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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Andreas Strobl and Christopher Kronenberg

This paper aims to deliver a detailed understanding about the dynamics of entrepreneurial networks along the enterprise life cycle of hospitality enterprises.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deliver a detailed understanding about the dynamics of entrepreneurial networks along the enterprise life cycle of hospitality enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study research was conducted, using in-depth interviews with hospitality entrepreneurs and additional material (e.g. website information). The data were analyzed applying the qualitative method GABEK (GAnzheitliche BEwältigung von Komplexität – holistic processing of complexity) which enables researchers to reveal concepts and attitudes of interviewees.

Findings

Networks of hospitality entrepreneurs shift from local ties to industry-specific actor groups to local and non-local ties to actor groups inside and outside the industry. Throughout the enterprise life cycle, entrepreneurs prefer strong ties. The transition from one family generation to the next and changes in the competitive environment are important triggers of network configurations.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should reproduce the findings and investigate the proposed relationships in representative samples from different regions and industries. The influences of different actors within networks provide fertile research opportunities.

Practical implications

Networks provide viable means for tackling the challenges of growth in the hospitality industry. The research provides managerial implications for how networks should be configured for meeting resource dependencies of different development stages.

Originality/value

Building on resource dependency theory, this research emphasizes which challenges the enterprise life cycle imposes upon network management in the hospitality industry. While past research has focused upon the early stages of the enterprise life cycle, this study investigates also later stages. Furthermore, triggers of network management are identified.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Juho Pesonen, Raija Komppula, Christopher Kronenberg and Mike Peters

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences and relationships of push and pull motivations in two different rural tourism destinations.

7560

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences and relationships of push and pull motivations in two different rural tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from tourists visiting rural tourism companies in Finland and in Tyrol (Austria). The data were analyzed using analysis of variance and correlation coefficients.

Findings

The results indicate significant differences of push and pull motivations in the two regions. In addition, tourists motivated by different variables obviously search for different destination attributes. For example, tourists motivated by the search of a once‐in‐a‐lifetime experience expect different destination attributes than those respondents searching for a sense of comfort or an opportunity to relax.

Research limitations/implications

The low sample size in both Tyrol and Finland reduces the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by rural tourism companies and practitioners to understand how push and pull motivations affect tourist behaviour. Based on this information, marketing initiatives can be customized for various target segments in this particular market.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to examine the inter‐relationship between push and pull motivations in rural tourism and one of the most detailed studies on rural tourist motivations. Additionally, the comparison of the two countries underlines the assumption, that cultural or macro‐economic variables strongly influence push and pull motivations of consumers.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 66 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Christian Laesser

397

Abstract

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 66 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2012

Christopher J. Fries

Research is needed that uses large enough samples to facilitate disaggregation of users by specific types of complementary/alternative medical (CAM) practices and by…

Abstract

Research is needed that uses large enough samples to facilitate disaggregation of users by specific types of complementary/alternative medical (CAM) practices and by ethnicity in order to examine possible patterns in the use of CAM therapies not accorded efficacy by family physicians. The objective of this study is too use data from a large population health survey to determine the relationship ethnicity, measured with multiple indicators, has with the use of CAM therapies classified as “accepted” or “rejected” by family physicians in terms of efficacy. Using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Cycle 1.1, logistic regression models estimate the factors influencing the use of the two binary categories of CAM therapy. Measures of ethnicity available in the CCHS are used to focus on ethnic origin, comparing North American and Foreign born, and on ethnic identification, comparing Whites with Asians, South Asians, Blacks, Latin Americans, Aboriginals, and others. Whites and North American born had higher odds of using “accepted” therapies, whereas immigrant visible minorities and those with Asian ethnic identities were more likely to use “rejected” therapies. This research confirms that ethnicity constitutes a cultural resource upon which users of CAM draw as they make their health-care decisions, sometimes despite the recommendations of family physicians.

Details

Issues in Health and Health Care Related to Race/Ethnicity, Immigration, SES and Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-125-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1942

SEPTEMBER sees the irrevocable passing of summer and the inevitable looking forward to autumnal plans. Such plans must be made, even in the shadows of this world…

Abstract

SEPTEMBER sees the irrevocable passing of summer and the inevitable looking forward to autumnal plans. Such plans must be made, even in the shadows of this world situation, which as we write are as menacing as they have been since war began, and before these words appear another fourteen of the sixty days which Mr. Lyttleton warned us would be the gravest in our history will have elapsed. That leaves a formidable margin for possibilities. Librarians, as deeply involved as any people in the conflict, must nevertheless act as if the work of life will go on, even if not as in peace. Our difficulties do not lessen; more and more of our lads and girls, and some rather beyond the age these words cover, are being removed from libraries; the book situation worsens; and the demands for books increase, especially in what until recently were evacuation areas, to which many of our exiles have now returned.

Details

New Library World, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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