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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Lisa Schmidthuber, Simone Stütz and Dennis Hilgers

Governments all over the world have implemented citizensourcing initiatives to integrate citizens into decision-making processes. A more participative decision-making…

Abstract

Purpose

Governments all over the world have implemented citizensourcing initiatives to integrate citizens into decision-making processes. A more participative decision-making process is associated with an open government and assumed to benefit public service quality and interactive value creation. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the outcomes of open government initiatives and ask to what extent open government participation is related to perceived outcomes of open government.

Design/methodology/approach

Data conducted from a survey among users of a citizensourcing platform and platform data are used to perform non-parametric analyses and examine the relationship between platform participation and perceived outcomes of open government.

Findings

The findings of this paper suggest that active platform usage positively relates to several outcomes perceived by citizens, such as improved information flow, increased trust in and satisfaction with local government. In contrast, repetitive participation does not significantly relate to users’ outcome evaluation.

Practical implications

This study suggests public managers to provide possibilities for citizen participation and interaction with government such as citizensourcing initiatives. In particular, it recommends promoting participants’ platform activity, as proactive platform participation has positive effects on perceived outcomes of open government.

Originality/value

Previous literature discussed what it needs to realize a transparent and participatory government. First empirical studies deal with government institutions’ reasons to promote exchange with citizens, and investigate citizens’ motivation to participate in citizensourcing activities, but have disregarded the consequences of open government so far. This study thus provides first insights into the outcomes of open government, as perceived by the users.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

Mehmet (Michael) Ibrahim Mehmet and Peter Simmons

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how upstream social marketing may benefit from social media citizensourcing and improve understanding of community preferences…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how upstream social marketing may benefit from social media citizensourcing and improve understanding of community preferences and attitudes to policy. Using the case of shark management in New South Wales, Australia, this paper aims to understand community attitudes toward shark management policy-making and policymakers.

Design/methodology/approach

In February 2017, more than 11,200 comments were sourced from Facebook and Twitter using Netvizz, a data extraction tool. To analyze these comments, the study used an abductive framework using social marketing, wildlife and coexistence and policy literature, to determine context, themes and sub-themes. This was combined with Appraisal, a systemic functional linguistics framework, advocating a social reference for coding and analyzing community attitudes and preference.

Findings

Preferences for non-lethal measures over lethal or potentially lethal measures were noted, with new technologies highly favored. The online communities wanted a policy that was respectful of human and marine life and focused on patrolled or popular beaches. The main negative comments made related to perceived knee-jerk reactions and poor communication surrounding decision-making. People held little confidence in politicians’ skills and abilities to solve complex and multi-faceted problems, demanding less top-down decision-making and greater community input into policy formation.

Practical implications

This approach could assist upstream social marketers better understand social and community attitudes and preferences toward policy.

Originality/value

The study demonstrated that listening to community through digital channels can assist upstream social marketing understand community preferences and attitudes to policies and the policy-making process. Using abduction further broadens the perspective of the researchers in assigning meaning to commentary.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Sang M. Lee, Taewon Hwang and Donghyun Choi

The purpose of this study is to examine the current open innovation practices in the public sector of leading countries.

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8433

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the current open innovation practices in the public sector of leading countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a framework based on the role of the government in open innovation, this study analyses a profile of early open innovation adopters based on collected data from secondary sources.

Findings

First, the USA, Australia and Singapore developed open innovation policies at the national level, facilitating a positive innovation climate. Many projects, especially those in online platforms, were established under these policies. Second, although outside‐in open innovation principles seem to be popular, there have been emerging attempts to exploit the value of government data through inside‐out approaches.

Research limitations/implications

Most governments are in the early stages of adoption of open innovation and are in the process of understanding relevant issues. Future research should investigate how governments adopt open innovation, in particular inside‐out initiatives.

Practical implications

Governments should develop an overarching strategic plan, which would help its employees to recognise that new change is consistent with the needs of their workplace practices. Some organizations and projects led by citizens help the government engage external ideas in solving issues that are beyond its control.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to examine the current open innovation policies at the government level.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Shenja van der Graaf, Le Anh Nguyen Long and Carina Veeckman

Abstract

Details

Co-creation and Smart Cities: Looking Beyond Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-602-2

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Krithika Randhawa, Emmanuel Josserand, Jochen Schweitzer and Danielle Logue

This research paper aims to examine how open innovation (OI) intermediaries facilitate knowledge collaboration between organizations and online user communities. Drawing…

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2388

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to examine how open innovation (OI) intermediaries facilitate knowledge collaboration between organizations and online user communities. Drawing on a Community of Practice (CoP) perspective on knowledge, the study lays out a framework of the knowledge boundary management mechanisms (and associated practices) that intermediaries deploy in enabling client organizations to engage in online community-based OI.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on an exploratory case study of an OI intermediary and 18 client organizations that engage with online user communities on the intermediary’s platform. Results incorporate both the intermediary and clients’ perspective, based on analysis of intermediary and client interviews, clients’ online community projects and other archival data.

Findings

Results reveal that OI intermediaries deploy three knowledge boundary management mechanisms – syntactic, semantic and pragmatic – each underpinned by a set of practices. Together, these mechanisms enable knowledge transfer, translation and transformation, respectively, and thus lead to cumulatively richer knowledge collaboration outcomes at the organization–community boundary. The findings show that the pragmatic mechanism reinforces both semantic and syntactic mechanisms, and is hence the most critical to achieving effective knowledge collaboration in community-based OI settings.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that OI intermediaries have to implement all three boundary management mechanisms to successfully enable knowledge collaboration for community-based OI. More specifically, intermediaries need to expand their focus beyond the development of digital platforms, to include nuanced efforts at building organizational commitment to community engagement.

Originality/value

Drawing on the CoP view, this study integrates the knowledge management literature into the OI literature to conceptualize the role of OI intermediaries in shaping knowledge collaboration between organizations and communities. In engaging with the interactive nature of knowledge exchange in such multi-actor settings, this research extends the firm-centric theorization of knowledge that currently dominates the existing OI research.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Zhanna Belyaeva, S.M. Riad Shams, Gabriele Santoro and Balakrishna Grandhi

This literature review paper attempts to discuss and present one’s current knowledge on the wide spectrum of stakeholder relationship management, to highlight future…

Abstract

Purpose

This literature review paper attempts to discuss and present one’s current knowledge on the wide spectrum of stakeholder relationship management, to highlight future research opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a literature review methodology involving different streams of research.

Findings

Diverse and distinct sections concerning stakeholder relationship management with specific regard to corporate governance and CSR, entrepreneurship and open innovation/open social innovation are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper presents future research opportunities concerning the wide spectrum of stakeholder relationship management.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Oscar Tamburis and Isabella Bonacci

The growing success of open innovation practices in many firms raises the question of whether such principles can be transferred for reinventing public sector…

Abstract

Purpose

The growing success of open innovation practices in many firms raises the question of whether such principles can be transferred for reinventing public sector organisations. A paradigm based on principles of integrated collaboration, co-created shared value, cultivated innovation ecosystems, unleashed exponential technologies and extraordinarily rapid adoption is the so-called Open Innovation 2.0. The development of this approach reflects the perception that the innovation process has evolved. This study aims to explore new ways to study healthcare networks as key tool for innovation creation and spreading, by deploying the emergent paradigm of Open Innovation 2.0.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates the impact of clusters, or localised networks, involving industrial, academic and institutional players, in the (bio)pharmaceutical setting; the aim is to enrich the line of inquiry into cluster-based innovation by applying a social network analysis (SNA) methodology, with the aim to provide new perspectives for recognising how the set of interactions and relationships in the (bio)pharmaceutical context can lead to higher levels of knowledge transfer, organisational learning and innovation spreading.

Findings

Starting from the top ten (bio)pharmaceutical companies, and the top ten contract research organisations (CROs), the study helps understand that: the combination of the single big pharma company and the CROs to which great part of the work is externalised, can be compared to a community of transaction that deals with the supply and demand of a specific kind of goods and services; clusters can comprise either a single one or more communities of transaction; virtual CROs act as a community whose all components participate to the creation of value (co-creation), thus comparable to a certain extent to a community of fantasy.

Originality/value

Based on the novelty of the OI2/SNA combination approach to deal with the “complex” (bio)pharmaceutical industry, the outcomes of the present study mean to highlight: a comprehensive perspective for understanding the dynamics of modularity and their implications for innovation networks; the presence of innovation networks as main mean to promote and support paths of knowledge creation and transfer.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Karen M. Gross Lopes, Marie Anne Macadar and Edimara Mezzomo Luciano

The relationship between citizens and government has been gradually changing from government centered to citizen centered. These changes can be understood from the public…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between citizens and government has been gradually changing from government centered to citizen centered. These changes can be understood from the public value perspective, which is a promising way to foster the use of electronic services (e-services) by citizens. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how key drivers for public value creation can enhance adopting electronic public services by citizens. The use of e-services as a basis for applying smart technologies is also discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study based on both a systematic literature review and a case study of an e-service provided by a Brazilian state government.

Findings

The study identifies that creating public value happens only after adopting e-services and that public value can be perceived directly by those who use the service or indirectly by the observation of people who have adopted it. A two-dimensional framework showing the direct and indirect factors that drive public value creation is proposed based on the data collection and literature review.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed conceptual framework remains untested and the data collection in the Brazilian context might be a limitation. Other studies could gather data based on the collective uses of e-services.

Originality/value

The framework can be used in other studies concerning public value creation. Public managers might consider its drivers when planning e-services as a way to link them to social, political and collective issues in addition to smart technologies.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Mokter Hossain and Ilkka Kauranen

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the development of crowdsourcing literature.

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5347

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the development of crowdsourcing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a comprehensive review of 346 articles on crowdsourcing. Both statistical and contents analyses were conducted in this paper.

Findings

ISI listed journal articles, non-ISI listed journal articles and conference articles have had nearly the same contribution in crowdsourcing literature. Articles published in non-ISI listed journals have had an essential role in the initial theory development related to crowdsourcing. Scholars from the USA have authored approximately the same number of articles as scholars from all the European countries combined. Scholars from developing countries have been more relatively active in authoring conference articles than journal articles. Only very recently, top-tier journals have engaged in publishing on crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing has proven to be beneficial in many tasks, but the extant literature does not give much help to practitioners in capturing value from crowdsourcing. Despite understanding that the motivations of crowds are crucial when planning crowdsourcing activities, the various motivations in different contexts have not been explored sufficiently. A major concern has been the quality and accuracy of information that has been gathered through crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing bears a lot of unused potential. For example, it can increase employment opportunities to low-income people in developing countries. On the other hand, more should be known of fair ways to organize crowdsourcing so that solution seekers do not get a chance to exploit individuals committing to provide solutions.

Research limitations/implications

The literature included in the study is extensive, but an all-inclusive search for articles was limited to only nine selected publishers. However, in addition to the articles retrieved from the nine selected publishers, 52 highly cited articles were also included from other publishers.

Practical implications

Crowdsourcing has much unused potential, and the use of crowdsourcing is increasing rapidly. The study provides a thematic review of various applications of crowdsourcing.

Originality/value

The study is the first of its kind to explore the development of crowdsourcing literature, discussing the loci and foci of extant articles and listing applications of crowdsourcing. Successful applications of crowdsourcing include idea generation, microtasking, citizen science, public participation, wikies, open source software and citizen journalism.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Yannis Charalabidis, Euripidis N. Loukis, Aggeliki Androutsopoulou, Vangelis Karkaletsis and Anna Triantafillou

The purpose of this study is to develop a novel approach to e-participation, which is based on “passive crowdsourcing” by government agencies, exploiting the extensive…

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1272

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a novel approach to e-participation, which is based on “passive crowdsourcing” by government agencies, exploiting the extensive political content continuously created in numerous Web 2.0 social media (e.g. political blogs and microblogs, news sharing sites and online forums) by citizens without government stimulation, to understand better their needs, issues, opinions, proposals and arguments concerning a particular domain of government activity or public policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This approach is developed and elaborated through cooperation with potential users experienced in the design of public policies from three countries (Austria, Greece and the UK), using a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques: co-operative development of application scenarios, questionnaire surveys, focus groups and workshops and, finally, in-depth interviews.

Findings

A process model for the application of the proposed passive crowdsourcing approach has been developed, which is quite different from the one of the usual active crowdsourcing. Based on it, the functional architecture of the required supporting information and communication technologies (ICT) infrastructure has been formulated, and then its technological architecture has been designed, addressing the conflicting requirements: low response time and, at the same time, provision of sufficiently “fresh” content for policymakers.

Practical implications

Taking into account that traditionally government agencies monitor what the press writes about them, our research provides a basis for extending efficiently these activities in the new electronic media world (e.g. newspapers websites, blogs and microblogs, online forums, etc.) to understand better the needs, issues, opinions, arguments and proposals raised by the society with respect to important domains of government activity and public policies.

Social implications

The proposed approach provides a new channel for the “voice” of the society to be directly communicated to the government so that the latter can design its policies and activities based on the social needs and realities and not on oversimplified models and stereotypes.

Originality/value

Our paper proposes a novel approach to e-participation, which exploits the Web 2.0 social media – but in a quite different way from previous approaches – for conducting “passive crowdsourcing”, and elaborates it: it develops an application process model for it and also an ICT infrastructure for supporting it, which are quite different from the ones of the existing “active crowdsourcing” approaches.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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