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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Har Singh

The purpose of this paper is to explore the journal bibliometric characteristics of Collection Building and the subject relationship with other disciplines by citation analysis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the journal bibliometric characteristics of Collection Building and the subject relationship with other disciplines by citation analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explores the distribution of articles and subjects of references and analyses the various aspects of Collection Building from 2005‐2012. There are 179 articles in Collection Building in eight selected years. In total, 32 issues pertaining to eight volumes of Collection Building were consulted and relevant details of the citations at the end of each article were noted on an excel sheet. The recorded data were analysed, interpreted and tabulated.

Findings

The results of this study revealed that 179 articles were consulted from eight volumes (2005‐2012) which carried 2,388 citations including 85 self‐citations. The majority of articles (30.17 per cent) recorded between 10‐19 range of citations per article followed by (28.50 per cent) 1‐9 range. The majority of articles were contributed by single authors (65.92 per cent) and majority of contributors were from the USA (69.96 per cent) followed by Canada (3.95 per cent) and India (3.95 per cent) respectively. Journal articles (42.71 per cent) were the most cited source materials, followed by online and electronic sources (25.80 per cent), books including edited books (20.44 per cent), newspapers (5.23 per cent) and so on. Out of 179 articles, tje majority of articles (33.52 per cent) were Research papers followed by Case study (30.73 per cent), Literature review (12.85 per cent) and so on. The majority of articles (66.48 per cent) were recorded between 6‐10 pages, followed by 25.70 per cent articles between 1‐5 pages. Out of 1,020 journal articles, Collection Building (9.02 per cent) was the top ranked journal, followed by The Journal of Academic Librarianship (5.0 per cent) and College & Research Libraries (4.22 per cent).

Research limitations/implications

Research was limited to the journal entitled Collection Building during eight years (2005‐2012). In total, 32 issues and 179 articles were covered by the study.

Originality/value

The outcome of the study is an original research work with citation analysis of Collection Building. It highlights the study of 179 articles of Collection Building in various ways.

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Koteppa Banateppanavar, Dharanikumar P and Vindya A B

The present paper aims at analyzing the research output performance of library and information science (LIS) professionals. Citation analysis of all the journal articles…

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper aims at analyzing the research output performance of library and information science (LIS) professionals. Citation analysis of all the journal articles published in the Collection Building journal during 2009-2012 is carried out.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were drawn from a selective sample of a free e-journal, i.e. Collection Building, available through the Kuvempu University Web site without subscription or registration. A total of 91 articles published during 2009 to 2012 with 1,302 citations. The analysis cover mainly the number of articles, authorship pattern, subject-wise distribution of articles, average number of references per articles, forms of documents cited, rank list of journals, Bradford’s law.

Findings

The study reveals that journals (53.84 per cent of citations) are the most preferred sources of information used by the researchers in the field of LIS. It is followed by Web resources with 24.27 per cent, these two together constitute 78.11 per cent of total citations and remaining 21.89 per cent of citations from books, proceedings, theses, reports and gazetteer. Collection Building (USA) has ranked first with 68 (9.70 per cent) citations. Further, Bradford’s law of scattering was applied. It is observed that major citations are from journal literature. In addition, more cited materials were contributed by multi-authors, and degree of collaboration is 0.44.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a sense of the importance of LIS research, and as such, informs the community and researchers involved in the citation analysis.

Originality/value

The outcome of the study is an original research work with citation analysis of LIS publications. The study highlights the information materials available and used by researchers in the field of LIS, and those that need to be added for a healthy collection.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Björn Hammarfelt

In this article, the ideas and methods behind the “patent-paper citation” are scrutinised by following the intellectual and technical development of approaches and ideas…

Abstract

Purpose

In this article, the ideas and methods behind the “patent-paper citation” are scrutinised by following the intellectual and technical development of approaches and ideas in early work on patentometrics. The aim is to study how references from patents to papers came to play a crucial role in establishing a link between science and technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprises a conceptual history of the “patent paper citation” and its emergence as an important indicator of science and technology interaction. By tracing key references in the field, it analyses the overarching frameworks and ideas, the conceptual “hinterland”, in which the approach of studying patent references emerged.

Findings

The analysis explains how interest in patents – not only as legal and economic artefacts but also as scientific documents – became evident in the 1980s. The focus on patent citations was sparked by a need for relevant and objective indicators and by the greater availability of databases and methods. Yet, the development of patentometrics also relied on earlier research, and established theories, on the relation between science and technology.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt at situating patentometrics in a larger societal and scientific context. The paper offers a reflexive and nuanced analysis of the “patent-paper citation” as a theoretical and historical construct, and it calls for a broader and contextualised understanding of patent references, including their social, legal and rhetorical function.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Björn Hammarfelt

The aim of this article is to study a locally‐oriented and book‐based research field using two Swedish language sources. Knowledge about citation patterns outside…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to study a locally‐oriented and book‐based research field using two Swedish language sources. Knowledge about citation patterns outside journal‐based, English language databases is scarce; thus a substantial part of research in the humanities and the social sciences is neglected in bibliometric studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Citation characteristics (publication type, language, gender and age) in the journal Tidskrift för Litteraturvetenskap (2000‐2009) and in grant applications (2006‐2009) are studied. The datasets are analyzed further, adopting an author‐co‐citation approach for depicting and comparing the “intellectual base” of the field.

Findings

It is shown that monographs and anthologies are the main publication channel in Swedish literary research. English, followed by Swedish, is the major language, and the gender of authors seems to influence citation practices. Furthermore, a common intellectual base of literary studies that is independent of publication type and language could be identified.

Practical implications

Bibliometric analysis of fields within the humanities needs to go beyond established databases and materials. The extensive use of recent English language monographs in Swedish literary studies informs the acquisition policy of university libraries serving literature scholars.

Originality/value

Citation analysis of non‐English sources offers further knowledge about scholarly fields with a local and “rural” profile. The approach of using references in grant applications provides a novel and promising venue for bibliometric research.

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

Lutz Bornmann and Hans‐Dieter Daniel

The purpose of this paper is to present a narrative review of studies on the citing behavior of scientists, covering mainly research published in the last 15 years. Based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a narrative review of studies on the citing behavior of scientists, covering mainly research published in the last 15 years. Based on the results of these studies, the paper seeks to answer the question of the extent to which scientists are motivated to cite a publication not only to acknowledge intellectual and cognitive influences of scientific peers, but also for other, possibly non‐scientific, reasons.

Design/methodology/approach

The review covers research published from the early 1960s up to mid‐2005 (approximately 30 studies on citing behavior‐reporting results in about 40 publications).

Findings

The general tendency of the results of the empirical studies makes it clear that citing behavior is not motivated solely by the wish to acknowledge intellectual and cognitive influences of colleague scientists, since the individual studies reveal also other, in part non‐scientific, factors that play a part in the decision to cite. However, the results of the studies must also be deemed scarcely reliable: the studies vary widely in design, and their results can hardly be replicated. Many of the studies have methodological weaknesses. Furthermore, there is evidence that the different motivations of citers are “not so different or ‘randomly given’ to such an extent that the phenomenon of citation would lose its role as a reliable measure of impact”.

Originality/value

Given the increasing importance of evaluative bibliometrics in the world of scholarship, the question “What do citation counts measure?” is a particularly relevant and topical issue.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

YLVA LINDHOLM‐ROMANTSCHUK and JULIAN WARNER

The principal aim of this study is to examine the transmission of ideas across time in disciplines selected from the humanities and social sciences. Citation analysis is…

Abstract

The principal aim of this study is to examine the transmission of ideas across time in disciplines selected from the humanities and social sciences. Citation analysis is used to trace the diffusion of ideas as they are embodied in monographic publications. The study is part of a developing research programme and is intended to establish a framework to inform future developments. Four specific hypotheses are developed and tested. They are concerned with: the relative impact of monographs and journal articles produced within a discipline; the distinction between core and non‐core group monographs; the correlation between the reception and intellectual survival of a monograph; and the comparative level of impact of monographic and journal article publication by a single author. It is concluded that the presence of core or elite groups can be perceived in all aspects of the study. The validity of the methodologies employed is strengthened by the sharp distinctions between groups of monographs and of authors revealed by the analysis of data. Further analysis is needed to explore intra‐ and inter‐disciplinary diffusion of ideas over time in greater depth.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

MAURICE B. LINE and A. SANDISON

The term ‘obsolescence’ occurs frequently in the literature of librarianship and information science. In numerous papers we are told how most published literature becomes…

Abstract

The term ‘obsolescence’ occurs frequently in the literature of librarianship and information science. In numerous papers we are told how most published literature becomes obsolete within a measurable time, and that an item receives half the uses it will ever receive (‘half‐life’) in a few years. ‘Obsolescence’ is however very rarely defined, and its validity, interest, and practical value are often assumed rather than explained. Before reviewing studies on ‘obsolescence’, therefore, it is necessary to look at the concept and to identify the reasons why it should be of interest.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

MENGXIONG LIU

The use of bibliographic citation is a crucial aspect in the creation and dissemination of information. Numerous studies have been done ranging from simple citation counts…

Abstract

The use of bibliographic citation is a crucial aspect in the creation and dissemination of information. Numerous studies have been done ranging from simple citation counts to more complex bibliographic coupling studies, and from citation classifications to citation motivation studies. This review focusses on the citation studies that have explored the complexities and the underlying norms of the citation process. The major emphasis is placed upon the studies which have dealt with citation functions, citation quality, citation concepts and citation motivation. The international perspectives of citation practice are also discussed.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Nosrat Riahinia

The purpose of this paper is to analyze citation behaviors of students in the LIS field among a variety of local universities in Tehran.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze citation behaviors of students in the LIS field among a variety of local universities in Tehran.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 259 MA dissertations in Library and Information Science submitted to five universities in Tehran during 2003‐2008 are examined. These universities were selected based on their location and the authors' accessibility to their university libraries. Overall, five out of nine universities in Iran which have Masters Courses in Library and Information Science were selected for this study. The data were gathered using a checklist by the author, who personally attended in university libraries and counted all dissertation references.

Findings

The study shows that students' citation behaviors are in favor of books, and Farsi e‐sources are lesser used by LIS students than English e‐sources. The total number of book citations is far more than total number of other formats. While this study could be useful in library acquisition decisions, it could also inform in areas related to issues students face in finding suitable pieces of information.

Practical implications

This study would be useful for educational and acquisition purposes in university libraries, since it examines citation behavior of students through a specific discipline.

Originality/value

The study deals with MA Library and Information Science dissertations among all universities of Tehran that teach LIS masters courses.

Details

Library Review, vol. 59 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Bulu Maharana, Kalpana Nayak and N.K. Sahu

The essential purpose of this paper is to measure the amount of web resources used for scholarly contributions in the area of library and information science (LIS) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The essential purpose of this paper is to measure the amount of web resources used for scholarly contributions in the area of library and information science (LIS) in India. It further aims to make an analysis of the nature and type of web resources and studies the various standards for web citations.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the result of analysis of 292 web citations spread over 95 scholarly papers published in the proceedings of the National Conference of the Society for Information Science, India (SIS‐2005) has been reported. All the 292 web citations were scanned and data relating to types of web domains, file formats, styles of citations, etc., were collected through a structured check list. The data thus obtained were systematically analyzed, figurative representations were made and appropriate interpretations were drawn.

Findings

The study revealed that 292 (34.88 per cent) out of 837 were web citations, proving a significant correlation between the use of Internet resources and research productivity of LIS professionals in India. The highest number of web citations (35.6 per cent) was from .edu/.ac type domains. Most of the web resources (46.9 per cent) cited in the study were hypertext markup language (HTML) files.

Originality/value

The paper is the result of an original analysis of web citations undertaken in order to study the dependence of LIS professionals in India on web sources for their scholarly contributions. This carries research value for web content providers, authors and researchers in LIS.

Details

Library Review, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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