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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

B.G. Dale

Sixty‐seven British companies took part in a survey to determine causes of failure of quality circles. The main reasons determined were: rejection of the concept by top…

Abstract

Sixty‐seven British companies took part in a survey to determine causes of failure of quality circles. The main reasons determined were: rejection of the concept by top management and trade unions; the disruption caused by redundancies and company restructuring; labour turnover; lack of co‐operation from middle and first line management; and failure by circle leaders to find enough time to organise meetings. The author was optimistic about the findings since growth in the number of companies using circles and the average number of circles per company is still taking place.

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Management Research News, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

J. Cox and B.G. Dale

A questionnaire sent to facilitators of 12 engineering companies and thence distributed to operational blue‐collar circles resulted in a 68 per cent response rate and…

Abstract

A questionnaire sent to facilitators of 12 engineering companies and thence distributed to operational blue‐collar circles resulted in a 68 per cent response rate and established that the expectations, their realisation, the benefits, training, co‐operation and participation of all parties within an organisation are important to circle members. It is vital for management to demonstrate prescience and sensitivity to these areas when operating quality circles.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Michele Y. Burpeau‐Di Gregorio and John W. Dickson

Quality circles have become one of the most commonly used remedies to reverse the decline in productivity in business organisations. In this article, the authors draw upon…

Abstract

Quality circles have become one of the most commonly used remedies to reverse the decline in productivity in business organisations. In this article, the authors draw upon the experiences of quality circles in four US organisations in order to make some general observations.

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Employee Relations, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

B.G. Dale and S.G. Hayward

This is the second of a series of three articles dealing with Quality Circle failures. The concept of organisational readiness and implementation issues were discussed in…

Abstract

This is the second of a series of three articles dealing with Quality Circle failures. The concept of organisational readiness and implementation issues were discussed in Part I, while in Part II we focus on operational issues and the problem of maintaining the long‐term viability of quality circles.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

M.J. Isaac

The objective here is to critically assess the essential characteristics of quality circles and to focus attention on the factors and conditions which are crucial to the…

Abstract

The objective here is to critically assess the essential characteristics of quality circles and to focus attention on the factors and conditions which are crucial to the successful implementation of quality circles at Cosalt Holiday Homes. The proposed quality circle programme for Cosalt is discussed and methods of implementation, together with progress to date and recommendations for the future are given. Amongst the main findings is a view that there is a need for a clear commitment from top management, together with a proper organisational climate and favourable shopfloor attitudes for successful implementation of a quality circle programme.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Joachim Deppe

With the foundation of the National Quality Circle Society in the Federal Republic of Germany, a forum has been established for small group work and the promotion of…

Abstract

With the foundation of the National Quality Circle Society in the Federal Republic of Germany, a forum has been established for small group work and the promotion of Quality Circle ideas. The number of firms in the FRG who use Quality Circles is growing and a historical account is provided. Examples of Quality Circle work in German firms is given.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

H.N. Seelye and J.A. Sween

Based on a survey of 136 successful Japanese quality control circles (QC Circles), six underlying QC circle dimensions are identified through factor analysis. The surveyed…

Abstract

Based on a survey of 136 successful Japanese quality control circles (QC Circles), six underlying QC circle dimensions are identified through factor analysis. The surveyed industries were categorised into four types: automotive/steel; other manufacturing; construction; retail/service. All circle dimensions except one (techniques of data collection and analysis used by the circles) differ significantly across industry type. This finding suggests that quality circles planning, implementation, and evaluation may encounter industry‐specific characteristics that need to be taken into account.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

J. Lees and B.G. Dale

A postal questionnaire survey of quality circles in the UK service sector has been completed. It was revealed that there are no major differences in the characteristics of…

Abstract

A postal questionnaire survey of quality circles in the UK service sector has been completed. It was revealed that there are no major differences in the characteristics of circle programmes in the service and manufacturing organisations. However, service industries need to be aware of the individuality of each organisation before adoption of programmes.

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Management Research News, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1980

Elaine Rendall and Marjorie Maser

Intrigued by brief references to Quality Circles in various articles in Personnel and Training publications, we began a search for more definitive information on the…

Abstract

Intrigued by brief references to Quality Circles in various articles in Personnel and Training publications, we began a search for more definitive information on the structure, use and value of Quality Circles in the US. We found numerous articles in journals and periodicals describing implementation in the US of this Japanese concept. The articles described successes and often referred to consulting firms as further resources. Literature was obtained from consulting firms specializing in the implementation of Quality Circles plus data and impressions from companies that have instituted Quality Circles. One consulting firm mentioned application to health care facilities, but we were unable to locate a hospital which has implemented the process.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

B.G. Dale

Quality circles are organisational interventions that seek to increase an organisation's productivity and the quality of its products through direct employee…

Abstract

Quality circles are organisational interventions that seek to increase an organisation's productivity and the quality of its products through direct employee participation. The underlying assumption is that such participation will result in useful suggestions for improving work methods and quality, and for increasing employee commitment to implement these changes. Quality circles typically are small groups of volunteers from the same area who meet regularly, under the leadership of their supervisor, to identify, analyse and solve quality and related problems in their respective areas of responsibility.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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