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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Dan A. Petrovici and Christopher Ritson

An analysis of patterns of food consumption in Romania is undertaken with the UK used as a benchmark when appropriate. The period of transition in Romania towards a more…

2522

Abstract

An analysis of patterns of food consumption in Romania is undertaken with the UK used as a benchmark when appropriate. The period of transition in Romania towards a more market‐oriented economy has involved substantial changes in patterns of food consumption and significant year‐to‐year variation. The decline in real incomes provides an interesting validation of Engel’s law on the relationships between household income and food expenditure. There is evidence that Romanian diet is deteriorating relative to modern nutrition guidelines; possible policy responses are discussed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Christopher Ritson and Li Wei Mai

Discusses the financial implications of maintaining acceptable levels of food safety. The case of BSE is used as an example ‐ loss of export market, fall in domestic…

3144

Abstract

Discusses the financial implications of maintaining acceptable levels of food safety. The case of BSE is used as an example ‐ loss of export market, fall in domestic sales, changes in consumption, large expenditure, cost of practice changes in rearing and slaughtering animals. There is a trade‐off between safety and costs. How much safety can be expected? There must be an optimum level of safety. There are few ways in which a market economy can “fail” in providing the optimum ‐ asymmetry in knowledge of risks; aspects of food safety which are public goods; social costs of food safety and the divergence between objective scientific evidence and consumer perception.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Christopher Ritson

Discusses the proposals for reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) contained in the European Commission’s Agenda 2000 document in the context of previous reforms…

740

Abstract

Discusses the proposals for reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) contained in the European Commission’s Agenda 2000 document in the context of previous reforms of the CAP and the GATT Agreement on Agriculture. Identifies the obstacles to CAP reform and the problems of extending the policy to embrace the countries of Eastern and Central Europe.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Susan Miles, Mary Brennan, Sharron Kuznesof, Mitchell Ness, Christopher Ritson and Lynn J. Frewer

Consumers may encounter a number of potential food hazards through their food choice decisions and consumption behaviour. It is psychologically determined risk perceptions…

4856

Abstract

Consumers may encounter a number of potential food hazards through their food choice decisions and consumption behaviour. It is psychologically determined risk perceptions that drive acceptance of such potential food hazards, and define people's risk‐taking or self‐protective behaviours. As such, it is necessary to understand exactly what consumers are worried about. Food issues of concern to consumers were identified in a previous exploratory focus group study. A list of 18 food safety issues was developed for the purpose of the study reported here, with the aim of comparing worry about the different issues and investigating any demographic differences. Factor analysis indicated that attitudes to the 18 food safety issues reflected two underlying constructs, the first relating to technological food issues and the second to lifestyle food issues. In general, people were more worried about technological food hazards compared to lifestyle hazards. Demographic differences were observed for gender, age and social class, but not for geographical region, or having children; furthermore, experience of food allergy or intolerance increased worry about technological issues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Mary McCarthy, Mary Brennan, Christopher Ritson and Martine de Boer

This article aims to explore the risk characteristics associated with food hazards on the island of Ireland and to assess how the public deal with perceived risks.

2115

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore the risk characteristics associated with food hazards on the island of Ireland and to assess how the public deal with perceived risks.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative investigation involving 12 focus groups was conducted on the island of Ireland. Content analysis was undertaken, with the assistance of the qualitative software tool QSR N6.

Findings

Four hazard categories (lifestyle, (bio)technological, microbiological and farm orientated production) were identified and the risk characteristics and risk relieving strategies associated with these hazards were explored. The risk perceptions of respondents were consistent with those defined by the psychometric paradigm. The risk characteristics of knowledge, control, dread, harm to health, freedom of choice, ease to identify were all mentioned, but their importance differed greatly depending on the hazards. For example, in the case of lifestyle hazards, personalisation of the risk, and thus dread, occurred when the individual had a health scare, while with microbiological hazards, knowledge and familiarity resulted in increased confidence in ability to cope with the hazard in the home. The media was noted as having an influential role in individual risk assessment. Finally, changing lifestyles were seen as contributing to increasing the level of exposure to food risks among the population. Further investigation into the sources and consequences of these changing lifestyles is required to guide future food policy.

Research limitations/implications

The number of focus group conducted and the qualitative nature of the research limits the degree to which generalised conclusions can be drawn.

Originality/value

These results provide a deeper qualitative understanding of risk perception issues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Sharron Kuznesof and Christopher Ritson

This study employs a focus group methodology to examine the factors affecting the acceptability of gene technology in food production, using genetically modified (GM…

3942

Abstract

This study employs a focus group methodology to examine the factors affecting the acceptability of gene technology in food production, using genetically modified (GM) farmed salmon as a focus for the research. The results identified a small group of “triers” ‐ willing to try any GM food product, and a small group of “refusers” ‐ rejecting the technology and derivative products. For the middle majority of “undecided” consumers, the decision to accept or reject GM food products was based on a number of interrelated factors, associated with the food product and the benefits conferred.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Garry D. Carnegie and Christopher J. Napier

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the special issue of Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal published in 1996 on the theme “Accounting history into the…

11921

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the special issue of Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal published in 1996 on the theme “Accounting history into the twenty‐first century”, in order to identify and assess the impact of the special issue in shaping developments in the accounting history literature, and to consider issues for future historical research in accounting.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective and prospective essay focusing on developments in the historical accounting literature.

Findings

The special issue's advocacy of critical and interpretive histories of accounting's past has influenced subsequent research, particularly within the various research themes identified in the issue. The most significant aspect of this influence has been the engagement of increasing numbers of accounting historians with theoretical perspectives and analytical frameworks.

Research limitations/implications

The present study examines the content and impact of a single journal issue. It explores future research possibilities, which inevitably involves speculation.

Originality/value

In addressing recent developments in the literature through the lens of the special issue, the paper emphasises the unifying power of history and offers ideas, insights and reflections that may assist in stimulating originality in future studies of accounting's past.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Kate Schofield and Ruth Ä. Schmidt

This paper explores the importance of clothes for gay males as semiotic markers for identity creation and communication in order to highlight the increasing fragmentation…

7240

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the importance of clothes for gay males as semiotic markers for identity creation and communication in order to highlight the increasing fragmentation of this market and the role of consumption practices as cultural markers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is grounded in qualitative data from participant observation, diaries interviews and a focus group of Manchester‐based respondents; findings are linked back to literature on postmodernism, image and identity.

Findings

Findings point to communication of individual identity through clothes; firstly, on a community level, as a marker of “gayness”; secondly, on a neo‐tribal level, indicating tribal allegiance and aiding inter‐tribal communication; thirdly, on a situational level, where clothing facilitates acceptance and integration. The proactive use of clothing as a semiotic marker enables the fluid construction and linking of multiple identities. Findings indicate the existence of quite specific codes with (gay) culturally embedded meanings which gay men can choose to identify with and make use of, or not, in different situations. Thus fashion is an important means of differentiation and communication of personal and group identities and affiliations.

Research limitations/implications

This is an in‐depth study of a small sample of subjects located in Manchester only. Despite satisfactory respondent and ecological validity it would therefore be desirable to extend the study to a larger sample size and replicate it in other settings before making wider generalisations.

Practical implications

Implications for marketers include the need to move away from treating this market as homogeneous as well as opportunities for “tribal marketing”.

Originality/value

Through its in‐depth qualitative approach the paper represents a rich picture of the UK gay fashion market which has a good degree of respondent validity and useful insights for marketers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Bilgehan Bozkurt

Abstract

Details

Debates in Marketing Orientation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-836-9

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

1 – 10 of 19