation platforms.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on BMI for existing structures.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

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Article

Juan Manuel Davila Delgado and Lukumon O. Oyedele

The purpose of this paper is to review and provide recommendations to extend the current open standard data models for describing monitoring systems and circular economy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and provide recommendations to extend the current open standard data models for describing monitoring systems and circular economy precepts for built assets. Open standard data models enable robust and efficient data exchange which underpins the successful implementation of a circular economy. One of the largest opportunities to reduce the total life cycle cost of a built asset is to use the building information modelling (BIM) approach during the operational phase because it represents the largest share of the entire cost. BIM models that represent the actual conditions and performance of the constructed assets can boost the benefits of the installed monitoring systems and reduce maintenance and operational costs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a horizontal investigation of current BIM data models and their use for describing circular economy principles and performance monitoring of built assets. Based on the investigation, an extension to the industry foundation classes (IFC) specification, recommendations and guidelines are presented which enable to describe circular economy principles and asset monitoring using IFC.

Findings

Current open BIM data models are not sufficiently mature yet. This limits the interoperability of the BIM approach and the implementation of circular economy principles. An overarching approach to extend the current standards is necessary, which considers aspects related to not only modelling the monitoring system but also data management and analysis.

Originality/value

To the authors’ best knowledge, this is the first study that identifies requirements for data model standards in the context current linear economic model of making, using and disposing is growing unsustainably far beyond the finite limits of planet of a circular economy. The results of this study set the basis for the extension of current standards required to apply the circular economy precepts.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article

Jiwat Ram, Numan Khan Afridi and Khawar Ahmed Khan

Big Data (BD) is being increasingly used in a variety of industries including construction. Yet, little research exists that has examined the factors which drive BD…

Abstract

Purpose

Big Data (BD) is being increasingly used in a variety of industries including construction. Yet, little research exists that has examined the factors which drive BD adoption in construction. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap in knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from literature (55 articles) were analyzed using content analysis techniques. Taking a two-pronged approach, first study presents a systematic perspective of literature on BD in construction. Then underpinned by technology–organization–environment theory and supplemented by literature, a conceptual model of five antecedent factors of BD adoption for use in construction is proposed.

Findings

The results show that BD adoption in construction is driven by a number of factors: first, technological: augmented BD–BIM integration and BD relative advantage; second, organizational: improved design and execution efficiencies, and improved project management capabilities; and third, environmental: augmented availability of BD-related technology for construction. Hypothetical relationships involving these factors are then developed and presented through a new model of BD adoption in construction.

Research limitations/implications

The study proposes a number of adoption factors and then builds a new conceptual model advancing theories on technologies adoption in construction.

Practical implications

Findings will help managers (e.g. chief information officers, IT/IS managers, business and senior managers) to understand the factors that drive adoption of BD in construction and plan their own BD adoption. Results will help policy makers in developing policy guidelines to create sustainable environment for the adoption of BD for enhanced economic, social and environmental benefits.

Originality/value

This paper develops a new model of BD adoption in construction and proposes some new factors of adoption process.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article

Bahriye Ilhan and Banu Yobas

The purpose of this paper is to examine the issues that should be considered for a better gauge of the construction industry and built environment and to propose a set of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the issues that should be considered for a better gauge of the construction industry and built environment and to propose a set of indicators for measuring the social, economic and environmental value of construction.

Design/methodology/approach

The indicators proposed in this study use Pearce’s schema, which presents a framework to evaluate the socio-economic value of construction and its contribution to sustainable development. After analysing the problems faced by the industry, solutions are raised and finally indicators for each pillar of Pearce’s schema are established through a literature review. Since the proposed indicators can be used for cross-country analysis, these comparisons are also presented as graphs including only those countries for which valid national data could be sourced from OECD databases.

Findings

The issues, suggestions and indicators related to each concern about the main domains of the schema are addressed through the related literature and supported by available statistical data.

Originality/value

Although previous studies have drawn attention to measures for better evaluation of the construction industry and the built environment, this study, distinctively, presents an integrated approach in order to gauge the true value and impacts of construction in a more comprehensive way. The work’s contribution to the body of knowledge is in revealing the hidden input and impact of construction on sustainable development by determining the barriers to this and their solutions, in addition to the proposal of relevant indicators.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Content available
Article

Nawel Lafioune and Michèle St-Jacques

This paper aims to create a new searchable 3D city model to help managers improve their decision-making.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to create a new searchable 3D city model to help managers improve their decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper identifies data management basics and the key elements used in the new model design; it further analyzes five-city models, presents its findings and proposes analytical trends for the new model. It discusses the concepts underlying existing models, explains the benefit brought by the proposed model and demonstrates its robustness.

Findings

City systems can be interconnected, thanks to data digitization and the integration of new technologies into different management processes. Although there are several 3D city models available, none of those identified in this research can be queried for several sectors.

Research limitations/implications

This model design can only be successfully realized in the presence of a public mandate. Potential limitations include information security risks and political non-acceptance.

Originality/value

The present work proposes a searchable and high performance model having the distinctive capacity to bring together city systems and perform real-time data analysis in order to extract important information needed to guide the city, and in the context of a global vision.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

Keywords

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Article

Shenghua Zhou, S. Thomas Ng, Sang Hoon Lee, Frank J. Xu and Yifan Yang

In the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, technology developers have difficulties in fully understanding user needs due to the high domain…

Abstract

Purpose

In the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, technology developers have difficulties in fully understanding user needs due to the high domain knowledge threshold and the lack of effective and efficient methods to minimise information asymmetry between technology developers and AEC users. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthetic approach combining domain knowledge and text mining techniques is proposed to help capture user needs, which is demonstrated using building information modelling (BIM) apps as a case. The synthetic approach includes the: collection and cleansing of BIM apps’ attribute data and users’ comments; incorporation of domain knowledge into the collected comments; performance of a sentiment analysis to distinguish positive and negative comments; exploration of the relationships between user sentiments and BIM apps’ attributes to unveil user preferences; and establishment of a topic model to identify problems frequently raised by users.

Findings

The results show that those BIM app categories with high user interest but low sentiments or supplies, such as “reality capture”, “interoperability” and “structural simulation and analysis”, should deserve greater efforts and attention from developers. BIM apps with continual updates and of small size are more preferred by users. Problems related to the “support for new Revit”, “import & export” and “external linkage” are most frequently complained by users.

Originality/value

The main contributions of this work include: the innovative application of text mining techniques to identify user needs to drive BIM apps development; and the development of a synthetic approach to orchestrating domain knowledge, text mining techniques (i.e. sentiment analysis and topic modelling) and statistical methods in order to help extract user needs for promoting the success of emerging technologies in the AEC industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article

Renato Vieira, Paulo Carreira, Pedro Domingues and Antonio Aguiar Costa

Despite the continuous development of Building Information Modeling (BIM) standards, not all of its dimensions are supported to the same extent. This is the case of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the continuous development of Building Information Modeling (BIM) standards, not all of its dimensions are supported to the same extent. This is the case of Building Automation Systems (BAS) in which the features that are limited mostly to physical setup of devices are supported. These are largely insufficient to support modeling automation scenarios. The purpose of this article is to clarify the gap in the state of the art and define the need for further developments.

Design/methodology/approach

This article explores the existing gap in the literature and discusses the hypothesis of extending BIM to a wider support of BA concepts. Based on an assessment of scientific and technical literature, this study elicits the information requirements of BA and performs a gap analysis with current BIM standards, such as Industry Foundation Classes (IFC).

Findings

Our findings lead us to conclude that there is a lack of completeness regarding features from BAS automation and management levels. Furthermore, it is shown that IFC is the most adequate data model to cover BAS without losing its purpose, but there is still a considerable work that needs to be addressed in future research.

Originality/value

BIM standards such as IFC position themselves as natural candidates for modeling and exchanging information regarding BA. However, the extent to which BIM supports automation features has never been rigorously analyzed. This article explores the existing gap in the literature and discusses the hypothesis of extending BIM to a wider support of BA concepts. Based on an assessment of scientific and technical literature, this study elicits the information requirements of BA and performs a gap analysis with current BIM standards such as IFC.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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