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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2020

Chun-Yu Lin and Chung-Kai Huang

In the face of a changing and turbulent environment, an organizational learning culture (OLC) is crucial for the long-term operation of an organization. A learning culture…

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Abstract

Purpose

In the face of a changing and turbulent environment, an organizational learning culture (OLC) is crucial for the long-term operation of an organization. A learning culture provides the capacity to effectively integrate employees, and it also provides structure so that an organization can move forward via continuous learning and change. Few empirical results are available from Chinese companies enduring an organizational change. To bridge this research gap, this study investigated the relationships among an OLC, job satisfaction, turnover intentions and job performance during organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach with structural equation modeling (SEM) and bootstrapping estimation was used to test hypotheses developed from a sample of 434 employees in a restructured telecommunications company in Taiwan.

Findings

Employees who experienced a higher learning culture had lower levels of turnover intentions and exhibited better job performance. Job satisfaction had a negative impact on employee turnover intentions but a positive impact on job performance. Moreover, job satisfaction fully mediated the relationships between an OLC and employee turnover intentions and job performance. When encountering organizational planned changes, a vibrant learning culture gave employees a higher level of satisfaction in their jobs and workplace. Although unexpected challenges often appeared during the organizational changes, employees with a higher level of job satisfaction tended to fulfill their own job duties and showed fewer turnover intentions.

Originality/value

In investigating issues related to organizational change, this study provides managerial insights and addresses strategies for facilitating the adoption of an OLC into the design and implementation of a better workplace environment.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Chung‐Kai Li and Chia‐Hung Hung

This study aims to examine the relations between teachers' perception of parental involvement and teacher satisfaction. It further aims to investigate how this…

1811

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relations between teachers' perception of parental involvement and teacher satisfaction. It further aims to investigate how this relationship may be moderated by interpersonal personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was conducted; participants were 572 classroom teachers who teach at public elementary schools in Taiwan.

Findings

Hierarchical regression results indicated that parental involvement at home was considered the most effective factor influencing teachers' satisfaction, followed by teacher‐parent contact. Parental involvement at school was less important. Furthermore, extraversion moderates the relationship partially; teachers low in extraversion perceived home‐based involvement associated with teachers' satisfaction more strongly than those high in extraversion. In contrast, the study found no moderating effect for agreeable teachers.

Originality/value

This article presents an original empirical study that expands the model of parental involvement in order to improve understanding of how teacher's perception of parent involvement is linked to teacher satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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