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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Christopher P. Neck and Jeffery D. Houghton

The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough review of self‐leadership literature past and present, including a historical overview of how the concept was created…

29320

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough review of self‐leadership literature past and present, including a historical overview of how the concept was created and expanded as well as a detailed look at more recent self‐leadership research trends and directions. The paper also presents a theoretical and conceptual explanation and differentiation of the self‐leadership concept relative to other related motivational, personality, and self‐influence constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

Self‐leadership research and related literatures of motivation, personality and self‐influence are discussed and described in order to present the current state of the self‐leadership body of knowledge and to suggest future directions to explore and study.

Findings

It is suggested that self‐leadership is a normative model of self‐influence that operates within the framework of more descriptive and deductive theories such as self‐regulation and social cognitive theory.

Research limitations/implications

While self‐leadership research composes an impressive body of knowledge, it is a domain of study that has been under‐investigated in some aspects, both empirically and conceptually.

Practical implications

This paper suggests several future directions that researchers can undertake to advance self‐leadership knowledge.

Originality/value

This paper fills a void in the organizational literature by reviewing the body of self‐leadership knowledge, by stating how self‐leadership is a distinctive theory in its own, and by presenting directions for future self‐leadership research.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Christopher P. Neck and Todd M. Edwards

The organisational literature suggests a plethora of techniques available to managers to enhance their managerial effectiveness (e.g., planning tools, decision‐making…

Abstract

The organisational literature suggests a plethora of techniques available to managers to enhance their managerial effectiveness (e.g., planning tools, decision‐making guidelines, etc.). However, an often‐overlooked skill that could assist managers in overcoming obstacles in their daily jobs involves the self‐management of their cognitive processes. In fact, a leading psychologist has written, “One of the most significant findings in psychology in the last twenty years is that individuals can choose the way they think,” (Seligman, 1991, p.8). It has been suggested that managers can better lead themselves and work more effectively with others by applying strategies that help them to manage or control their thoughts. More productive thinking and improved performance are the payoffs. This theory, labelled Thought Self‐Leadership (TSL), centres on employees' establishing and maintaining constructive desirable thought patterns (Neck & Manz, 1992; Manz & Neck, 1991; Neck & Milliman, 1994). This perspective suggests that just as we tend to develop behavioural habits that are both functional and dysfunctional, we also develop habits (or patterns) in our thinking that influence our perceptions, the way we process information, and the choices we make in an almost automatic way.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Christopher P. Neck

One major stream of organizational change research focuses on the relationship between senior level employees' cognitions and organizations' responses to change. It is…

Abstract

One major stream of organizational change research focuses on the relationship between senior level employees' cognitions and organizations' responses to change. It is argued here that the cognitive component is important towards how all members (not only top executives) of organizations react and respond to change. In this article, I examine the application of a cognitive process recently introduced into the organizational behavior literature, thought self‐leadership, to the organizational change process. Particularly, this application will focus on how thought self‐leadership can enhance employees' perceptions of specific organizational change. Additionally, a training‐based field experiment is discussed to illustrate and provide support for the arguments proposed.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Jeffery D. Houghton, Christopher P. Neck and Charles C. Manz

In terms of the body of knowledge examining work teams, several books and articles have attempted to address the underlying causes of why work teams fail. However, a…

2892

Abstract

In terms of the body of knowledge examining work teams, several books and articles have attempted to address the underlying causes of why work teams fail. However, a scarcity of writings has focused on the issue of work team sustainability. The dictionary defines “sustain” as “to prevent from falling, collapsing, or giving way,” and “to endure.” This definition gives rise to the following question: “What are the factors that contribute to those work teams that ‘endure’ and that do not ‘fall, collapse, or give way’ during challenging organizational experiences?” In this paper, we will take an initial step toward answering this question by presenting a cognitive model of work team sustainability based upon established cognitive principles of individual‐level effort and performance sustainability. This model is designed to provide some practical insights into the long‐term team performance sustainability issue while also serving as a possible foundation for future research efforts.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02683949510075155. When citing…

4396

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02683949510075155. When citing the article, please cite: Charles C. Manz, Christopher P. Neck, (1995), “Teamthink: beyond the groupthink syndrome in self-managing work teams”, Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 10 Iss: 1, pp. 7 - 15.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Mitchell J. Neubert and Ju‐Chien Cindy Wu

Seeks to examine the psychometric properties and construct validity of the Houghton and Neck Revised Self‐Leadership Questionnaire (RSLQ) in a Chinese context.

2959

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to examine the psychometric properties and construct validity of the Houghton and Neck Revised Self‐Leadership Questionnaire (RSLQ) in a Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

The RSLQ was administered to 559 Chinese employees of a large petroleum transportation company. Analyses included reliability assessments, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, and tests of association with creativity and performance.

Findings

The RSLQ did not uniformly generalize to a Chinese context. The best fitting model included the self‐leadership dimensions of goal‐setting, visualizing successful performance, self‐talk, self‐reward, and self‐punishment. The modified RSLQ was positively associated with creativity and in‐role performance.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study supports some components of self‐leadership generalizing to a Chinese context, the results suggest that further validation work is required on the RSLQ.

Practical implications

Managers will be well served to understand which dimensions of self‐leadership are generalizable across cultures, and how to measure the existence and development of such practices.

Originality/value

This research makes a significant contribution to research on self‐leadership by investigating the generalizability of the RSLQ to working adults in a non‐Western culture.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Christopher P. Neck, Heidi M. Neck, Charles C. Manz and Jeffrey Godwin

The concept of “Thought Self‐Leadership” involves individual self‐influence through cognitive strategies that focus on self‐dialogue, mental imagery, beliefs and…

7398

Abstract

The concept of “Thought Self‐Leadership” involves individual self‐influence through cognitive strategies that focus on self‐dialogue, mental imagery, beliefs and assumptions, and thought patterns. A plethora of studies from various fields including management, counseling psychology, sports psychology, education, and communication, address the effect of these Thought Self‐Leadership cognitive strategies on cognitions and behaviors. This research provides consistent support for the relationship between constructive self‐leadership of these cognitive processes and enhanced performance. The application of these cognitive strategies to the entrepreneurship domain, however, is sparse. We propose that the application of these principles to the entrepreneurial process offers the potential to enhance individual performance and mental states for both practicing and aspiring entrepreneurs. Propositions derived from the proposed framework are developed to serve as catalysts for empirically testing the applicability of Thought Self‐Leadership to the entrepreneurship context.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Jeffrey L. Godwin, Christopher P. Neck and Jeffery D. Houghton

The purpose of this paper is to apply an existing self‐leadership theory to goal‐setting theory in order to propose a mechanism to enhance the effectiveness of individual…

5943

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to apply an existing self‐leadership theory to goal‐setting theory in order to propose a mechanism to enhance the effectiveness of individual goal performance. An integral part of self‐leadership is the concept of thought self‐leadership (TSL). This perspective suggests that individuals can influence themselves by utilizing specific cognitive strategies. This article develops a cognitive explanation of how TSL can enhance individual goal performance.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Trudy C. DiLiello and Jeffery D. Houghton

The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a model of self‐leadership, innovation and creativity.

13151

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a model of self‐leadership, innovation and creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon existing theoretical and empirical evidence the paper develops and presents a conceptual model of the relationships between self‐leadership, innovation, creativity, and organizational support. The paper also presents research propositions based upon the relationships suggested by the model.

Findings

The model suggests that individuals with strong self‐leadership will consider themselves to have more innovation and creativity potential than individuals who have weak self‐leadership, and that individuals who have innovation and creativity potential will be more likely to practise innovation and creativity when they perceive strong support from the workplace than individuals who perceive weak support from the workplace.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers should examine empirically the linkages suggested by this model along with other relationships asserted or implied by the creativity and self‐leadership literature as summarized in the paper.

Practical implications

The model suggests that organizational leaders would be well advised to encourage the practice of self‐leadership among the members of organizations while striving to build work environments that support of creativity and innovation at the group, supervisor, and organizational levels.

Originality/value

This paper makes a valuable contribution to both the self‐leadership and creativity literatures by being one of the first to examine the relationships between these important organizational concepts.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Jeffery D. Houghton, T.W. Bonham, Christopher P. Neck and Kusum Singh

This study examined the relationship between self‐leadership and personality through an analysis and comparison of hierarchical factor structures. Structural equation…

8714

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between self‐leadership and personality through an analysis and comparison of hierarchical factor structures. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to examine several competing models combining the hierarchical factor structures of self‐leadership and personality. Model fit increased significantly through a progression of models that reflected increasingly greater distinction between self‐leadership skill dimensions and key personality traits. The best fitting model consisted of a hierarchical factor structure with three first‐order self‐leadership factors, three first‐order personality factors, and two correlated second‐order factors. Unexpectedly, the general second‐order factors of self‐leadership and personality were statistically indistinguishable. Nevertheless, these results seem to provide some initial evidence that self‐leadership dimensions are distinct from, yet related to, certain key personality traits. The implications of these results for future self‐leadership research and practice are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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