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Article

Cigdem Gonul Kochan and David R. Nowicki

The study of supply chain resilience (SCRES) continues to gain interest in the academic and practitioner communities. The purpose of this paper is to present a focused…

Abstract

Purpose

The study of supply chain resilience (SCRES) continues to gain interest in the academic and practitioner communities. The purpose of this paper is to present a focused review of the SCRES literature by investigating supply chain (SC) capabilities, their relationship to SCRES outcomes and the underpinning theoretical mechanisms of this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the systematic literature review approach to examine 383 articles published between 2000 and 2017, ultimately down selecting to the most relevant 228 peer-reviewed studies. Context-interventions-mechanisms-outcomes (CIMO) logic is applied to organize and synthesize these peer-reviewed studies. A typological framework is developed from the CIMO-based classification of the SCRES literature.

Findings

The findings of this study outline the gaps in the SCRES literature and present an agenda for future research.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents an exploratory research; therefore, the typological model presented is just one of the possible perspectives.

Practical implications

The typology of SCRES literature can help practitioners to understand SCRES and to measure and assess the resilience of SCs.

Originality/value

The paper provides clear definitions of SCRES constructs, develops a typological framework to further understand SCRES and identifies SCRES measures and assessment techniques.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article

Cigdem Gonul Kochan, Saba Pourreza, Huguette Tran and Victor R. Prybutok

The rapid consumption of new electronic devices has expanded the volume of electronic waste (e-waste) and created a potential threat to the environment. Recycling of…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid consumption of new electronic devices has expanded the volume of electronic waste (e-waste) and created a potential threat to the environment. Recycling of e-waste (eCycling) can help stem the proliferation of e-waste and its environmental threat. In order to increase this positive involvement in eCycling and design effective eCycling programs, a better understanding of eCycling behaviors is needed. The purpose of this paper is to employ the Theory of Reasoned Action as a framework to develop a model to identify the determinants of eCycling behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the model, a survey of 327 university students is undertaken. To analyze the eCycling behavior from the survey data, a structural equation modeling technique is used.

Findings

The findings suggest that: attitudes and moral norms positively influence eCycling behavior; the higher the awareness of consequences, the more the eCycling involvement; and perceived convenience is an important factor that leads to more involvement in eCycling.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited by the student sample and campus environment that might confine the generalizability of the study. Also, additional variables need to be examined in order to better explain eCycling behavior. The result of the study provides insights for organizations to build successful eCycling programs, engage young adults such as college students in eCycling, and increase involvement in eCycling.

Practical implications

This study provides insights that can help supply chain managers to better understand the consumer involvement in eCycling. Managers’ understanding of eCycling behavior would encourage eCycling involvement by placing drop-off units in convenient locations and by creating campaigns that motivate consumers to return their e-waste. An increased consumer involvement in eCycling can help manufacturing companies lower the cost of e-waste across the supply chain and regain the value of returned materials by adopting reverse logistics.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the stream of eCycling literature by investigating students’ eCycling intentions and behaviors on a university campus. The paper develops an understanding of how eCycling involvement might be improved.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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