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Article

Christy R. Stevens and Patricia J. Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the concepts of lifelong learning, information literacy, and global citizenship, making explicit connections among them…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the concepts of lifelong learning, information literacy, and global citizenship, making explicit connections among them via theories of social capital. It then presents a model of librarian‐faculty collaboration that relies upon information literacy as a framework for fostering lifelong learning and global citizenship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a theoretical analysis of lifelong learning, information literacy, global citizenship, and social capital in order to provide a conceptual framework for the case study that follows. The case study describes the librarian‐faculty collaboration, which included the development of course goals, the syllabus, learning outcomes and objectives, assignments, course‐integrated library instruction sessions, and assessment tools.

Findings

Social capital is a useful theoretical tool for conceptualizing pedagogical strategies for promoting information literacy and global citizenship. Pre‐ and post‐tests, questionnaires, assignments, and student reflections indicate that the three primary goals of the collaboration were met. By the end of the course, students' IL competencies improved, students had developed a better understanding of their roles as global citizens, and students were more aware of the connections among global citizenship, lifelong learning, and information literacy.

Practical implications

The paper provides practical ideas for librarian‐faculty collaboration and for integrating information literacy competencies into assignment sequences.

Originality/value

The paper uses social capital theory to make connections among lifelong learning, information literacy, and global citizenship as well as to argue for the value and import of librarian‐faculty collaborations. It also describes a successful librarian‐faculty collaboration in the context of a Global Studies course.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Rita Marcella and Graeme Baxter

This paper reports the results of the second stage of the Citizenship Information research project funded by the BLR&IC: a nation‐wide survey, by personal doorstep…

Abstract

This paper reports the results of the second stage of the Citizenship Information research project funded by the BLR&IC: a nation‐wide survey, by personal doorstep interview, of the citizenship information needs of almost 900 members of the UK public. Major findings include: that the public obtain most of their information on current issues via the mass media, and that they generally feel well informed on these issues. The public feel, however, that government is not doing enough to inform them on European Monetary Union and on local government cutbacks. Small proportions of the sample had encountered problems concerning employment, education, housing or welfare benefits, and had consulted a range of information sources in order to overcome these problems. Over a quarter of respondents had experienced disadvantage through a lack of access to information. The majority of respondents felt well informed about areas relating to citizenship, but significant proportions were poorly informed in legal rights, welfare benefits and local politics. A highly significant majority (91.7 per cent) believed that freedom of information was important for exercising their rights as citizens. Respondents tended to overestimate their voting patterns, but there was little evidence of participation in other forms of political activity. Although access to computers in the home is presently limited, the majority of respondents would use computers to vote, convey opinions to government and obtain government information. Public libraries were the preferred source of government information, and were seen as appropriate locations for a range of other types of citizenship information.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 56 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article

Johanna Rivano Eckerdal

The purpose of this paper is to advocate and contribute to a more nuanced and discerning argument when ascribing a democratic role to libraries and activities related to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advocate and contribute to a more nuanced and discerning argument when ascribing a democratic role to libraries and activities related to information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The connections between democracy and libraries as well as between citizenship and information literacy are analysed by using Mouffe’s agonistic pluralism. One example is provided by a recent legislative change (the new Swedish Library Act) and the documents preceding it. A second, more detailed example concerns how information literacy may be conceptualised when related to young women’s sexual and reproductive health. Crucial in both examples are the suggestions of routes to travel that support equality and inclusion for all.

Findings

Within an agonistic approach, democracy concerns equality and interest in making efforts to include the less privileged. The inclusion of a democratic aim, directed towards everyone, for libraries in the new Library Act can be argued to emphasise the political role of libraries. A liberal and a radical understanding of information literacy is elaborated, the latter is advocated. Information literacy is also analysed in a non-essentialist manner, as a description of a learning activity, therefore always value-laden.

Originality/value

The agonistic reading of two central concepts in library and information studies, namely, libraries and information literacy is fruitful and shows how the discipline may contribute to strengthen democracy in society both within institutions as libraries and in other settings.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article

Rita Marcella and Graeme Baxter

This paper reports the results of a survey of information needs and information seeking behaviour of a national sample of the UK population. The survey was the first stage…

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a survey of information needs and information seeking behaviour of a national sample of the UK population. The survey was the first stage of the Citizenship Information project, funded by the British Library Research and Innovation Centre. In total, 1294 responses were received giving a valid and demographically representative response rate of 45.7 per cent. Major findings include: that the majority of respondents had sought information in the past (59.4 per cent) and that an even greater number predicted a future need for information (78.4 per cent). Over three quarters of respondents said that they would use public libraries and between half and three quarters would approach Citizens Advice Bureaux, Post Offices, Government departments or family and friends. Face‐to‐face communications and reading a book were the most popular means of accessing information, but a wide variety of other preferred options were cited. Only a small proportion expressed a preference for using a computer to seek information, and there was a clear emphasis on public libraries as an appropriate location for accessing electronic information. A highly significant majority (79.2 per cent) believed that access to information was very important for exercising their rights as a citizen.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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Article

Rita Marcella and Graeme Baxter

This paper reports the results of a survey of information needs and information seeking behaviour of a national sample of the UK population. The project was funded by the…

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a survey of information needs and information seeking behaviour of a national sample of the UK population. The project was funded by the BLR&IC and comprised a survey by questionnaire covering all regions of the United Kingdom. 1,294 responses were received giving a valid and demographically representative response rate of 45.7 per cent. Major findings include: that the majority of respondents had sought information in the past (59.4 per cent) and that an even greater number predicted a future need for information (78.4 per cent). Over three quarters of respondents said that they would use public libraries and between half and three quarters would approach CABx, post offices, government departments or family and friends. Face to face communications and reading a book were the most popular means of accessing information but a wide variety of other preferred options were cited. Only a small proportion expressed a preference for using a computer to seek information and there was a clear emphasis on public libraries as an appropriate location for accessing computerised information. A highly significant majority (79.2 per cent) believed that access to information was very important for exercising their rights as citizens. Many significant variables, in terms of age, gender, status and region were found. In particular it was felt significant that young people were less sure of the importance of being able to access information.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part

Rosemeire Barbosa Tavares, Sely Maria de Souza Costa and Mark Hepworth

This qualitative study was carried out in Candangolaˆndia, in Brasilia’s surroundings, Brazil. It comprised procedures that aimed to test the use of participatory research…

Abstract

This qualitative study was carried out in Candangolaˆndia, in Brasilia’s surroundings, Brazil. It comprised procedures that aimed to test the use of participatory research and action (PRA) in interactive and multidirectional communication amongst community members, in order to enable them to work together in the identification, access and use of information to solve social problems. The assumption behind this proposal was that as doing so, citizens develop abilities of information literacy and capabilities of collaborative work. The research tested the efficacy of PRA specifically in information science, using principles of critical thinking and participatory techniques within an epistemological interpretative approach in the identification of community information needs, access and use. Specific techniques such as oral presentation, people introduction, cards, games, brainstorm, workgroups, discussion, and question and answer were applied in 24 activities performed during six meetings with an intentionally selected group of citizens. The set of activities in each meeting was related to the meeting objective. Data analysis was based on grounded theory principles, particularly the coding process. Findings confirmed that PRA is a suitable methodology to explore abilities of information literacy and attitudes of collaborative work as a result of an interactive and multidirectional communication. In fact, community participants were able to identify, classify and prioritise information needs, as well as use information solutions for a selected social problem. Ultimately, these actions have proved to be helpful for participants to develop a heightened sense of citizenship.

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

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Book part

Emily Ryo and Ian Peacock

In the current era of intensified immigration enforcement and heightened risks of deportation even for long-term lawful permanent residents, citizenship has taken on a new…

Abstract

In the current era of intensified immigration enforcement and heightened risks of deportation even for long-term lawful permanent residents, citizenship has taken on a new meaning and greater importance. There is also growing evidence that citizenship denials in their various forms have become inextricably linked to immigration enforcement. Who is denied citizenship, why, and under what circumstances? This chapter begins to address these questions by developing a typology of citizenship denials and providing an empirical overview of each type of citizenship denial. Taken together, the typology of citizenship denials and the accompanying empirical overview illustrate the close connection between immigration enforcement and citizenship rights in the United States.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of public libraries as institutions underpinning a democratic public sphere as reasons legitimizing libraries compared to reasons that are more traditional and the actual use of libraries as public sphere arenas.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of representative samples of the adult population in six countries – Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Germany, Hungary and Switzerland – was undertaken.

Findings

Legitimations related to the libraries role as a meeting place and arena for public debate are ranked as the 3 least important out of 12 possible legitimations for upholding a public library service. Libraries are, however, used extensively by the users to access citizenship information and to participate in public sphere relevant meetings.

Originality/value

Few studies have empirically analyzed the role of libraries in upholding a democratic and sustainable public sphere. This study contributes in filling that gap.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part

Diantha Schull

In recent years there has been growing discussion in the library community regarding the civic role of the public library. The discussion is rooted in a deep-seated…

Abstract

In recent years there has been growing discussion in the library community regarding the civic role of the public library. The discussion is rooted in a deep-seated professional commitment to the value of the public library as an institution of democratic society. As a recent president of the American Library Association, Nancy Kranich, wrote in 2001, “Libraries serve the most fundamental ideals of our society as uniquely democratic institutions. As far back as the nineteenth century, libraries were hailed as institutions that schooled citizens in the conduct of democratic life.” (p. vi).

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-005-0

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Article

Jerry Chih‐Ching Chiang, Ming‐Hsien Yang, Gary Klein and James Jiunn‐Yih Jiang

The purpose of this paper is to understand how perceptions of fair treatment impact voluntary behaviors of information technology (IT) professionals beneficial to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how perceptions of fair treatment impact voluntary behaviors of information technology (IT) professionals beneficial to the achievement of organizational goals. Specifically, social exchange and psychological contract theory provide a framework to consider whether equitable treatment of employees and preservation of implied contracts are indicators of beneficial, extra‐role behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a questionnaire targeting IT professionals to test a model derived from theory and prior IT personnel literature.

Findings

IT employees reciprocate demonstrations of equity and maintenance of implied contracts by added beneficial behaviors not explicit to their job requirements. This relationship is partially mediated by their trust held in the organization.

Research limitations/implications

This study considered two related but distinct social exchange concepts in the same model of IT personnel behavior that had previously been considered independently indicating the need to consider both in future models. Generalizations of the observed result are limited by the use of cross‐sectional data from a single culture.

Practical implications

Managers of IT personnel must design and implement procedures that guarantee equitable distribution of resources and rewards. Management honoring contacts that are merely implicit and derived internally by the IT employee is crucial in promoting beneficial behaviors that fall outside explicit job requirements.

Originality/value

The paper highlights how IT employees reciprocate in the technology work environment. In exchange for an organization honoring contracts that are merely perceived and providing an equitable structure, IT professionals are willing to go beyond required job descriptions to achieve goals.

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