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1 – 10 of 257
Article
Publication date: 12 January 2022

Zhaoyu Chen and Irene Cheng Chu Chan

This study examined a tourism destination, Macao, a fast-progressing smart city under development, vis-à-vis a set of smart city quality of life (SCQOL) domains and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined a tourism destination, Macao, a fast-progressing smart city under development, vis-à-vis a set of smart city quality of life (SCQOL) domains and verified their effects on citizens' attitudes, perceptions and support for citizen-centric smart city development (SCD).

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a quantitative approach. In particular, a questionnaire survey was used to collect data from Macao citizens. Factor analysis was used to identify SCQOL domains, while multiple linear regression and cluster analysis were used to achieve the research objectives.

Findings

This study identified five SCQOL domains: smart environment, smart people, smart livelihood, smart economy and economic policy, and smart mobility. Each of the domains had a different influence on citizens' attitudes and support for SCD. Three citizen segments (passive, neutral and enthusiastic supporters) were identified.

Practical implications

The five SCQOL domains, their effects on citizens' support for SCD and the three citizen segments identified can help implement the appropriate measures to enhance the target groups' SCD. The findings are also of practical value in evaluating the citizen-centric approaches on smart progress in other contexts.

Originality/value

The concept of smart technology has been widely applied to all aspects of city development. The main goal of SCD is to enhance citizens' quality of life. However, most studies have only explored smart cities and quality of life in isolation. Grounded on citizen centrality, this study contributes to the literature on SCD by proposing a new concept of SCQOL, identifying the domains constituting SCQOL and their influence on citizens' support for SCD.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Yannick Thomas van Hierden, Timo Dietrich and Sharyn Rundle-Thiele

This study aims to demonstrate how banks can align their CSR investment to community needs and citizen preferences. A grounded theory inductive approach is applied to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to demonstrate how banks can align their CSR investment to community needs and citizen preferences. A grounded theory inductive approach is applied to deliver a community-centred process that banks can apply to inform CSR investment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a sequential mixed-method research design to identify areas of need from the perspective of community leaders and members through depth interviews. Following thematic analysis, citizen preferences for eight priority areas were elicited using best-worst scaling (BWS).

Findings

Clear investment preferences emerged with citizens preferring six community investment causes, namely, (1) infrastructure, (2) crisis and prevention support, (3) community groups, (4) youth facilities and activities, (5) initiatives that support the local environment, and (6) physical activity promotion. The forming of community advisory committees emerged as one approach that banks could apply to ensure long-term citizen-centred CSR investment decisions.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to one community and one community bank and a small convenience, cross-sectional data sample.

Social implications

Community-oriented financial institutions should centre investment decisions on community need and citizen preferences ensuring investments made deliver the greatest societal benefit and community support for the banks is garnered.

Originality/value

This paper provides important contributions to improve the effectiveness of CSR initiatives, providing an inductive, methodological approach that financial institutions can follow to better align their CSR investment to community needs and preferences.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Debjani Bhattacharya, Umesh Gulla and M.P. Gupta

E‐government implementation evolves through different stages of maturity, enforcing changes in strategies at each level. The transitions of service maturity phases pose…

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Abstract

Purpose

E‐government implementation evolves through different stages of maturity, enforcing changes in strategies at each level. The transitions of service maturity phases pose continuous challenges to service providers in assessing the e‐service quality of web‐based services used in government. This study is conducted to propose a multi item scale for assessing the e‐service quality of government portals involving transactions.

Design/methodology/approach

Factors influencing the e‐service quality of government portals were identified from an extensive review of research performed by academic scholars and practitioners. A questionnaire was designed based on a review and interviews with users of e‐government applications and was used to conduct a survey of fully operational portals. Responses were obtained and quantitative analyses were performed on the data to develop a scale. This scale can help in evaluating citizen perceived quality of e‐services.

Findings

Seven constructs – i.e. citizen centricity, transaction transparency, technical adequacy, usability, complete information, privacy and security and usefulness of information – were identified from the analyses, which can be used to assess the demand side service quality of government portals.

Practical implications

Despite a well‐structured, national‐level plan on e‐government and adequate funding in India, most of the projects under the scheme are far below the expectation level of citizens. Technology‐enabled applications have promised easy access to government services with economic gain in certain cases, but they have not ensured citizens' satisfaction. Improved service quality based on citizens' need and expectation can reduce the gap between design and reality and act as positive trigger for adoption of e‐government. This study can help government portal developers get an insight into users' needs to improve the design and implementation of online services. The issues are significant and cannot be overlooked in practice.

Originality/value

The paper is original and a research study. It provides an understanding of citizens' perceived quality of e‐services and adoption behavior within the framework of the web‐based environment of government services.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Njabulo Ndlovu, Nixon Muganda Ochara and Robert Martin

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of digital government innovation on transformational government. Digital government innovation is ordinarily…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of digital government innovation on transformational government. Digital government innovation is ordinarily implemented as means for the creation of public value. However, realisation of benefits from the digital government platforms has proved to be a challenge, and great discrepancy has been observed in the extent of public value generated, pointing to lack of innovativeness in resource-constrained environments. This research investigates the influence of digital government ambidexterity as an innovation strategy in enhancing transformational government (T-Gov). The authors develop hypotheses relating to digital government ambidexterity with two factors of innovation for enhancing T-Gov: exploitation incremental digital innovation and exploration radical digital innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested using a sample size of 690 citizens interacting through digital government platforms. The authors identify exploitation incremental digital innovation and exploration radical digital innovation as factors, and how these factors of digital government ambidexterity influence information quality for public value creation. The success of T-Gov is associated to the implementation of digital government policy which moderate the relationship between digital government ambidexterity and information quality.

Findings

The empirical outcomes suggest that exploitation incremental digital innovation and exploration radical digital innovation positively influence information quality, thereby leading to public value, and this result become successful if there is implementation of digital government policy. Treating the two factors of digital government innovation as complementary leads to public value creation.

Research limitations/implications

Limited time and funds to conduct a country comparative study. The study only focused on urban municipalities, of which it would be interesting to explore rural municipalities.

Practical implications

Adoption of MunINFORQUAL model for promoting digital government platform utilisation by citizens.

Social implications

The utilisation of digital government platforms would improve citizens’ lives in a number of ways. For instance, citizen municipal interaction for service delivery and social benefits through instant notifications of developmental projects.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the research literature on digital government innovation particularly from resource-constrained environments. Also, the study provides new empirical test using a data set of 690 citizens interacting through digital government platforms.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Robin Ryde

This paper introduces the findings of an unusual international endeavour that combines action research with leadership development for 40 senior officials from Australia…

Abstract

This paper introduces the findings of an unusual international endeavour that combines action research with leadership development for 40 senior officials from Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the UK. The four nation Leadership Across Borders programme, co‐delivered by the governments' business schools of each country, set out to explore and understand some of the most significant facets of public service ranging from citizen engagement to whole‐of‐government complexity, and from the economic downturn to crisis management. Over the 10 months of the programme, the senior group engaged with heads of the public service, leading academics, delivery experts, leaders of civic society and scores of street level service users. This paper highlights the critical importance of understanding complexity and the role of ‘systems thinking’ in dealing with modern problems. But it also points to a new order of innovation required of leaders if they are to bring value to problems such as deprivation and global financial crises, and if they are to successfully bring about citizen‐centred services in increasingly complex societies.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Kinga Zdunek, Michael Rigby, Shalmali Deshpande and Denise Alexander

The child is at the centre of all Models of Child Health Appraised research and indeed all primary care delivery for children. Appraising models of primary care for…

Abstract

The child is at the centre of all Models of Child Health Appraised research and indeed all primary care delivery for children. Appraising models of primary care for children is incomplete without ensuring that experiences of primary care, design, treatment, management and outcomes are optimal for the child. However, the principle of child centricity is not implicit in many healthcare systems and in many aspects of life, yet it is extremely important for optimal child health service design and child health. By exploring the changing concept of ‘childhood’, we understand better the emergence of the current attitude towards children and their role in today’s Europe and the evolution of child rights. Understanding child centricity, and the role of agents acting on behalf of the child, allows us to identify features of children’s primary care systems that uphold the rights of a child to optimum health. This is placed against the legal commitments made by the countries of the European Union and European Economic Area to ensure that children’s rights are respected.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Alexander R.M. Schellong

The purpose of this paper is to offer insights and suggestions for the design of existing and future e‐government benchmarks.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer insights and suggestions for the design of existing and future e‐government benchmarks.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents several frameworks to structure the discussion of e‐government benchmark design based on a review of existing research and practice. Second, it provides an overview of relevant benchmarking activities including new insights on the European Union's (EU's) benchmarking activities. Finally, suggestions for the future design of the EU's benchmarking are made.

Findings

The scope of prominent e‐government benchmarks is mostly on the supply/output side and a development stage model of a selection of government (online) services. Benchmarks follow underlying cause‐and‐effect frameworks. Capturing government transformation also remains a core challenge. To discuss the design of e‐government benchmarks, a three‐tier structure is proposed: guiding principles, benchmark methodology, and reporting and learning. Overall, governments around the globe are facing significant changes in the coming years which will shape their thinking on digital government in general and the priorities for benchmarking it in particular. Among others, these are the trade‐off between free market and regulation, demographic change and the information economy.

Practical implications

The paper provides policy makers and consultants with a framework to approach and discuss e‐government benchmarks in general and the future design of the EU e‐government benchmark in particular.

Originality/value

The paper analyzes existing e‐government benchmarks, presents a framework for designing e‐government benchmarks and makes a range of recommendations on changes to the methodology of the EU e‐government benchmark.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Nihar Amoncar

The paper intends to explore the role and function of citizen-led social media forums in the marketing of political discourse. Using the entrepreneurial marketing (EM…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper intends to explore the role and function of citizen-led social media forums in the marketing of political discourse. Using the entrepreneurial marketing (EM) perspective of “co-creation of value”, this paper aims to explore the manner in which consumers of political communications in a specific region have created user generated value via setting up Facebook forums to manage the risk created by fake news and the trust deficit between citizens and mainstream media (MSM).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a “netnographic” approach to investigation and the data is analysed manual coding (Kozinets, 2015). Facebook groups form the virtual research field in in the context of this study. This approach is adopted because in a social media environment, netnography capitalises over a growing virtual and online communities and allows researchers to study the richness of these online communities (Mkono and Markwell, 2014).

Findings

The study provides insights on how administrators and moderators of Facebook groups create value for other users by identifying and communicating the risks emerging from social media-based political communication. The study finds that such citizen-led initiatives act as online social aggregators. The value that such groups offer its users/members resides within a well-bound, controlled and moderated online medium that encourages users to counter fake news and misinformation – thereby solving a key problem within the user market i.e. citizen-media trust deficit.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses a qualitative, netnographic approach and the emerging insights cannot be generalised. The emergent findings are specific to the context of this study and researchers are encouraged to further test the propositions emerging from this research in varied contexts.

Practical implications

The study extends the application of EM in political contexts using the seven dimensions of EM, which will provide impetus for future political campaigns in terms of unique value creation for publics. The paper also emerges with the role citizen-initiated forums can play in the effective dissemination of digital political communication as user generated content is aiding political debate.

Social implications

The study helps highlight the role Facebook forums can play in informing the political discourse within a region. The general distrust amongst the citizens over information produced by MSM has meant vocal critics have taken to Facebook to provide their subjective opinions. Although the findings of this study show that such forums can help identify “fake news” and help citizens discuss and debate the truth, it can also become an avenue to manage propaganda amongst the “unaware” citizens. This paper flags up the issues and benefits of using Facebook forums and in conclusion relates them to similar occurrences of the past to make society aware of the pitfalls of managed propaganda.

Originality/value

The paper takes initiative in investigating the use of social media in politics from the citizens’ perspective, which is comparatively marginalised against the number of studies taking place, which investigate the political party end use of social media for political marketing.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Sandra Cohen and Sotirios Karatzimas

This study examines the reporting practices of a sample of awarded smart cities that report in English by analyzing the financial and non-financial reports published in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the reporting practices of a sample of awarded smart cities that report in English by analyzing the financial and non-financial reports published in their websites.

Design/methodology/approach

The study performs a manifest content analysis on the financial and non-financial reports published by a sample of awarded – by various networks and organizations – smart cities. Integrated Popular Reporting that builds on Integrated Reporting, Popular Reporting and ICT advancements is used as the reference paradigm to analyze the content and the characteristics of these reports.

Findings

The results indicate that smart cities' reports are mainly developed conventionally and do not embed technological advancements. However, there are several smart cities that adopt a reporting paradigm where the five capitals of Integrated Reporting, over and above the financial one, are discussed.

Originality/value

Systematizing the way the existing reports of smart cities are developed provides evidence whether smart cities adopt reporting means that are consistent with their character, as well as, the specific areas they should focus to achieve that. Toward this end, collaborations between citizens and smart city councils, in the philosophy of co-production and co-creation of public value, could prove helpful in the development of useful reports.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Keld Pedersen

The purpose of this paper is to increase our understanding of the requirements for public sector organizations to implement benefits realization practices. The research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase our understanding of the requirements for public sector organizations to implement benefits realization practices. The research compares benefits realization practices as suggested by the literature with actual practice with the goal of identifying both insufficiencies in the current literature and challenges in practice that must be overcome to improve the current situation.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study approach is used to study benefits realization across national and local government organizations.

Findings

Five major challenges that are not dealt with by existing literature were identified: benefits realization requires not just organizational capabilities, but also inter-organizational capabilities; coordination of benefits realization across organizational units, local and central government and across internal organizational levels is both essential and very challenging; managing benefits realization includes much more than integrating benefits realization practices in IT projects; different benefits realization practices are needed at central government level, local management level and case worker level; and different uses of technology require different levels of benefits realization capabilities and different practices. The case also illustrates that under certain conditions, organization can actually realize significant improvements with limited benefits realization capabilities: When IT is used not to change but to fully automate processes, the reliance on formal benefits realization practices is decreased.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on a single case.

Originality/value

There is only little empirical research studying benefits realization in a public sector context. Furthermore, the research studies benefits realization from an organizational process perspective, and not from the perspective of IT projects.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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