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Article

Paula Danskin, Basil G. Englis, Michael R. Solomon, Marla Goldsmith and Jennifer Davey

The purpose of this research is to investigate knowledge management in the textile industry specifically through the relationships and interconnections of knowledge

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate knowledge management in the textile industry specifically through the relationships and interconnections of knowledge management systems, strategy and firm performance across the value chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This research examines the process of acquisition, retention, maintenance, and retrieval of knowledge both within the firm through organizational memory and across the value chain. A series of case studies examines how Invista (a Du Pont subsidiary) manages knowledge internally and externally through relationships with downstream partners across a single value‐chain within the textile industry. Qualitative interviews assess the “state of the industry” regarding knowledge management systems.

Findings

Differentiation through knowledge is difficult in practice. Invista has taken the first steps to develop knowledge management systems that connect the internal and external knowledge base to gain competitive advantage. Establishing internal knowledge management systems for organizational memory creates opportunities to minimize knowledge isolation in functional departments and creates a greater base for tacit learning to be leveraged. External knowledge management systems bring value chain members closer together and add value to the product (i.e. increased quality, customer perceptions of brand platforms) throughout the value chain. Active external knowledge systems create opportunities to reap the full benefits of internal knowledge and knowledge from other firms within the network.

Originality/value

This paper describes the process of acquisition, retention, maintenance, and retrieval of knowledge within the firm by improving organizational memory and across the value chain through knowledge management systems to gain competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article

Pooja Rani

This paper aims to analyze the customer-based brand equity index (CBBE-I) of Tourism Brand Kurukshetra.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the customer-based brand equity index (CBBE-I) of Tourism Brand Kurukshetra.

Design/methodology/approach

For the purpose of this study, the author uses primary and secondary data on destination attractiveness of Tourism Brand Kurukshetra for a sample of 150 tourists including domestic and international. The study used structural equation modeling and factor weighting methods.

Findings

The research presents an investigation into the destination attractiveness index of Tourism Brand Kurukshetra in an emerging market, i.e. Kurukshetra. Tourism Brand Kurukshetra from the brand equity perspective is an attractive destination.

Practical implications

It suggests that the CBBE index of Kurukshetra ought to analyze a longitudinal study to get the proper image of Kurukshetra from a touristic perspective. It provides long-term attractiveness to enhance tourism.

Originality/value

This is the first brand equity study contributed to branding literature of Tourism Brand Kurukshetra. The index is an accomplished way to present the tourism condition of any destination.

Details

Journal of Tourism Analysis: Revista de Análisis Turístico, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2254-0644

Keywords

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Article

Hsien-Cheng Lin, Xiao Han, Tu Lyu, Wen-Hsien Ho, Yunbao Xu, Tien-Chih Hsieh, Lihua Zhu and Liang Zhang

Research in tourism and hospitality industry marketing has identified many highly effective applications of social media. However, studies in the existing literature do…

Abstract

Purpose

Research in tourism and hospitality industry marketing has identified many highly effective applications of social media. However, studies in the existing literature do not enable a comprehensive understanding of this phenomenon because they lack a theoretical foundation. Therefore, this study systematically reviewed the literature from the perspective of the task-technology fit (TTF) theory. The purpose of this paper is to map out what is known about social media use in tourism and hospitality marketing and what areas need further exploration.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive cumulative review of the literature obtained 99 articles published in tourism and hospitality journals from 2010 to 2019.

Findings

The analysis suggests that to understand social media use in tourism marketing, researchers and practitioners in the industry must clarify the following four issues: the control variables, longitudinal analyzes and TTF concepts that should be used in future studies; the fitness of social media platforms for tourism marketing; how various social media platforms differ in terms of performance outcome; and the digital divide in the use of social media for tourism.

Originality/value

An integrated framework was developed to identify constructs and to understand their relationships. Recent studies in this domain are discussed; theoretical and practical suggestions and implications for future research are given.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Book part

Belverd E. Needles, Marian Powers and Mark L. Frigo

This study examines the links between financial performance and executive compensation for high-performance companies (HPC). HPC display sustained and superior cash flow…

Abstract

This study examines the links between financial performance and executive compensation for high-performance companies (HPC). HPC display sustained and superior cash flow returns, asset growth, and total shareholder returns. In previous empirical analysis, HPC companies displayed specific identifiable financial performance drivers and measures when compared to companies in the S&P 500 (Needles et al., 2004). Most recently, HPC sustained their high performance when compared to the S&P 500 over varied economic periods. Further, the research identified operating asset management characteristics of these companies, especially as they relate to the cash cycle (Needles et al., 2004). Continuing this stream of research, this study first identifies the financial and non-financial performance measures related to compensation of top management of HPC as reported in the companies’ public disclosures. Then, these findings for HPC are matched to a set of comparable non-HPC. Finally, we evaluate the stated performance measures for executive compensation in light of the performance drivers and measures identified by previous research to be distinguishing characteristics of HPC. We hypothesize that HPC will more closely align stated performance measures for executive compensation with performance characteristics that have been shown to be characteristics of HPC. We find that HPC are more focused and unambiguous in their use of both financial and non-financial performance measures in executive compensation.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Measuring and Rewarding Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-571-0

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Article

Samuel Tweneboah-Kodua, Francis Atsu and William Buchanan

The study uses cyberattacks announcements on 96 firms that are listed on S&P 500 over the period from January 03, 2013, to December 29, 2017.

Abstract

Purpose

The study uses cyberattacks announcements on 96 firms that are listed on S&P 500 over the period from January 03, 2013, to December 29, 2017.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis was performed in two ways: cross-section and industry level. The authors use statistical tests that account for the effects of cross-section correlation in returns, returns series correlation, volatility changes and skewness in the returns.

Findings

These imply that studying the cumulative effects of cyberattacks on prices of listed firms without grouping them into the various sectors may be non-informative; financial sector firms tend to react cumulatively to cyberattacks over a three-day period than other sectors; and technology firms tend to be less reactive to the announcement of a data breach. Such firms may possibly have the necessary tools and techniques to address large-scale cyberattacks.

Research limitations/implications

For cross-section analysis, the outcome shows that the market does not significantly react to cyberattacks for all the event windows, except [−30, 30], while for the sector-level analysis, the analysis offers two main results.

Practical implications

First, while there is a firm reaction to cyberattacks for long event window for retail sector, there is no evidence of a cumulative firm reaction to cyberattacks for both short and long event windows for the industrial, information technology and health sectors. Second, the firms in the financial sector, there is a strong evidence of cumulative reaction to cyberattacks for [−1, 1] for the financial industry, and the reactions disappear for relatively longer event windows.

Social implications

These imply that studying the cumulative effects of cyberattacks on prices of listed firms without grouping them into the various sectors may be non-informative, the financial sector firms tend to react cumulatively to cyberattacks over a three-day period than other sectors, technology firms tend to be less reactive to the announcement of a data breach, possibly such firms may have the necessary tools and techniques to address large-scale cyberattacks.

Originality/value

The work provides new insights into the effect of cyber security on stock prices.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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