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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Christopher Shaffer and Olga Casey

The purpose of this paper is to expose librarians, scholars and other interested parties to the numerous films available concerning the 1989 and 1991 European revolutions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expose librarians, scholars and other interested parties to the numerous films available concerning the 1989 and 1991 European revolutions. The films that are discussed can potentially be used as ancillary sources that will lead to a more in-depth understanding of these topics.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a literature review examining films relating to the 1989 and 1991 revolutions in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. The findings are presented in the form of an annotated bibliography.

Findings

A total of 24 films from eight countries are presented in this annotated bibliography.

Originality/value

In researching this paper, the authors have been unable to find any similar works, which makes this work of particular value to those wanting to learn more about this period of change in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Christopher Shaffer

This paper aims to discusses the importance of Native American literature in library collections.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discusses the importance of Native American literature in library collections.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on research of recent articles.

Findings

The paper identifies many good titles on Native Americans that deserve to be in libraries so that the history and culture of Native Americans will be available to all users.

Practical implications

Libraries should identify good quality books on Native Americans and by Native Americans to add to their collections. Many are now available so that it is not difficult to find appropriate ones that reflect contemporary views of Native Americans.

Originality/value

This paper pulls together a good deal of recent information on books by and about Native Americans as well as pointing to some excellent collections.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Christopher Shaffer and Olga Casey

The purpose of this study is to examine the portrayals of librarians in world cinema. In so doing, librarian stereotypes within film may be examined, but also those…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the portrayals of librarians in world cinema. In so doing, librarian stereotypes within film may be examined, but also those wishing to develop a collection of films featuring librarians and libraries will have a resource to which they may refer.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors approached this study as an annotated bibliography of the films studied. A synopsis of each film is provided as well as analysis of libraries and librarian roles within the context of each film.

Findings

Films from around the world tend to have many similar stereotypes concerning librarians. Whether those stereotypes are necessarily good or bad may lie in the eye of the beholder.

Originality/value

Although there have been numerous articles written on librarian stereotypes and librarians within literature, there has been relatively little written about librarians within the context of cinema.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Kathleen E. Voges, Richard L. Priem, Christopher Shook and Margaret Shaffer

Perceived environmental uncertainty (PEU) is a foundational concept in organization studies. The PEU typologies used in organizational research were developed using…

Abstract

Perceived environmental uncertainty (PEU) is a foundational concept in organization studies. The PEU typologies used in organizational research were developed using private sector managers. But, do public sector managers perceive the same uncertainty sources? We asked public sector managers in Hong Kong to identify and group uncertainty sources facing their organizations. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis yielded classes of uncertainty sources that differ from those developed using private sector managers.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2004

A.Allan Schmid

The first Wisconsin Ph.D.s who came to MSU with an institutional bent were agricultural economists and included Henry Larzalere (Ph.D. 1938) whose major professor was…

Abstract

The first Wisconsin Ph.D.s who came to MSU with an institutional bent were agricultural economists and included Henry Larzalere (Ph.D. 1938) whose major professor was Asher Hobson. Larzalere recalls the influence of Commons who retired in 1933. Upon graduation, Larzalere worked a short time for Wisconsin Governor Phillip Fox LaFollette who won passage of the nation’s first unemployment compensation act. Commons had earlier helped LaFollette’s father, Robert, to a number of institutional innovations.4 Larzalere continued the Commons’ tradition of contributing to the development of new institutions rather than being content to provide an efficiency apologia for existing private governance structures. He helped Michigan farmers form cooperatives. He taught land economics prior to Barlowe’s arrival in 1948, but primarily taught agricultural marketing. One of his Master’s degree students was Glenn Johnson (see below). Larzalere retired in 1977.

Details

Wisconsin "Government and Business" and the History of Heterodox Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-090-6

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Christopher Richardson, Guat-Hoon Tan and Shaian Kiumarsi

This paper aims to investigate and reflect upon the effects of personality traits on expatriate adjustment within the context of Malaysia’s multicultural society.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate and reflect upon the effects of personality traits on expatriate adjustment within the context of Malaysia’s multicultural society.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the multicultural personality questionnaire (MPQ) and extrapolating from the literature on expatriate adjustment, the authors introduce five hypotheses, which are then tested based on data derived from 101 expatriates working in Malaysia.

Findings

The results indicate a positive relationship between both open-mindedness and adjustment as well as between flexibility and adjustment. However, the authors did not observe any significant positive relationship between the three remaining MPQ personality traits and expatriate adjustment.

Originality/value

While various studies have investigated the relationship between personality and expatriate adjustment in an Asian context, the majority have been conducted in largely monocultural settings, or at least on the implicit assumption of a single societal culture within the host country. This paper contributes to the literature by exploring the relationship in the context of a multicultural Asian host country.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Densil Anthony Williams

Abstract

Details

International Business Blunders: Lessons for Future Managers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-219-0

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Tom Seekins, Nancy Arnold and Catherine Ipsen

The Americans with Disabilities Act was established to promote universal access to community environments. Accessibility is not included in established community…

Abstract

Purpose

The Americans with Disabilities Act was established to promote universal access to community environments. Accessibility is not included in established community assessment systems, however, and there are few data comparing accessibility across cities. This lack of data hampers public policy, restricts consumer choice, and limits the development of a science of the environment and participation.

Design/methodology/approach

We developed a protocol for directly observing accessibility of public places and rated 226 randomly selected businesses in 19 towns in Montana.

Findings

Combining accessibility ratings across nine categories of accessibility, Montana’s small cities and towns achieved an overall accessibility rating of 2.66 on a four-point scale; equivalent to a D +  using a civil engineering grading framework. Exploratory analyses showed significant relationships between accessibility ratings and community economic variables. Surprisingly, our analyses showed a negative correlation with percent of city residents with disability.

Practical implications

It is feasible to assess accessibility of communities in a standard format. Systematic and longitudinal assessments of the accessibility of community infrastructure can contribute to community planning and development. There is a need to create a program to routinely monitor community environments as they change, integrate the findings into public policy and practice, and use the data as a basis for advancing a science of the environment.

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Christopher E. Whelpley and Michael A. McDaniel

Consistency theory and ego-defense theory have been used to examine the relationship between counterproductive work behavior (CWB) and self-esteem; however, these two…

Abstract

Purpose

Consistency theory and ego-defense theory have been used to examine the relationship between counterproductive work behavior (CWB) and self-esteem; however, these two theoretical approaches pose different directions for the expected relation. In line with this, previous research concerning the relationship between self-esteem and CWB has found inconsistent empirical results. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the relation between self-esteem and counterproductive behavior at work and draw conclusions about the merit of the competing theories. This study also examines the type of self-esteem as a potential moderator to this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed a psychometric meta-analysis of the relation between self-esteem and CWB using 21 correlations with a total n of 5,135.

Findings

The estimated population correlation was −0.26. The moderator analyses showed that global self-esteem had a stronger relation with CWB than organization-based self-esteem.

Practical implications

The relation between self-esteem and counterproductive behavior at work is important to organizations for two reasons. First, CWBs are very costly at all levels of the organization. Second, organizations and managers have some control over the level of their employee’s self-esteem.

Originality/value

Previous research has used both consistency theory and ego-defense theory to make predictions concerning the self-esteem and CWB relationship. This paper provides support for examining this relation using consistency theory due to the negative correlation the authors found between CWB and self-esteem.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2017

Victoria Choi Yue Woo, Richard J. Boland and David L. Cooperrider

As they say, “Change is the only constant.” Thriving and surviving during a period of extraordinary collision of technological advances, globalization, and climate change…

Abstract

As they say, “Change is the only constant.” Thriving and surviving during a period of extraordinary collision of technological advances, globalization, and climate change can be daunting. At any given point in one’s life, a transition can be interpreted in terms of the magnitude of change (how big or small) and the individual’s ontological experience of change (whether it disrupts an equilibrium or adapts an emergent way of life). These four quadrants represent different ways to live in a highly dynamic and complex world. We share the resulting four-quadrant framework from a quantitative and a mixed methods study to examine responses to various ways we respond to transitions. Contingent upon these two dimensions, one can use a four-quadrant framework to mobilize resources to design a response and hypothesize a desired outcome. Individuals may find themselves at various junctions of these quadrants over a lifespan. These four quadrants provide “requisite variety” to navigate individual ontology as they move into and out of fluid spaces we often call instability during a time of transition. In this chapter, we identified social, cognitive, psychological, and behavioral factors that contribute to thriving transition experiences, embracing dynamic stability. Two new constructs were developed, the first measures the receptivity to change, Transformation Quotient (TQ) and second measures the range of responses to transitions from surviving to thriving, Thriving Transitional Experiences (TTE). We hope our work will pave the way for Thriving to become a “normal” outcome of experiencing change by transforming the lexicon and expectation of engaging with transitions.

Details

Human Capital and Assets in the Networked World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-828-4

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