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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Christopher Stoney

Explores British Telecommunication plc’s (BT) partnership with the Communication Workers Union (CWU) and examines its significance for the development of a degree level…

Abstract

Explores British Telecommunication plc’s (BT) partnership with the Communication Workers Union (CWU) and examines its significance for the development of a degree level programme of workplace learning. The BSc in Computer Science is now being delivered part‐time to 500 BT employees, none of whom have previous experience of post‐secondary education. In particular, the role of the union in establishing the course is examined, along with the programme’s philosophy and aims, its content, funding and efficacy. The case study incorporates semi‐structured interviews with BT managers, CWU representatives, academics responsible for designing and delivering the course and a round‐table discussion with BT employees currently taking the degree course. By pulling these views and experiences together the paper is able to assess this programme of formal workplace learning and identify issues, strengths and weaknesses that should be of interest to those politicians, managers, HR professionals and union representatives currently interested in the future of workplace learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Christopher Stoney

Focuses on the introduction of strategic management into a UK local authority, based on several years of empirical research. Aims primarily to explore conceptual and…

Abstract

Focuses on the introduction of strategic management into a UK local authority, based on several years of empirical research. Aims primarily to explore conceptual and practical links between strategic management and scientific management. Demonstrates that clear parallels exist between the two models and thereby lends support to those who argue that scientific management remains an important influence on modern management thinking and practice. However, despite their shared origins, strategic management has developed into a more sophisticated and potentially more powerful management tool. In particular, through the distinction drawn between strategic and operational decision making it appears to extend the principle of separating conception from execution into the heart of senior management. A realistic account of the political process of change within the local authority is also provided and subsequent performance following the introduction of strategic management is assessed.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

A telecommunications company, trade union and university are involved in one of the most ambitious examples of workplace learning undertaken in Britain. BT plc, a company…

Abstract

A telecommunications company, trade union and university are involved in one of the most ambitious examples of workplace learning undertaken in Britain. BT plc, a company considered to be at the forefront of partnership working, has teamed up with the Communication Workers’ Union (CWU), Britain’s largest communications union, and London University’s Queen Mary and Westfield College in a BSc in computer science that will help up to 500 BT employees at a time, when fully operational.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Lorraine Dacre Pool, Pamela Qualter and Peter J. Sewell

There has been little empirical research conducted in relation to graduate employability and diagnostic tools available in this area are very limited. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been little empirical research conducted in relation to graduate employability and diagnostic tools available in this area are very limited. The purpose of this paper is to introduce and explore the factor structure of a new measure of employability development, the CareerEDGE Employability Development Profile (EDP).

Design/methodology/approach

The EDP was completed by 807 undergraduate students, providing data for exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses.

Findings

The analyses suggest that the EDP is multidimensional and maps clearly onto the CareerEDGE model of graduate employability.

Research limitations/implications

These findings are discussed and interpreted as offering support for the use of the EDP with students as a developmental tool and as a measurement tool for use in the design, implementation and evaluation of employability interventions or other research purposes.

Originality/value

The provision of a practical employability development tool that is suitable for use with students of any Higher Education institution. The findings also add to the limited literature on graduate employability.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

Natural selection—survival of the fittest—is as old as life itself. Applied genetics which is purposeful in contrast to natural selection also has a long history…

Abstract

Natural selection—survival of the fittest—is as old as life itself. Applied genetics which is purposeful in contrast to natural selection also has a long history, particularly in agriculture; it has received impetus from the more exacting demands of the food industry for animal breeds with higher lean : fat and meat : bone ratios, for crops resistant to the teeming world of parasites. Capturing the exquisite scent, the colours and form beautiful of a rose is in effect applied genetics and it has even been applied to man. For example, Frederick the Great, Emperor of Prussia, to maintain a supply of very tall men for his guards—his Prussian Guards averaged seven feet in height—ordered them to marry very tall women to produce offspring carrying the genes of great height. In recent times, however, research and experiment in genetic control, more in the nature of active interference with genetic composition, has developed sufficiently to begin yielding results. It is self‐evident that in the field of micro‐organisms, active interference or manipulations will produce greater knowledge and understanding of the gene actions than in any other field or by any other techniques. The phenomenon of “transferred drug resistance”, the multi‐factorial resistance, of a chemical nature, transferred from one species of micro‐organisms to another, from animal to human pathogens, its role in mainly intestinal pathology and the serious hazards which have arisen from it; all this has led to an intensive study of plasmids and their mode of transmission. The work of the Agricultural Research Council's biologists (reported elsewhere in this issue) in relation to nitrogen‐fixing genes and transfer from one organism able to fix nitrogen to another not previously having this ability, illustrates the extreme importance of this new field. Disease susceptibility, the inhibition of invasiveness which can be acquired by relatively “silent” micro‐organisms, a better understanding of virulence and the possible “disarming” of organisms, particularly those of particular virulence to vulnerable groups. Perhaps this is looking for too much too soon, but Escherichia coli would seem to offer more scope for genetic experiments than most; it has serotypes of much variability and viability; and its life and labours in the human intestine have assumed considerable importance in recent years. The virulence of a few of its serotypes constitute an important field in food epidemiology. Their capacity to transfer plasmids—anent transfer of drug resistance— to strains of other organisms resident in the intestines, emphasizes the need for close study, with safeguards.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 77 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

“Streets broad and narrow”. In terms of shops and retail trade, it was always the narrow streets of town centres which attracted the trade, although the shops were small…

Abstract

“Streets broad and narrow”. In terms of shops and retail trade, it was always the narrow streets of town centres which attracted the trade, although the shops were small cramped for space, but always a cosy, friendly air. Few ever became vacant and although interspersing chain shops seemed to break the rhythm, most were privately owned, run through the years by generations of the same family. The shops removed the proverbial meanness of narrow streets; the lights, the shopping crowds, especially on Saturday nights; shop frontmen bawling their prices, the new boys calling the late editions—all this made shopping an attractive outing; it still does. There were the practical advantages of being able to cross and re‐cross the street, with many shops on both sides within the field of vision. The broad highway had none of these things and it was extremely rare for shops to exist both sides of the street, and still less to flourish. It is much the same to this day. Hygiene purists would find much to fault, but it was what the public wanted and curiously, there was very little food poisoning; it would be untrue to say outbreaks never occurred but they were extremely rare.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 83 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1980

Reviewing the Food Standards Report on Misdescriptions contained in this issue—the terms, names, phrases widespread in the field of agriculture and food—one cannot fail to…

Abstract

Reviewing the Food Standards Report on Misdescriptions contained in this issue—the terms, names, phrases widespread in the field of agriculture and food—one cannot fail to notice the impressive role that words generally play in everyday use of language, especially in those areas where widespread common usage imports regional differences. The modern tendency is to give to words new meanings and nowhere is this so apparent as in the food industry; the Food Standards Committee considered a number of these. The FSC see the pictorial device as making a deeper impression than mere words in relation to consumer preference, which is undoubtedly true. Even Memory can be compartmentalized and especially with the increasing years, the memory tends to become photographic, retaining visual impressions more strongly than the written word. Auditory impressions depend largely on their accompaniments; if words are spoken with the showing of a picture or sung to a catchy tune, these will be more strongly retained than mere words on a printed label. At best, pictorial devices give rise to transient impressions, depending on the needs and interests of the viewer. Many look but do not see, and as for spoken words, these may “go in one ear and out of the other!”.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 82 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1972

Food—national dietary standards—is a sensitive index of socio‐economic conditions generally; there are others, reflecting different aspects, but none more sensitive. A…

Abstract

Food—national dietary standards—is a sensitive index of socio‐economic conditions generally; there are others, reflecting different aspects, but none more sensitive. A country that eats well has healthy, robust people; the housewife who cooks hearty, nourishing meals has a lusty, virile family. It is not surprising, therefore, that all governments of the world have a food policy, ranking high in its priorities and are usually prepared to sacrifice other national policies to preserve it. Before the last war, when food was much less of an instrument of government policy than now—there were not the shortages or the price vagaries—in France, any government, whatever its colour, which could not keep down the price of food so that the poor man ate his fill, never survived long; it was—to make use of the call sign of those untidy, shambling columns from our streets which seem to monopolize the television news screens—“out!” Lovers of the Old France would say that the country had been without stable government since 1870, but the explanation for the many changes in power in France in those pre‐war days could be expressed in one word—food!

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 74 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1952

Various newspapers seem to agree that the Ministry of Food will cease to exist in the course of 1953. The increase, this month, in the price to the consumer of several…

Abstract

Various newspapers seem to agree that the Ministry of Food will cease to exist in the course of 1953. The increase, this month, in the price to the consumer of several rationed foods, as the result of reductions in subsidies, may facilitate the abolition of rationing at an early date—and this abolition, it is considered, will attract housewives' votes to the Conservative party, in addition to securing economies in administrative costs. If Mr. Churchill and Lord Woolton remain in office and decide to abolish the Ministry of Food, what remains to be considered is the extent to which its functions will remain and to what Department they will be allotted. For the abolition of all controls is just unthinkable and would involve economic chaos. It may be that some local authorities would welcome complete independence of central supervision in the administration of Food Laws. On the other hand, they would strongly deplore the cessation of the flow of those Statutory Instruments by which standards of composition and quality are set up. Nor would all manufacturers wish to see any backsliding in the matter of the control of advertisements and labels. In a recent issue of The Pharmaceutical Journal, an unnamed manufacturer expressed the view that it would be a pity if the good results achieved by the onlightened action of the Labelling Division of the Ministry of Food were allowed to slip away, and deplored the discontinuance of the Ministry's advisory service. For myself, I have no doubt that there must also remain great need and scope for centralised activities in the matter of limiting certain imports, restricting the sale of luxury articles in short supply (for example, cream, at certain periods of the year, at least) and various other controls required for economic reasons. It would be a pity to throw away the baby with the bath‐water.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 54 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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