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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Dara G. Schniederjans, Stephen A. Atlas and Christopher M. Starkey

As organizations increasingly engage with consumers over mobile devices, there is a growing need to understand how consumers react to impression management over platforms…

Abstract

Purpose

As organizations increasingly engage with consumers over mobile devices, there is a growing need to understand how consumers react to impression management over platforms with limited textual content. The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess how different impression management tactics can be used in mobile media to enhance consumer perception-attitude-intentions toward a corporate brand.

Design/methodology/approach

We surveyed 670 consumers and estimate structural equation models and repeated-measures ANOVAs to determine how short passages employing alternate impression management tactics influence consumers’ perceptions, attitudes and purchase intentions.

Findings

Results reveal that each impressions management tactic (i.e. ingratiation, intimidation, organizational promotion, supplication and exemplification) influences consumer perceptions, attitudes and intentions. The authors compare differences in how the impressions management tactics influence each stage of the perception-attitude-intentions model and find evidence that initial differences in perceptions favoring ingratiation and exemplification appeals become magnified for purchase intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Recent calls for research focus on an understanding of how consumers process information on reduced-content platforms of small-screened mobile devices. These results provide empirical evidence of the use of impression management and the difference between five impression management tactics on enhancing consumer perception-attitude-intentions model.

Practical implications

The results of this study will provide marketers with insights to optimize communications and corporate brands with consumers over mobile media.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the nascent yet vital literature on mobile marketing by focusing on how impression management tactics influence perceptions, attitudes and intentions through the short message characteristic of mobile platforms. The authors develop a framework for how corporate brand management can strategically use impressions management tactics in this novel domain.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to…

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Abstract

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to uncover specific articles devoted to certain topics. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume III, in addition to the annotated list of articles as the two previous volumes, contains further features to help the reader. Each entry within has been indexed according to the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus and thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid information retrieval. Each article has its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. The first Volume of the Bibliography covered seven journals published by MCB University Press. This Volume now indexes 25 journals, indicating the greater depth, coverage and expansion of the subject areas concerned.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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53529

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Michael W. Starkey, David Williams and Merlin Stone

First, this paper explores the many varied, and often confusing, definitions of relationship marketing, customer relationship management (CRM) and customer management…

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6940

Abstract

First, this paper explores the many varied, and often confusing, definitions of relationship marketing, customer relationship management (CRM) and customer management (CM). Then it reports the results of a survey that examined the CM performance of 34 companies in the consumer banking, credit card, insurance, oil (lubricants) and automotive industries in Malaysia. The research was conducted using the Customer Management Assessment ToolTM (CMATTM) developed by QCi Ltd, a management consultancy that specialises in assessing and improving CM. CM performance was found to be especially poor in insurance and consumer banking. The best performing sector was the credit card industry.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Roya Rahimi

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of four organisational cultural traits of adaptability, consistency, involvement and mission on the three components of…

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8682

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of four organisational cultural traits of adaptability, consistency, involvement and mission on the three components of customer relationship management (CRM), namely, people, process and technology, in the context of the hotel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Required data are collected with a quantitative approach and a questionnaire adapted from the Denison organisational culture survey and the Mendoza CRM model. The questionnaire was distributed among 364 managers of a chain hotel in the UK and gathered data were examined using the structural equation modelling method.

Findings

The results of this study reveal that the four traits of organisational culture (adaptability, consistency, involvement and mission) have positive and significant impacts on the three components of CRM (people, process and technology). A set of theoretical contributions and practical implications was also discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted with a case study approach; hence, the findings cannot be generalised to a larger population, and the results might be different for other industries. Because of the limitation of access to all employees, only managers were selected as the sample, and future studies with all employees may show different results.

Practical implications

Current study helps hotel managers to understand the role and importance of organisational cultural traits in successful implementation of their CRM strategy components.

Originality/value

The position taken in this study recognises the need to enhance the understanding of organisational culture’s impact on implementing CRM components. Organisational cultural traits have different levels of impact on CRM implementation, and this is the first study to investigate the detailed impacts of the four traits of adaptability, consistency, involvement and mission on the three components of CRM, namely, people, process and technology.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

Shashank Rao and Thomas J. Goldsby

The purpose of this paper is to review the growing literature examining supply chain risk management (SCRM) and to develop a typology of risks in the supply chain.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the growing literature examining supply chain risk management (SCRM) and to develop a typology of risks in the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws its insights and conclusions from a review of the literature on supply chain risk, and a synthesis of the broader domain of risk management.

Findings

While the literature on SCRM is growing, the literature lacks an organized structure for the sources of supply chain risk. The current paper bridges this gap by synthesizing the diverse literature into a typology of risk sources, consisting of environmental factors, industry factors, organizational factors, problem‐specific factors, and decision‐maker related factors.

Practical implications

The paper devises a typology that can be used by managers to measure and assess the vulnerabilities of their company and supply chain. The typology also provides avenues for future research that further guides practitioners in the management of their supply chain risk portfolio.

Originality/value

SCRM is rapidly developing into a favored research area for academicians as well as practitioners, especially after the attacks of September 11 and the recent array of natural disasters. This paper develops a methodology for structuring academic inquiry in this important research area.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2010

Christopher Roberts and Frank Alpert

Businesses today face a number of difficult challenges that make customer engagement more important than ever. The usual way in which businesses operate makes it difficult…

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10227

Abstract

Purpose

Businesses today face a number of difficult challenges that make customer engagement more important than ever. The usual way in which businesses operate makes it difficult to achieve high levels of consumer engagement. Perhaps the main problem with all the bits and pieces of ideas that would promote customer engagement – branding to consumers, internal marketing within the company, and service delivery – is how to fit all these together. The way to implement such models throughout the company is not clear and not easy to understand.

Design/methodology/approach

The total engagement model puts everything together into an efficient and effective system. The key is focusing on aligning all activities of the company on a unified plan for customer engagement, including advertising, service, products and the internal culture. An important benefit of the total engagement model is the synergy through total brand strategy alignment throughout the company: the whole (through integration) is greater than the sum of the parts (of which some may already be good and some not so good but they may be fragmented). The proposed model is fairly comprehensive and thereby integrates and clearly explains, with emphasis on actionability, how to design and operationalise a growth plan driven by increasing customer engagement.

Findings

The findings of two case studies are presented, which illustrate the model at work.

Practical implications

The approach will be of interest to managers who seek to integrate a comprehensive, actionable brand management model throughout the company in order to maximise growth potential.

Originality/value

The paper outlines an original business model, the “total engagement model,” which, when executed well, can help an organisation to achieve business growth via customer engagement.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Christopher Shaw

This paper aims to use the results of a synthesis of six social science fellowships to explore how alternative framings of the climate justice debate can support fairer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the results of a synthesis of six social science fellowships to explore how alternative framings of the climate justice debate can support fairer climate policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The original fellowships drew on sociology, economics, geography, psychology and international relations. Cross-cutting themes of rights, risks and responsibilities were identified following a series of workshops. Results of these workshops were discussed in a number of policy fora. Analysis of the feedback from that fora is used to propose the case for a rights, risks and responsibilities approach to building a more accessible climate justice debate.

Findings

Existing climate policy unjustly displaces a) responsibility for emission reductions, b) risks from climate impacts and c) loss of rights. Foundational questions of acceptable risk have been ignored and a just climate policy requires procedurally just ways of revisiting this first-order question.

Research limitations/implications

The contribution a rights, risks and responsibilities framework can bring to a process of educating for climate stewardship is at this stage theoretical. It is only through trialling a rights, risks and responsibilities approach to climate justice debates with the relevant stakeholders that its true potential can be assessed.

Practical implications

Policy actors expressed strong resistance to the idea of overhauling current decision-making processes and policy frameworks. However, moving forward from this point with a more nuanced and tactical understanding of the dialectical relationship between rights, risks and responsibilities has the potential to improve those processes.

Social implications

Educating for climate stewardship will be more effective if it adopts an approach which seeks a co-production of knowledge. Beginning with the foundational question of what counts as an acceptable level of climate risk offers an inclusive entry point into the debate.

Originality/value

Reveals limits to public engagement with climate policy generated by a ‘justice’ framing.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Călin Gurău

The specific advantages of the Internet as a transaction and communication channel present new opportunities for businesses to create a long‐term relationship with their…

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7061

Abstract

The specific advantages of the Internet as a transaction and communication channel present new opportunities for businesses to create a long‐term relationship with their customers. The level of e‐service quality is an essential component of this customer‐centric strategy. The paper presents a predictive method to establish the optimum level of e‐service quality, taking into consideration customers’ satisfaction, customers’ profitability, the competitive conditions of the market, and company's capabilities. However, the effective use of this method requires the implementation of e‐CRM systems, structured around a customer‐centric approach. Therefore, the re‐design of the company structure and processes using a customer‐focused philosophy is also assessed in a stage‐by‐stage analysis.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Alan Fish, Xianglin (Shirley) Ma and Jack Wood

Issues, which have negatively impacted a diversity of business stakeholders, suggest that business thinking and leadership behaviors surrounding a desired strategic…

Abstract

Issues, which have negatively impacted a diversity of business stakeholders, suggest that business thinking and leadership behaviors surrounding a desired strategic business focus appear increasingly inadequate. For example, that integration strategies and differentiation strategies are mutually exclusive. Three issues appear to contribute to such circumstances.

First, Western strategic business frameworks are largely based on quantitative foci, and remain largely unchallenged. Second, balance between key leadership team agendas and external stakeholder expectations is usually absent. Third, there is minimal connection between what organizational cultures reward, and how human resource management prescriptions provide support.

To address such concerns and implant a renewed strategic business focus, Porter and Kramer (2006, 2011) have identified the notion of shared value, which seems an appealing means to redress business problems represented by negative multistakeholder relations; moreover, an absence of any contemporary acknowledgment of the social contract. Nevertheless, a number of elements appear to be missing from the how shared value is portrayed by Porter and Kramer (2006, 2011).

Based on Maslow’s notion of Eupsychia, and employing an Ideation approach, a renewed strategic business focus supporting the notion of shared value is presented. The renewed focus seeks to enhance Porter and Kramer’s (2011) framework, by including key features to enhance shared value, including elements of Eastern and Western philosophy, and Western organization theory.

Problematic examples, identifying the absence of shared value, and including research propositions are identified.

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