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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

John David McEwen Arnold and Don Lafreniere

The purpose of this paper is to create a longitudinal data-driven model of change over time in a postindustrial landscape, using the “Copper Country” of Michigan’s Upper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to create a longitudinal data-driven model of change over time in a postindustrial landscape, using the “Copper Country” of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula as a case study. The models resulting from this project will support the heritage management and public education goals of the contemporary communities and Keweenaw National Historical Park that administer this nationally significant mining region through accessible, engaging, and interpretable digital heritage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies Esri’s CityEngine procedural modeling software to an existing historical big data set. The Copper Country Historical Spatial Data Infrastructure, previously created by the HESA lab, contains over 120,000 spatiotemporally specific building footprints and other built environment variables. This project constructed a pair of 3D digital landscapes comparing the built environments of 1917 and 1949, reflecting the formal and functional evolution of several of the most important copper mining, milling, and smelting districts of Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula.

Findings

This research discovered that CityEngine, while intended for rapid 3D modeling of the contemporary urban landscape, was sufficiently robust and flexible to be applied to modeling serial historic industrial landscapes. While this novel application required some additional coding and finish work, by harnessing this software to existing big data sets, 48,000 individual buildings were rapidly visualized using several key variables.

Originality/value

This paper presents a new and useful application of an existing 3D modeling software, helping to further illuminate and inform the management and conservation of the rich heritage of this still-evolving postindustrial landscape.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Alia Belkaïd, Abdelkader Ben Saci and Ines Hassoumi

The overall functioning of this system is based on two approaches: construction and supervision. The first is conducted entirely by the machine, and the second requires…

Abstract

Purpose

The overall functioning of this system is based on two approaches: construction and supervision. The first is conducted entirely by the machine, and the second requires the intervention of the designer to collaborate with the machine. The morphological translation of urban rules is sometimes contradictory and may require additional external relevance to urban rules. Designer arbitration assists the artificial intelligence (AI) in accomplishing this task and solving the problem.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a method of computational design in generating the optimal authorized bounding volume which uses the best target values of morphological urban rules. It examines an intelligent system, adopting the multi-agent approach, which aims to control and increase urban densification by optimizing morphological urban rules. The process of the system is interactive and iterative. It allows collaboration and exchange between the machine and the designer. This paper is adopting and developing a new approach to resolve the distributed constraint optimization problem in generating the authorized bounding volume. The resolution is not limited to an automatic volume generation from urban rules, but also involves the production of multiple optimal-solutions conditioned both by urban constraints and relevance chosen by the designer. The overall functioning of this system is based on two approaches: construction and supervision. The first is conducted entirely by the machine and the second requires the intervention of the designer to collaborate with the machine. The morphological translation of urban rules is sometimes contradictory and may require additional external relevance to urban rules. Designer arbitration assists the AI in accomplishing this task and solving the problem. The human-computer collaboration is achieved at the appropriate time and relies on the degree of constraint satisfaction. This paper shows and analyses interactions with the machine during the building generation process. It presents different cases of application and discusses the relationship between relevance and constraints satisfaction. This topic can inform a chosen urban densification strategy by assisting a typology of the optimal authorized bounding volume.

Findings

The human-computer collaboration is achieved at the appropriate time and relies on the degree of constraint satisfaction with fitness function.

Originality/value

The resolution of the distributed constraint optimization problem is not limited to an automatic generation of urban rules, but involves also the production of multiple optimal ABV conditioned both by urban constraints as well as relevance, chosen by the designer.

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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