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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Christopher Orpen

Examines the effects of a two‐year formal mentoring programme in a medium‐sized manufacturing company on the work motivation, organizational commitment and job performance…

Abstract

Examines the effects of a two‐year formal mentoring programme in a medium‐sized manufacturing company on the work motivation, organizational commitment and job performance of mentees. Single measures were obtained, for each mentor‐mentee pair, at the completion of the programme, from the 39 mentors and 39 mentees who remained. These measures included the pairs’ interaction opportunities; and the closeness of their relationship. At the same time, measures were obtained from mentees of their work motivation and organizational commitment. The performance of each mentee was given by ratings from their superiors. Significant relations were found between interaction opportunities and both motivation and commitment, and between relationship closeness and both these attitudes. Finds that the relations between the two mentoring variables and performance were both non‐significant. The results suggest that formal mentoring can improve employee attitudes without necessarily raising their performance, at least in the short term.

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The Learning Organization, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Christopher Orpen

It is argued that the teaching of cross‐cultural management is both possible and, in principle, no different from teaching any other aspect of management. However, given…

Abstract

It is argued that the teaching of cross‐cultural management is both possible and, in principle, no different from teaching any other aspect of management. However, given the difficulties involved, it cannot be effectively taught through lectures and formal examinations, but instead requires the simultaneous employment of a variety of student‐involving techniques, some of which are described in the article; such as injecting cultural material into lectures, getting students to interview foreign managers, providing students with a cross cultural experience, having students make presentations on selected countries, and examining a few cultures in depth. The aim is not so much to prepare students to be expatriate managers in a particular country, as it is to develop an awareness of how to adapt their managing to any different culture.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Christopher Orpen

Suggests that many managers are unaware of what is involved inhuman resource planning. Presents a working framework for human resourcestrategy that can easily be followed…

Abstract

Suggests that many managers are unaware of what is involved in human resource planning. Presents a working framework for human resource strategy that can easily be followed: analysing the environment, developing company objectives, analysing human resources, forecasting human resource needs, developing human resource objectives, developing human resource strategies, and analysing the effect of human resource strategies. Concludes that companies cannot be successful if planning neglects the people that work for them.

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Work Study, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Christopher Orpen

94 Australian business graduates completed measures of perceived socialization, tactics during their initial few months in their first job after graduation. Three years…

Abstract

94 Australian business graduates completed measures of perceived socialization, tactics during their initial few months in their first job after graduation. Three years later in the same firms, they completed a measure of career satisfaction, and indicated how much their salary had grown and how many promotions they had received over this period. Perceived individualized tactics were significantly positively related to career satisfaction, whilst perceived institutionalized tactics were significantly negatively related. However, neither of these tactics were related to either salary growth or promotions received. Implications of these findings for the socialization of managers are discussed.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Christopher Orpen

Managerial stress exists and has to be coped with. The author describes a study that demonstrates that cue‐controlled relaxation can be applied to groups of managers to…

Abstract

Managerial stress exists and has to be coped with. The author describes a study that demonstrates that cue‐controlled relaxation can be applied to groups of managers to reduce psychological and physical stress. The study involved 36 middle managers with stress problems who were randomly exposed to treatment and non‐treatment, which consisted of a three‐week programme to teach conditioned relaxation responses to self‐administered cues. Three months after both groups completed measures of psychological strain, physical strain and job satisfaction. Results indicated that the treatment reduced psychological and physical strain and improved job satisfaction, but had a negligible impact on performance and physiological strain.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Christopher Orpen

To examine the impact of behaviour modelling training on attitudes and performance, 25 branch managers in an insurance company were randomly assigned to either a training…

Abstract

To examine the impact of behaviour modelling training on attitudes and performance, 25 branch managers in an insurance company were randomly assigned to either a training or non‐training condition. The trainees spent 48 hours on eight modelling modules, designed to improve their skills in dealing with their subordinates. The trainees reacted favourably to the training programme immediately and six months later. The trainees also received significantly higher performance ratings than managers in the non‐training condition a year later. Their branch profits also increased significantly more than did those of the non‐training managers over the same period. These results suggest that intensive behaviour modelling can improve attitudes and performance in certain kinds of jobs.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1983

Christopher Orpen

Although we all like to believe that there are opportunities for everyone to “make it” in organisations, the nature of hierarchies makes this impossible. Because of the…

Abstract

Although we all like to believe that there are opportunities for everyone to “make it” in organisations, the nature of hierarchies makes this impossible. Because of the pyramid‐like structure of all work organisations, the majority of middle managers will not be able to reach the highest levels in their organisations. During the 1950s and 1960s, when most organisations were expanding, the extent of the problem was not apparent. However, during the more recessionary times that have prevailed since the 1970s, the proportion of managers who have become “stalled” at the middle levels in the hierarchy has increased dramatically? According to Connor and Fielden and Levinson, it is between the ages of 40–45 that managers typically experience this kind of cessation in their movement upward in the organisation. According to Hunt, “Most middle managers will remain where they are, in the middle, oiling the machinery of our work organizations in what are, essentially, repetitive tasks. And for some this vision will have a time span of 20–30 years” (p. 10).

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Christopher Orpen

Tests the validity and reliability of peer evaluations of studentperformance among 75 third‐year university students on a managementcourse. Each student predicted the…

Abstract

Tests the validity and reliability of peer evaluations of student performance among 75 third‐year university students on a management course. Each student predicted the future performance of the other members of his/her seminar group in the final exam for the course on two separate occasions. Validates the extent to which these predictions matched the actual performances of the ratees in the final exam. The students also rated their similarity to each of the ratees on three aspects relevant to the course. The test‐retest reliability and validity coefficients of the peer evaluations were both significant. The validity of evaluations for others perceived to be similar was significantly higher than for those perceived to be dissimilar. Develops implications of these results for assessment and evaluation in higher education.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Christopher Orpen

Tests whether the stepladder technique, in which the entry ofmembers to a group is structured and every member is forced tocontribute, can improve team performance in…

Abstract

Tests whether the stepladder technique, in which the entry of members to a group is structured and every member is forced to contribute, can improve team performance in managerial problem solving. After completing the problem (the NASA moon landing exercise) individually, 160 management students were randomly assigned to one of 40 four‐member groups in either the stepladder condition or the conventional group condition, where subjects entered their groups and worked on the problem simultaneously. The stepladder groups produced significantly better decisions than the conventional groups, as hypothesized, suggesting that managers can use the technique to improve team performance in appropriate circumstances.

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Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Christopher Orpen

Using a contingency model of the effectiveness of performanceappraisal interviews as a framework, examines the extent to whichemployee job performance and employee…

Abstract

Using a contingency model of the effectiveness of performance appraisal interviews as a framework, examines the extent to which employee job performance and employee relations with their superior moderate the impact of goal setting in the interviews on the important outcomes: employees′ reactions to the interview and their degree of work motivation among 135 non‐managerial employees in a medium‐sized manufacturing company. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the impact of goal setting was stronger among poor performers than among good performers, and among employees who had good relations with their superiors than among those whose relations were relatively poor. Advances reasons for these and suggests implications for improving appraisals.

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International Journal of Career Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

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