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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

John Hayes, Christopher W. Allinson and Steven J. Armstrong

Gender‐centred perspectives of women managers and women in general characterise them as being more intuitive than male managers and men in general. Evidence for gender…

Abstract

Gender‐centred perspectives of women managers and women in general characterise them as being more intuitive than male managers and men in general. Evidence for gender differences in cognitive style was sought by administering the Cognitive Style Index, a measure of intuition analysis, to three UK samples of managers and three UK samples of non‐managers. Results indicate that there is no difference between female and male managers in terms of intuitive orientation, that female non‐managers are more analytical (less intuitive) than male non‐managers and more analytical than female managers. This lack of support for stereotypic characterisation of women managers and women in general as being more intuitive than their male equivalents is discussed within the context of structural and gendered cultural perspectives on behaviour in organisations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

John Hayes, Alison Rose‐Quirie and Christopher W. Allinson

This study investigates whether there is a set of universal senior management competencies in the context of one large multi‐site service organisation. Four distinct work…

Abstract

This study investigates whether there is a set of universal senior management competencies in the context of one large multi‐site service organisation. Four distinct work environments are identified and different lists of competencies are perceived to be important by managers working at the same grade (unit general manager or equivalent) in each of these environments. These findings are considered within the context of the debate about the utility of competency lists for management development.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Anna Sutton, Helen M Williams and Christopher W Allinson

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether self-awareness, which is associated with general well-being and positive life outcomes, is also of specific benefit in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether self-awareness, which is associated with general well-being and positive life outcomes, is also of specific benefit in the workplace. The authors tested the relationship between self-awareness and job-related well-being, and evaluated two different interventions designed to improve dispositional self-awareness at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Full-time employees took part in these training interventions and completed questionnaires using a switching-replications design. Questionnaires measured dispositional self-attentiveness (reflection and rumination) and job well-being (satisfaction, enthusiasm and contentment) at three time points over a period of six weeks. Statistical analyses were complemented with qualitative analysis of reported impacts.

Findings

Self-awareness was positively associated with job-related well-being and was improved by training. Employees reported gaining a greater appreciation of diversity, improved communication with colleagues and increased confidence.

Research limitations/implications

Sample size limited the extent to which the relatively weak relationships between the concepts could be identified.

Practical implications

Self-awareness is demonstrated to be of value at work, associated with higher well-being and improvements in several positive occupational outcomes. The self-awareness training is more likely to result in active work-based improvements than in reflective changes.

Originality/value

Dispositional self-awareness is shown to be subject to change through training. The study demonstrates the value of self-awareness at work and identifies a range of related work outcomes.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Rachid Zeffane

In the past decade or so, workplace organisation and restructuring processes, have been subjected to the most intense scrutiny. Driven by rapidly intensifying competitive…

Abstract

In the past decade or so, workplace organisation and restructuring processes, have been subjected to the most intense scrutiny. Driven by rapidly intensifying competitive pressures, work organisations sought increased flexibility, especially from labour, as they struggled to maintain market shares in an economic environment increasingly characterised by excess in labour supply. Pressures for change were probably most evident in the public sector where economic and ideological forces combined to limit the growth of government services and increase their exposure to competitive forces.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 13 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1948

THE Library Association Record will, no doubt, produce the appropriate account of the initiation of Mr. Charles Nowell, at Manchester, as President of the Library…

Abstract

THE Library Association Record will, no doubt, produce the appropriate account of the initiation of Mr. Charles Nowell, at Manchester, as President of the Library Association. Only a few words are necessary here to assure the new president of our satisfaftion with the recipient of our highest honour and our assurance of our loyalty. He has had the full apprenticeship from his youth up in the ways of public librarianship and the great work he has done since he has been Chief Librarian of Manchester has had the approval both of the citizens there and, we venture to assert, of the nation. It was specially appropriate that the ceremony, as was the case with Mr. Cashmore at Birmingham, should take place in his own city where the citizens, his Lord Mayor—who entertained the guests splendidly—his Committee and fellow City Officers could share in our tribute. It was even more fitting that that city should be the cradle of librarianship, having our pioneer of pioneers, Edward Edwards, as its first Librarian, and having also had a succession of fine library committees served by a series of quite eminent librarians. One word more; the speeches were worthy of the occasion and Mr. Gordon transferred his own powers to Mr. Nowell with the grace and eloquence he has shown consistently. Our readers will have seen the capital portrait—a speaking likeness—of Mr. Nowell in the January Record.

Details

New Library World, vol. 50 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Marty Mattare

Entrepreneurship education is rapidly growing, both in the number of schools offering programs and in the range of courses. But, survey data shows that entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship education is rapidly growing, both in the number of schools offering programs and in the range of courses. But, survey data shows that entrepreneurship education is more likely to focus on how to evaluate business opportunities, write a business plan, present a proposal to investors, and conduct analytical exercises to determine value. The success of a venture begins with the entrepreneur, and as students become entrepreneurs, they will need to wear a variety of “hats” and serve as the primary finance, marketing, human resources, and operations person. High self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and well-developed interpersonal skills have been shown to equate to a firmʼs success.These skills are rarely polished and perfected in the classroom. But, because they are so critical, more concentration on their development is needed in the entrepreneurship curriculum. This article presents the case and provides a model for developing “Use of Self” skills in the entrepreneurship classroom.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Christopher C.A. Chan, Lynn Lim and Siew Kuan Keasberry

Despite a plethora of studies purporting that learning could occur at the individual, team and organizational levels, there is still a lack of reported empirical evidence…

Abstract

Despite a plethora of studies purporting that learning could occur at the individual, team and organizational levels, there is still a lack of reported empirical evidence on these linkages. Accordingly, these theoretical assumptions will be tested with empirical evidences in this study. Interestingly and contrary to the literature, individual learning was not significantly related to organizational learning. Internal team learning (learning within teams) was partially related to organizational learning, and external team learning (cross‐functional team learning) was significantly related to organizational learning. Organizational learning was conceptualized and tested as a three‐factor variable that consists of commitment to learning, shared vision, and open‐mindedness. A discussion of the results is provided.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Jeannette Oppedisano and Kenneth Laird

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a…

Abstract

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a major component of a multidisciplinary entrepreneurship course. The purpose of the course is to attract students who may not be familiar with the entrepreneurship concept itself, the role of women in such economic ventures, or the possibilities for people like themselves in such a career avenue. Students are exposed to the accomplishments of women entrepreneurs throughout U.S. history in the broad categories of agriculture and mining; construction; communication; manufacturing; service (both for profit and not-for-profit); transportation; and wholesale and retail trade. This content experience is then enhanced by the studentsʼ own direct interaction with and interviewing of women entrepreneurs. The implementation, potential outcomes, and possible adaptations of the course are described, and this transformational learning process model is illustrated.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1939

The Twentieth Annual Report of the Chief Medical Officer of the Ministry of Health, Sir Arthur MacNalty, for the year 1938, begins with a review of the nature of progress…

Abstract

The Twentieth Annual Report of the Chief Medical Officer of the Ministry of Health, Sir Arthur MacNalty, for the year 1938, begins with a review of the nature of progress and the application of the conception to questions of health. Life in primitive society is not so healthy as is sometimes supposed, and the true condition is cloaked by the law of survival of the fittest. Civilisation has its cost; certain diseases follow in its train, e.g., tuberculosis. Besides the “new humanity” of the eighteenth century improvements in public health began to appear, and the population increased rapidly. Then came the progress of the Industrial Revolution, accompanied by new problems, especially in the domain of health. It can be concluded, however, that the growth of the health services, and the proof of their effectiveness as shown by the improvement of the nation's vital statistics, is real evidence of progress. In 1938 there was a rise of 10,647 births over the number registered in 1937, representing a birth rate of 15·1 per 1,000 living—a slight improvement on the rate of 14·9 for 1937. It is 0·7 above the rate for 1933, which was the lowest recorded. The infant mortality rate is 53 per 1,000 births as against 58 for 1937, and is now the lowest on record. The deaths in 1938 were 478,829, as compared with 509,574 in 1937, a decrease of 30,745. The five principal killing diseases remain the same as for many years past and occur in the same order, viz.:— (1) Diseases of the heart and circulatory system; (2) cancer—malignant disease; (3) bronchitis, pneumonia and other respiratory diseases; (4) diseases of the nervous system; (5) all forms of tuberculosis. If, however, the diseases are re‐arranged to show the principal killing diseases operating during the years of working life—15–65—then tuberculosis takes the third place instead of the fifth, and diseases of the nervous system occupy the fifth place.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 41 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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