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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Jill Hanson and Ciaran Burke

The study aimed to explore the effect of second year business students engaging in counterfactual reasoning on their unrealistic optimism regarding attainment on an…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to explore the effect of second year business students engaging in counterfactual reasoning on their unrealistic optimism regarding attainment on an employability module.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an experimental design, the study compared the module performance of those who generated reasons why they would and would not achieve a series of specific grades. A control group who did not generate any reasons also took part.

Findings

Students who generated reasons why they would not achieve a good grade were less likely to be unrealistically optimistic and more likely to attain a good grade on their assessment.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small sample of students from one form of programme, so replication with a greater sample drawn from other programmes would increase reliability.

Practical implications

The results suggest an easily applied and practical way of engaging students in employability modules to support their development of a range of capitals.

Social implications

The findings are considered in relation to the theory of possible selves, the value for students, particularly widening participation of students, of improved engagement with employability modules and the possibility of applying this technique in wider educational settings.

Originality/value

This paper extends Hoch’s (1985) original study by considering the use of counterfactual reasoning for assessment performance and offering a an easy-to-apply tool for module leaders to support student attainment in employability development modules.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Samuel Dent

Abstract

Details

Recognising Students who Care for Children while Studying
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-672-6

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2022

Abstract

Details

Theory of Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-787-9

Abstract

Details

Theory of Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-787-9

Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2021

Vanessa Dodd and Ciaran Burke

This chapter explores the development of an individual-level measure of decent work. It draws on a recent article written by the authors, which was part of a larger…

Abstract

This chapter explores the development of an individual-level measure of decent work. It draws on a recent article written by the authors, which was part of a larger international project to validate a cross-cultural self-report measure of decent work within the context of the Psychology of Working Theory (Dodd et al., 2019). It discusses the importance of a psychological perspective on decent work to better understand working lives; summarizes the findings from the validation studies Decent Work Scale (DWS) in eight countries; outlines potential uses of the DWS; and considers the limitations of the DWS as well as challenges to conceptualizing decent work more generally.

Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Ciaran Burke

Abstract

Details

Recognising Students who Care for Children while Studying
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-672-6

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2022

Abstract

Details

Theory of Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-787-9

1 – 10 of 34