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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Jens Seiffert-Brockmann, Christopher Ruppel and Sabine Einwiller

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of critical, journalistic documentaries on viewers. More precisely, it investigates the effects of responsibility…

1586

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of critical, journalistic documentaries on viewers. More precisely, it investigates the effects of responsibility attribution and surprise on stakeholder attitude, trust and identification.

Design/methodology/approach

In a quasi-experimental pre-post setting, 127 participants viewed a documentary about Austrian beverage and marketing company Red Bull. The film inquired into the deaths of six extreme athletes sponsored by the company. As a critical, investigative piece, the documentary was designed to give viewers the impression that Red Bull was, at least partially, responsible for the athletes’ deaths.

Findings

Results show that responsibility attribution, the feeling of being surprised and being in a state of negative affect, had a significant impact on viewers’ attitude and trust toward, and identification with Red Bull.

Originality/value

The study adds insights on surprise as a factor in viewers’ assessment of responsibility. The study is original in terms of methodology by using real-time rating to ascertain which sequences trigger changes in responsibility attribution among viewers. Furthermore, implications of the study’s findings with regard to inoculation theory are discussed.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Sabine Einwiller, Christopher Ruppel and Cornelia Strasser

When in the Summer of 2015 unprecedented numbers of refugees traveled through Austria, not only public and governmental authorities were challenged to provide support, but…

1856

Abstract

Purpose

When in the Summer of 2015 unprecedented numbers of refugees traveled through Austria, not only public and governmental authorities were challenged to provide support, but also the business sector. Various companies responded to the challenge by organizing relief actions, among them Austrian Federal Railways (OEBB). The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of this initiative on stakeholder perceptions and behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The case of OEBB served as the research context. Data were collected by means of an online survey in May of 2016, about eight months after the initiative.

Findings

Almost half of the participants mentioned OEBB’s activities for refugees in an unaided recall task. Unaided corporate social responsibility (CSR) awareness is related to people’s issue involvement and reminiscence of specific activities and communication measures. People unaidedly recalling the initiative expressed a significantly better CSR image and identification with the company; they also expressed a stronger intention to speak positively (positive word of mouth) about the company’s CSR activities. CSR image and attitude toward the initiative mediates this effect.

Research limitations/implications

The study stresses the importance of CSR awareness and communication. The non-representative sample does not allow general inferences.

Originality/value

This research uses an actual case to test the effectiveness of CSR activities and communication in the context of a highly critical situation, and sheds light on the mediating processes that drive the effects. The study extends existing knowledge from experimental studies.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 August 2022

Christopher Ruppel, Julia Stranzl and Sabine Einwiller

The study focuses on the negative implications that an organizational crisis can have for individual employees. Specifically, it considers job-related uncertainty…

Abstract

Purpose

The study focuses on the negative implications that an organizational crisis can have for individual employees. Specifically, it considers job-related uncertainty, negative emotions (anxiety and frustration) and job disengagement. Through the lens of the social exchange theory, it is argued that internal crisis communication needs to provide sufficient socioemotional resources to their employees in order to mitigate these negative outcomes. In particular, the study argues for internal crisis communication that fosters organizational transparency and organizational support to achieve these mitigating effects.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey among employees in Austria was administered one year after the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic – this specific crisis context particularly evoked job-related uncertainty and negative emotions which are considered relevant drivers of job disengagement. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling based on a sample of N = 410.

Findings

Results show that employees' perceptions of job-related uncertainty are strongly linked to job-related anxiety and frustration; job-related frustration, in turn, strongly influences job disengagement. Overall, employees' perceptions of organizational transparency and organizational support contribute both to prevent the risk of job disengagement; however, the processes how these effects evolve differ. Whereas organizational transparency works on the cognitive level via a reduction of employees' perceptions of uncertainty, organizational support shows its effect on the emotional level through a reduction of job frustration.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the scarce research on how internal crisis communication can address employees' uncertainty, negative emotions and job disengagement during a crisis. Moreover, despite the lack of organizational responsibility for creating the crisis, the study emphasizes organizational accountability to respond to the needs of its employees to mitigate negative effects.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Sabine Einwiller, Christopher Ruppel and Julia Stranzl

Based on social exchange theory, the study examines the influence of informational and relational internal communication on cognitive and affective responses and job…

5192

Abstract

Purpose

Based on social exchange theory, the study examines the influence of informational and relational internal communication on cognitive and affective responses and job engagement during organizational crises caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of an online survey among people working in organizations with a minimum of 10 employees (N = 1,033) and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results show that informational and relational communication as organizational resources have a significant but distinct influence on how employees support their employer during the crisis. While informational communication influences employees' acceptance of managerial decisions, relational communication exerts most influence on affective commitment, which is the strongest driver of job engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design, specific crisis situation and geographic location are limitations of the study.

Practical implications

Delivering relevant information to employees quickly and reliably is important. Yet, relationship-oriented communication that demonstrates appreciation and allows for participation has even stronger effects on job engagement, which is essential to mastering challenges arising from a crisis.

Social implications

During the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations demanded much from their employees. In exchange, organizations should provide the resources information, status and love (Foa and Foa, 1980) by means of internal crisis communication.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates the role of different types of internal communication during organizational crises used to convey organizational resources, and it highlights the mediating role of acceptance and commitment to enhance employees' engagement at work.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Sabine Einwiller, Christopher Ruppel and Alexandra Schnauber

The purpose of this paper is to extend the theoretical discussion and empirical evidence on harmonization as well as differences in CSR reporting, and to dismantle…

2648

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the theoretical discussion and empirical evidence on harmonization as well as differences in CSR reporting, and to dismantle inconsistencies owing to the idiosyncratic methods applied in previous studies. While institutional and cultural differences suggest country-of-origin effects, the proliferation of global standards for CSR reporting is expected to promote harmonization.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review hypotheses concerning harmonization and country-of-origin effects were derived. Reports were content analyzed using the software Leximancer. Harmonization effects were examined by comparing reports of companies that adhered to the standards by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and UN Global Compact and those that did not declare to do so. Country-of-origin effects were explored by comparing reports of German and US multinational enterprises (MNEs).

Findings

The study reveals that there are comparatively greater similarities between reports issued by MNEs that adhere to global standards, especially GRI. Results also reveal some country-of-origin effects. While German MNEs report more on environmental issues, US MNEs have a stronger focus on society, especially the community.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the limited evidence for harmonization in CSR reporting due to the adherence to global reporting standards. Because comparability is important for many stakeholders addressed by the reports the findings are valuable for stakeholder management, but also for the initiatives who aim to enhance transparency and comparability.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Computer-Mediated Communication and Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-598-1

Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Kunal Ganguly and Siddharth Shankar Rai

To enhance the transparency of the supply chain and ensure proper dissemination of information among the supply chain members in a timely manner, more and more companies…

Abstract

Purpose

To enhance the transparency of the supply chain and ensure proper dissemination of information among the supply chain members in a timely manner, more and more companies are implementing supply chain information system (SCIS). Often the challenge among the organizations is how to go for a proper SCIS implementation and to identify the key performance indicators (KPIs) to evaluate the SCIS. The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework to evaluate the KPIs for SCIS of SCISs implementation from user’s perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, 16 KPIs were identified based on extensive literature survey. A fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model is constructed to measure the users’ perceived importance and satisfaction for the KPIs. Subsequently, based on these two measurements, an importance-performance analysis (IPA) model along with a customer satisfaction attitude (SA) index is developed to categorize and prioritize the KPIs. As an empirical study, SCIS users across five industries belonging to different sectors were investigated to validate the model.

Findings

An IPA model along with a customer SA index is developed based on a fuzzy AHP model to evaluate the KPIs and provide the priorities of their improvement. Based on this result, some management implications and suggestions are proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to five organizations. More representative samples which can be sector specific can ensure better confirmation of the empirical results.

Originality/value

The KPIs identified in the research indicate the nature and dynamics of a complex SCIS implementation. It can serve as a checklist of areas that require attention when implementing a SCIS. The KPIs are presented through grouping in a systemic way. The development of the SAs in IPA model using fuzzy AHP is a novel approach.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Santanu Mandal

This paper aims to explore the influence of dimensions of organizational culture, namely, development culture, group culture, rational culture and hierarchical culture, on…

3057

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of dimensions of organizational culture, namely, development culture, group culture, rational culture and hierarchical culture, on healthcare supply chain resilience (HCRES). Further, the study explored the moderating role of technology orientation on organizational culture dimensions and healthcare resilience linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a multi-unit study of different hospital supply chains (SCs). Consequently, perceptual data were gathered from seven dominant entities in a typical medical/hospital SC: hospitals, hotels, chemistry and pharmaceutical, marketing/public relations/promotion, medical equipment manufacturers and surgical suppliers, food and beverage providers (i.e. restaurants) and insurance providers. The responses were gathered using online survey and were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Based on 276 completed responses, positive influences were found for development, group and rational cultures on HCRES. As expected, a negative influence of hierarchical culture was found on HCRES. Further, technological orientation was found to enhance the positive effects of development, group and rational cultures on HCRES. However, no prominent moderation was noted for hierarchical culture’s influence on HCRES. The findings suggested managers to focus more on developing competing values framework (CVF)-based dimensions of organizational culture dimensions for effective risk mitigation so as to provide healthcare services in a timely manner to patients.

Originality/value

The study is the first to investigate the effects of organizational culture’s dimensions on resilience. The study has empirically established the association between CVF view and dynamic capabilities. The study underlined the importance of resilience in healthcare SCs. Resilience is an important dynamic capability in healthcare SCs to provide uninterrupted treatments and services to patients. Any failure in such a service can be fatal. Further, the study developed the measures of development, group, rational and hierarchical culture for further investigation in healthcare. This study is also the first to develop a measure for resilience in the healthcare sector.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Jenny Bossaller, Christopher Sean Burns and Amy VanScoy

The purpose of this paper is to use the sociology of time to understand how time is perceived by academic librarians who provide reference and information service (RIS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the sociology of time to understand how time is perceived by academic librarians who provide reference and information service (RIS).

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a qualitative secondary analysis (QSA) of two phenomenological studies about the experience of RIS in academic libraries. The authors used QSA to re-analyze the interview transcripts to develop themes related to the perception of time.

Findings

Three themes about the experience of time in RIS work were identified. Participants experience time as discrete, bounded moments but sometimes experience threads through these moments that provide continuity, time is framed as a commodity that weighs on the value of the profession, and time plays an integral part of participants’ narratives and professional identities.

Research limitations/implications

Given that the initial consent processes vary across organizations and types of studies, the researchers felt ethically compelled to share only excerpts from each study’s data, rather than the entire data set, with others on the research team. Future qualitative studies should consider the potential for secondary analysis and build data management and sharing plans into the initial study design.

Practical implications

Most discussions of time in the literature are presented as a metric – time to answer a query, time to conduct a task – The authors offer a more holistic understanding of time and its relationship to professional work.

Social implications

The methodology taken in this paper makes sense of the experiences of work in RIS for librarians. It identifies commonalities between the experience of time and work for RIS professionals and those of other professionals, such as physicians and software engineers. It suggests revising models for RIS, as well as some professional values.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a better understanding of time, understudied as a phenomenon that is experienced or perceived, among RISs providers in academic libraries. The use of secondary qualitative analysis is an important methodological contribution to library and information science studies.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Upasna A. Agarwal and Sushmita A. Narayana

The present study aims to examine the impact of relational communication, operationalized in terms of information sharing, quality and frequency of information, on buyer's…

1457

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to examine the impact of relational communication, operationalized in terms of information sharing, quality and frequency of information, on buyer's trust and relationship satisfaction in a buyer–vendor relationship. The study also tests the mediating role of trust and the moderating role of relationship commitment in relational communication and satisfaction relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the study were collected through a questionnaire survey from 321 managers of the different firms who were directly or indirectly involved in making procurement or purchasing decision in the firm and were familiar with the firm's supplier relationships.

Findings

Relational communication was found to be positively related to relational satisfaction and trust partially mediated this relationship. Further, relationship commitment moderated relational communication-satisfaction relationship, such that the positive affect of relational communication on relational satisfaction was accentuated when buyer experienced higher relationship commitment towards the supplier.

Research limitations/implications

Using single source, self-reported questionnaire data and cross-sectional research design are the limitations of this study. Studies in future should consider a dyadic perspective. The study outlines the need to explore investments and strategies in enhancing relational communication in buyer–vendor relationships.

Originality/value

Anchored in theoretical foundations of social exchange theory, the study integrates and tests behavioral aspects of buyer–vendor relationship. Testing an integrated model with direct and indirect effects of relational communication on relationship satisfaction in buyer–vendor is a significant contribution of the research. The study also contributes by examining relational exchanges in buyer-vendor relationships in India, an underrepresented context in buyer–supplier relationship (BSR) literature.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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