Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Martin Christopher and Matthias Holweg

The purpose of this paper is to provide an update to the Supply Chain Volatility Index (SCVI), and expand on prior work by presenting a conceptual framework illustrating…

3979

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an update to the Supply Chain Volatility Index (SCVI), and expand on prior work by presenting a conceptual framework illustrating how firms can deal with persistent volatility, the ensuing risk and mitigate the cost implications for their supply chain operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use long-term time series of secondary data to assemble a “basket” of key indicators that are relevant to the business context within which global supply chains operate. The authors also report on five years of feedback gained from presentations of the SCVI to scholars and practitioners.

Findings

Volatility has reduced from record levels experienced during the global financial crises, yet remains at levels considerably higher than prior to the crisis, with no sign of a return to the more stable conditions that prevailed when many current supply chain networks were designed.

Research limitations/implications

The authors reaffirm that new mental models are needed which embrace volatility as a factor in supply chain design, rather than seek to eradicate it in supply chain operations. Traditional static “network optimisation” based on a simple definition of low unit cost seems no longer appropriate under conditions of persistent volatility.

Practical implications

The authors provide a conceptual link of volatility, risk and cost in the supply chain, and outline how firms can develop a supply chain strategy by managing their exposure to volatility.

Originality/value

The authors challenge the common assumption that volatility invariably leads to risk and higher cost in the supply chain. Instead the authors argue that the supply chain structure can mitigate the exposure to supply chain risk. The authors introduce the concepts of recovery and resilience cost within a framework designed to help firms manage volatility-induced risk by minimising the adverse cost implications of volatility in their supply chains.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2018

Agustina Calatayud, John Mangan and Martin Christopher

An emerging theme in the practitioner literature suggests that the supply chain of the future – enabled especially by developments in ICT – will be autonomous and have…

4910

Abstract

Purpose

An emerging theme in the practitioner literature suggests that the supply chain of the future – enabled especially by developments in ICT – will be autonomous and have predictive capabilities, bringing significant efficiency gains in an increasingly complex and uncertain environment. This paper aims to both bridge the gap between the practitioner and academic literature on these topics and contribute to both practice and theory by seeking to understand how such developments will help to address key supply chain challenges and opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-disciplinary, systematic literature review was conducted on relevant concepts and capabilities. A total of 126 articles were reviewed covering the time period 1950-2018.

Findings

The results show that both IoT and AI are the technologies most frequently associated with the anticipated autonomous and predictive capabilities of future supply chains. In addition, the review highlights a lacuna in how such technologies and capabilities help address key supply chain challenges and opportunities. A new supply chain model is, thus, proposed, one with autonomous and predictive capabilities: the self-thinking supply chain.

Originality/value

It is our hope that this novel concept, presented here for the first time in the academic literature, will help both practitioners to craft appropriate future-proofed supply chain strategies and provide the research community with a model (built upon multidisciplinary insights) for elucidating the application of new digital technologies in the supply chain of the future. The self-thinking supply chain has the potential in particular to help address some of today’s key supply chain challenges and opportunities.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Barbara Gaudenzi, Martin Christopher and Omera Khan

323

Abstract

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2017

Martin Christopher Saier

Investigating the beginning of project management (app. 30 BC) with a focus on business models similar to the “PDCA” cycle, the purpose of this paper is to find an…

1999

Abstract

Purpose

Investigating the beginning of project management (app. 30 BC) with a focus on business models similar to the “PDCA” cycle, the purpose of this paper is to find an approach which could be used as a new standard procedure for the eradication of projects in Lean project management.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on literature research of models similar to Walter A. Shehwart’s three-step and Edward W. Deming’s four-step (PDC(A)) wheel, the investigated models are interconnected to form a new concept which represents an innovative cycle logic proposed to be applied in Lean project management. This new cycle logic is rolled out on three different levels, which are transferred from the Lean management hoshin kanri model to Lean project management. In addition to literature research, semi-structured interviews were performed to get an indication as to the integration of Lean management (with a focus on PDCA) in project management today.

Findings

It was found that the “Check Plan Do” cycle is a Lean variant of the “Plan Do Check Act” model that is already used in consulting projects in practice, partially appears in project management standards, in governance models of ambulance, fire services, human aid and military forces and in quality management models of Six Sigma, design for Six Sigma and an excellence model of the European Foundation for Quality Management. To ensure continuous improvement it was found that the new CPD cycle can be used on different “planning” levels in analogy to the hoshin kanri logic.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, a discussion as to how the PDCA cycle can be adapted to Lean project management, considering the implication of business models similar to the PDCA wheel, has not yet been conducted within the field of project management.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Martin Christopher Mapley, Geoff Tansley, Jo P. Pauls, Shaun D. Gregory and Andrew Busch

Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques have been developed to rapidly produce custom designs from a multitude of materials. Bonded permanent magnets (PMs) have been…

Abstract

Purpose

Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques have been developed to rapidly produce custom designs from a multitude of materials. Bonded permanent magnets (PMs) have been produced via several AM techniques to allow for rapid manufacture of complex geometries. These magnets, however, tend to suffer from lower residual induction than the industry standard of injection moulding primarily due to the lower packing density of the magnetic particles and secondly due to the feedstock consisting of neodymium-iron-boron (Nd-Fe-B) powder with isotropic magnetic properties. As there is no compaction during most AM processes, increasing the packing density is very difficult and therefore the purpose of this study was to increase the magnetic properties of the PMs without increasing the part density.

Design/methodology/approach

Accordingly, this research investigates the use of anisotropic NdFeB feedstock coupled with an in-situ alignment fixture into an AM process known as selective laser sintering (SLS) to increase the magnetic properties of AM magnets. A Helmholtz coil array was added to an SLS machine and used to expose each powder layer during part fabrication to a near-uniform magnetic field of 20.4 mT prior to consolidation by the laser.

Findings

Permeagraph measurements of the parts showed that the alignment field introduced residual induction anisotropy of up to 46.4 ± 2.2% when measured in directions parallel and perpendicular to the alignment field. X-ray diffraction measurements also demonstrated a convergence of the orientation of the crystals when the magnets were processed in the presence of the alignment field.

Originality/value

A novel active alignment fixture for SLS was introduced and was experimentally shown to induce anisotropy in bonded PMs. Thus demonstrating a new method for the enhancement in energy density of PMs produced via AM methods.

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Edward A. Morash

One of the less observed results of transportation deregulation has been the explosive growth of transportation intermediaries or third‐party specialists such as brokers…

Abstract

One of the less observed results of transportation deregulation has been the explosive growth of transportation intermediaries or third‐party specialists such as brokers, shippers' agents and integrated leasing companies for use by industrial purchasers and marketing management. Such transportation intermediaries have the performance potential and apparent reasons for existence to suggest that they can both reduce delivered product costs and enhance service quality attributes to promote a company's competitive advantage. In a broader sense, intermediaries may be ideally positioned to assist in coordinating and processing information for the entire value‐added chain.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Remko van Hoek

This paper offers a retrospective on the launch and first volumes of this journal. It describes the history of a unique period in our discipline when founding fathers in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers a retrospective on the launch and first volumes of this journal. It describes the history of a unique period in our discipline when founding fathers in the US and UK collaborated with industry and each other to create a new field.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed founding editor Professor Martin Christopher and coeditor in Chief Professor Doug Lambert, conducted a bibliometric review of the first volumes of the journal and informed the analysis by approaches taken in other retrospectives published in the journal. The authors also feature historical artifacts from the journal.

Findings

The editorial focus during the early days of the journal demonstrate how the roots of the field are in cost modeling and technical work but quickly moved toward customer orientation and managerial focus. The editorial approach during the early days of the journal was on innovative research and publishing, scholarship engaged with industry, a focus on relevance and industry impact as well as leveraging research in education.

Originality/value

There have been retrospectives on the journals most recent volumes but what the authors aim to do is to reflect upon the launch and the first volumes of the journal. The authors expand and further detail the timeline of the development of the logistics field. In the process, the authors identify several historical roots for topics of greater focus in logistics and supply chain management in later years. The authors also find that many of the essential approaches and lessons learned in the period leading up to the launch and shortly after the launch of the journal do not only capture the early development of the discipline it also offers an approach and model for scholarship worthy of consideration still today. On top of that, several of the lessons learned in that period hold high relevance still today and they imply part of the path forward for the discipline and the journal, the authors develop questions for future research and research and editorial strategies.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

MARTIN CHRISTOPHER

Logistics management is increasingly seen as a major source of competitive advantage to business as Martin Christopher, professor of marketing and logistics systems…

Abstract

Logistics management is increasingly seen as a major source of competitive advantage to business as Martin Christopher, professor of marketing and logistics systems, Cranfield School of Management explains.

Details

Logistics World, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-2137

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb038827. When citing the…

1656

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb038827. When citing the article, please cite: MARTIN CHRISTOPHER, LEONARD MAGRILL, GORDON WILLS, (1971), “Educational development for marketing logistics”, International Journal of Physical Distribution, Vol. 1 Iss: 2, pp. 79 - 82.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1989

MARTIN CHRISTOPHER and ALAN BRAITHWAITE

Time is a business commodity which has an enormous opportunity cost. Yet normal business controls make no attempt to value or identify the scale or nature of this. In this…

Abstract

Time is a business commodity which has an enormous opportunity cost. Yet normal business controls make no attempt to value or identify the scale or nature of this. In this paper Professor Martin Christopher and Alan Braithwaite introduce the concept of Strategic Lead Time Management as a means of measuring and valuing the time efficiency of business.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

1 – 10 of over 2000